#1
Okay, so as a teen who's been playing consistently for about 2 months, I have only learned about 2 things to play on my guitar thus far. I've learned the solo to Nothing Else Matters, and Plug In Baby.

I've spent some time looking through various scales, practicing them, and have learned Major + Minor pentatonic, the Blues scale, Ionian, Dorian, and Phrygian. At this point, I'm not really sure what to be learning or what I should be attempting to learn. I enjoy a variation of music, but bands such as Polyphia, Sabbath, Pantera, Avenged Sevenfold, Bullet for my Valentine are my favorites.

I play on a beaten up Yamaha Hendrix style (I play left handed on a right handed) and I'll have a Lefty ESP LTD EC-1000 coming in early September. Amp wise, I'm looking at either a Line 6 Spider 15w or a Fender Champion 20w (having to buy it myself, I don't have much to spend @ 15 yrs old). I play usually random bits and pieces of songs that I can all the time and I'm looking to start a high school band soon w/ some friends as we stay afterschool for hours to practice.

Any help would be appreciated and taken into consideration. =]
Last edited by xenorae at Aug 18, 2015,
#2
As a HUGE Bullet Fan, and understanding you're going to want to do a band, that 15Watt Spider is NOT going to cut it. The guitar is a great start btw. Good job. What's your budget for amp/pedals? And are you willing to go used? Used is a GREAT way to stretch a budget. I recently got a Peavey 120Watt Triple XXX 2x12 for only $375 and you can get deals similar if you're willing to go used.
Quote by Roc8995
Yes, and people still got polio and you had to crank your car up by hand and put whale oil in the lamps every night.

Things are better now.


Quote by dannyalcatraz
Style is in the hands. Taste is in the hands. But tone? Tone is in the gear.
#3
Honestly I had to get the guitar itself used, as for the amp I'm fine with getting a used one, in fact the first one I've gotten and currently have is a Vox Pathfinder 10w and from experience, I understand that it's probably not gonna cut it. It's one of those things where you want something better than what you have currently ASAP, but I'd be willing to save up a bit. I just don't usually end up saving up much or even getting that much cash in the first place, so I was going for something cheap that'd just be 'eh' for what I want to do.
#4
Quote by xenorae
Honestly I had to get the guitar itself used, as for the amp I'm fine with getting a used one, in fact the first one I've gotten and currently have is a Vox Pathfinder 10w and from experience, I understand that it's probably not gonna cut it. It's one of those things where you want something better than what you have currently ASAP, but I'd be willing to save up a bit. I just don't usually end up saving up much or even getting that much cash in the first place, so I was going for something cheap that'd just be 'eh' for what I want to do.


I really hate to keep sounding like a Fender salesman but you should look into a mustang IV or V. You can get all the volume you will ever need. You also get 100 fully customizable presets that can be switched with the included footswitch (no costly pedals) its probably the best deal going for the value you get.

They are extremely loud!! I own a mustang 3 amd it will blow your hair back with just 1 100w 12".

I want to say you can get a 5 cab and head combo for like 500 bucks.
#5
In my opinion, stop learning all sorts of scales and theory and stuff(for now). Learn songs to play. And when you have those down learn more songs!

Also a small amp may not cut it for long in a band setting, but if that's all you can get then so be it! I played through a 15 w Marshall for quite awhile but it was driven hard.
#6
Quote by esky15
In my opinion, stop learning all sorts of scales and theory and stuff(for now). Learn songs to play. And when you have those down learn more songs!

.


Keep learning those scales and theory. All that stuff will come together for you and it's definitely not wasted time.
And yes, learn songs.
And see if you can find someone to play WITH.
#7
Quote by dspellman
Keep learning those scales and theory. All that stuff will come together for you and it's definitely not wasted time.
And yes, learn songs.
And see if you can find someone to play WITH.



Yes! A much fuller equation.
#8
Quote by dspellman
Keep learning those scales and theory. All that stuff will come together for you and it's definitely not wasted time.
And yes, learn songs.
And see if you can find someone to play WITH.


I actually wanted to get into music theory more with a music theory class @ my school, but it's only AP music theory, and I can barely even read sheet music, so that was instantly out. Scales are just about all I can learn w/o sight reading I assume.
#9
Quote by xenorae
I've spent some time looking through various scales, practicing them, and have learned Major + Minor pentatonic, the Blues scale, Ionian, Dorian, and Phrygian. At this point, I'm not really sure what to be learning or what I should be attempting to learn


If you’ve bothered to learned the pentatonic scale and three other modes in two months you’ve clearly got a knack for formal music theory. Many professional rock guitarists probably don’t know anything beyond the pentatonic scale. Lessons would be a good next step. Look for a jazz teacher, because if you’re playing modes already then you’re going to end up there eventually anyway. And I don’t necessarily mean playing jazz…just learning it for other reasons.
Last edited by jpnyc at Aug 18, 2015,
#10
don't learn modal scales. your major and minor scales should be more than enough until you learn your intervals and chord construction, then you won't even use those

Quote by xenorae
I actually wanted to get into music theory more with a music theory class @ my school, but it's only AP music theory, and I can barely even read sheet music, so that was instantly out. Scales are just about all I can learn w/o sight reading I assume.


take AP theory, but only when you're ready to really care. it's a hard class because most of the test involves ear training.

as for an amp, a yamaha thr or a roland cube should suit your needs fairly well


also TS, are you from texas? given your interests it's hard to know why you'd be into polyphia unless you're from DFW
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


Quote by UseYourThumb
You win. I'm done here.
Last edited by Hail at Aug 18, 2015,
#11
Make a list of songs you'd like to learn from artistes you like, then narrow it down to the ones that sound like they're just slightly out of your skill level. Then practice your ass off. Place the rest into a bucket list.

