#1
Hey guys,

I've finally begun taking lessons for guitar again after 6 years of self teaching.

I've basically being set on a rigorous metronome course in my spare time. Nothing too musical; just running up various scales in different ways, as a fingering exercise.

Naturally, it's taking me a while to build the speed up for this run, but it got me thinking. Do guitarists have to go through this practice with EVERY single lick they ever learn? I think of all these professional musicians, and I cannot comprehend learning all the licks they use in their songs at the same speed that I'm practising just this one riff.

I want to know from the more experience players out there what it's like in the later stages of learning shred speed and precision. When you learn a new lick, do you start at a far quicker tempo than when you first started practising fast legato/shred? Are there some licks that you master within half an hour? Once you've learnt a few licks, do you find that newer licks are learnt quicker out of pure background knowledge and muscle memory from previous licks?

So what's it like to be a quicker more advanced player and practising? I feel that I may be motivated further, knowing what this feels like, and how my practice regime will evolve with experience
#2
I'm done with all that kind of practising with a metronome pretty much.I've developed a good sense of timing with the practice i've done over the years and i can tell if it's off just by ear.Usually i go through new licks a few times slow to make sure i have all the notes right and get a feel for the phrasing then just let it rip.It seems to work itself out that way naturally and not a lot of thought goes into it, but i practice every day.
#3
1+ King Sherdder.

I think going slow with a metronome then building the speed is overrated.
Still important to practice it but not as much as people say.
🍗🎹🎶🎼🎧🎤🎮👾🎸🎨🎷⚽️🎱🏁🎺🎻🍮🍰🍪📱👻🐔🐣🐥🐤🐽🐷💀👽💩💸🚽👻
#4
It depends on your knowledge on the instrument, and how familiar with whatever style you're playing. Playing shred guitar is very basic when you break down what they're playing. It's the speed they're playing at that makes what they're playing look so complicated, but if you slow it down, and see how they're playing the licks then it's more than simple. I think you really need to lock, and grasp the concept of this down in order to really build technique. "Doing the advance techniques is just doing the basics really well".


Metronomes are very useful if you know how to apply them to your practice, but then again it all comes down to how much knowledge a person posses, and experience with numerous things ranging from musical techniques; all the way down to rhythmic subdivisions. The more advance you get the more easier it is to learn licks. In your case this is for shred guitar whether it's flamenco metal or fast paced blues. Just slow down, and perfect the licks you're playing at with a comfortable BPM with the metronome.

Then when you're confident with the BPM you're practicing the lick at raise the BPM up 5 BPM. Building technique is priceless when you're a guitarist it makes your playing sound more articulate, and extravagant. To answer your question fully yes it gets more easier when you're more advance things just get under your fingers way more quickly..

Last edited by Black_devils at Aug 17, 2015,
#5
Do guitarists have to go through this practice with EVERY single lick they ever learn?


No, it's mostly memorizing and then building up speed with most licks. If the lick is not near your motorical skill ceiling it will usually not take very long and phrasing gets most of the attention.

When you learn a new lick, do you start at a far quicker tempo than when you first started practising fast legato/shred? Are there some licks that you master within half an hour? Once you've learnt a few licks, do you find that newer licks are learnt quicker out of pure background knowledge and muscle memory from previous licks?


Yes pretty much this. You don't necessarily start very fast for the memorizing but once that is done the speeding up doesn't take too long.
Last edited by Facecut at Aug 17, 2015,
#6
when you get into a recording studio, all the time you're spending with that metronome is gonna pay off

unless nobody else in your band can play with a click track, in which case you're probably gonna spend $2000 to get a shitty 4-track demo halfway listenable
modes are a social construct