Beyond that, there's really nothing we can say that can motivate you to practice. It all boils down to how much you want to since this is ultimately still a hobby that we all pursue. I won't suggest learning theory in the early stages, although it would do you good as a musician (but not necessarily as a guitarist yet).

Edit: I own a Pod HD so you can consider this a biased recommendation, but I suggest getting a Pod and powered speakers (or if you're as cheap as me, just hook up a crappy amp to the Pod) to act as your amp. It's not cheap (though it's not expensive, especially if you consider going second-hand, the versatility, etc), but you'll be able to get whatever tone you want, from shimmering cleans to huge metal tones. You'll also be able to use it as an interface to do recordings, which would be handy for when you're working with your band.
Last edited by triface at Aug 19, 2015,
#12
Quote by xenorae
Okay, so as a teen who's been playing consistently for about 2 months, I have only learned about 2 things to play on my guitar thus far. I've learned the solo to Nothing Else Matters, and Plug In Baby.

I've spent some time looking through various scales, practicing them, and have learned Major + Minor pentatonic, the Blues scale, Ionian, Dorian, and Phrygian. At this point, I'm not really sure what to be learning or what I should be attempting to learn. I enjoy a variation of music, but bands such as Polyphia, Sabbath, Pantera, Avenged Sevenfold, Bullet for my Valentine are my favorites.

I play on a beaten up Yamaha Hendrix style (I play left handed on a right handed) and I'll have a Lefty ESP LTD EC-1000 coming in early September. Amp wise, I'm looking at either a Line 6 Spider 15w or a Fender Champion 20w (having to buy it myself, I don't have much to spend @ 15 yrs old). I play usually random bits and pieces of songs that I can all the time and I'm looking to start a high school band soon w/ some friends as we stay afterschool for hours to practice.

Any help would be appreciated and taken into consideration. =]


honestly you're going to need way more time in than 2 months before being in a band is going to be a happening thing. you haven't mentioned learning any chords which are the building blocks of songs. you're going to spend way more time in a band playing rhythm than lead. as mentioned for band purposes you'll need a way better amp than the 2 you mentioned. try not to get to far ahead of yourself is the best advice i can give. while there is certainly nothing wrong with jamming with friends don't expect to much at this stage of the game.
#13
Quote by monwobobbo
honestly you're going to need way more time in than 2 months before being in a band is going to be a happening thing. you haven't mentioned learning any chords which are the building blocks of songs. you're going to spend way more time in a band playing rhythm than lead. as mentioned for band purposes you'll need a way better amp than the 2 you mentioned. try not to get to far ahead of yourself is the best advice i can give. while there is certainly nothing wrong with jamming with friends don't expect to much at this stage of the game.
Tbh when I said "In a band" I more meant later once my abilities have strenghtened. I have learned basic chords, power chords, barre chords, etc. At the moment I more meant that I'd like to just jam w/ friends honestly. Not performing for people. Especially since the people I play with know less than I do and refuse to learn some things (I.E. Guitarist friend won't learn chords/pentatonic scales, bassist won't practice anything on his own time, drummer just doesn't know what to practice so he doesn't)
#14
Quote by xenorae
I actually wanted to get into music theory more with a music theory class @ my school, but it's only AP music theory, and I can barely even read sheet music, so that was instantly out. Scales are just about all I can learn w/o sight reading I assume.


You'll probably want to get to learn to read sheet music anyway. I started out playing classical music on a pipe organ (ain't no tab for THAT stuff), so it was sort of a given. When I switched to guitar, it was a piece of quiche to sight-read whatever I was playing. The GUITAR playing wasn't a piece of quiche, mind you, but at least I know what note I was *supposed* to play. Guitar makes it interesting because there are two or three places that each note can be played, but tab DOES help with that.
#15
I am new to playing also and I find if I look at music I like and try to find something which I think I will find difficult to play, learn it. If you are having troubles with pull offs and you like Hendrix find a Hendrix lick with alot of pull offs. Don't know if its good advice but works for me
#17
check out justinguitar
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#18
I'm backing up the Fender Mustang idea. They're cheap, but they've got a GREAT reputation as far as modeling amps go. Another tip is if you're like me, you'll have to practice on low volumes a lot, so a solid state with a nice low volume, high gain distortion will be useful. I accomplish this through a 60 Watt Solid State 1x12 with an ElectroHarmonix Metal Muff With Top Boost going through it.
Quote by Roc8995
Yes, and people still got polio and you had to crank your car up by hand and put whale oil in the lamps every night.

Things are better now.


Quote by dannyalcatraz
Style is in the hands. Taste is in the hands. But tone? Tone is in the gear.
#19
This entire thread is a TL;DR to be honest, but the one thing I've got to say is, since you have a knack for theory, keep going. It will pay off. Including modes, contrary to that other guy's opinion.