#1
Just thinking of some story's my Dad told me growing up and thought it would be a good thread. One of my favorites is the reason behind Led Zeppelin's name, someone (some say Keith Moon) said that if Robert Plant formed a new band it would go down like a lead balloon hence "Led Zeppelin". If you know any facts or myths post it
#2
Fact: this thread is butts.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#3
The Myth of Sisyphus

by Albert Camus


The gods had condemned Sisyphus to ceaselessly rolling a rock to the top of a mountain, whence the stone would fall back of its own weight. They had thought with some reason that there is no more dreadful punishment than futile and hopeless labor.

If one believes Homer, Sisyphus was the wisest and most prudent of mortals. According to another tradition, however, he was disposed to practice the profession of highwayman. I see no contradiction in this. Opinions differ as to the reasons why he became the futile laborer of the underworld. To begin with, he is accused of a certain levity in regard to the gods. He stole their secrets. Egina, the daughter of Esopus, was carried off by Jupiter. The father was shocked by that disappearance and complained to Sisyphus. He, who knew of the abduction, offered to tell about it on condition that Esopus would give water to the citadel of Corinth. To the celestial thunderbolts he preferred the benediction of water. He was punished for this in the underworld. Homer tells us also that Sisyphus had put Death in chains. Pluto could not endure the sight of his deserted, silent empire. He dispatched the god of war, who liberated Death from the hands of her conqueror.

It is said that Sisyphus, being near to death, rashly wanted to test his wife's love. He ordered her to cast his unburied body into the middle of the public square. Sisyphus woke up in the underworld. And there, annoyed by an obedience so contrary to human love, he obtained from Pluto permission to return to earth in order to chastise his wife. But when he had seen again the face of this world, enjoyed water and sun, warm stones and the sea, he no longer wanted to go back to the infernal darkness. Recalls, signs of anger, warnings were of no avail. Many years more he lived facing the curve of the gulf, the sparkling sea, and the smiles of earth. A decree of the gods was necessary. Mercury came and seized the impudent man by the collar and, snatching him from his joys, lead him forcibly back to the underworld, where his rock was ready for him.

You have already grasped that Sisyphus is the absurd hero. He is, as much through his passions as through his torture. His scorn of the gods, his hatred of death, and his passion for life won him that unspeakable penalty in which the whole being is exerted toward accomplishing nothing. This is the price that must be paid for the passions of this earth. Nothing is told us about Sisyphus in the underworld. Myths are made for the imagination to breathe life into them. As for this myth, one sees merely the whole effort of a body straining to raise the huge stone, to roll it, and push it up a slope a hundred times over; one sees the face screwed up, the cheek tight against the stone, the shoulder bracing the clay-covered mass, the foot wedging it, the fresh start with arms outstretched, the wholly human security of two earth-clotted hands. At the very end of his long effort measured by skyless space and time without depth, the purpose is achieved. Then Sisyphus watches the stone rush down in a few moments toward tlower world whence he will have to push it up again toward the summit. He goes back down to the plain.

It is during that return, that pause, that Sisyphus interests me. A face that toils so close to stones is already stone itself! I see that man going back down with a heavy yet measured step toward the torment of which he will never know the end. That hour like a breathing-space which returns as surely as his suffering, that is the hour of consciousness. At each of those moments when he leaves the heights and gradually sinks toward the lairs of the gods, he is superior to his fate. He is stronger than his rock.

If this myth is tragic, that is because its hero is conscious. Where would his torture be, indeed, if at every step the hope of succeeding upheld him? The workman of today works everyday in his life at the same tasks, and his fate is no less absurd. But it is tragic only at the rare moments when it becomes conscious. Sisyphus, proletarian of the gods, powerless and rebellious, knows the whole extent of his wretched condition: it is what he thinks of during his descent. The lucidity that was to constitute his torture at the same time crowns his victory. There is no fate that can not be surmounted by scorn.

If the descent is thus sometimes performed in sorrow, it can also take place in joy. This word is not too much. Again I fancy Sisyphus returning toward his rock, and the sorrow was in the beginning. When the images of earth cling too tightly to memory, when the call of happiness becomes too insistent, it happens that melancholy arises in man's heart: this is the rock's victory, this is the rock itself. The boundless grief is too heavy to bear. These are our nights of Gethsemane. But crushing truths perish from being acknowledged. Thus, Edipus at the outset obeys fate without knowing it. But from the moment he knows, his tragedy begins. Yet at the same moment, blind and desperate, he realizes that the only bond linking him to the world is the cool hand of a girl. Then a tremendous remark rings out: "Despite so many ordeals, my advanced age and the nobility of my soul make me conclude that all is well." Sophocles' Edipus, like Dostoevsky's Kirilov, thus gives the recipe for the absurd victory. Ancient wisdom confirms modern heroism.

One does not discover the absurd without being tempted to write a manual of happiness. "What!---by such narrow ways--?" There is but one world, however. Happiness and the absurd are two sons of the same earth. They are inseparable. It would be a mistake to say that happiness necessarily springs from the absurd. Discovery. It happens as well that the felling of the absurd springs from happiness. "I conclude that all is well," says Edipus, and that remark is sacred. It echoes in the wild and limited universe of man. It teaches that all is not, has not been, exhausted. It drives out of this world a god who had come into it with dissatisfaction and a preference for futile suffering. It makes of fate a human matter, which must be settled among men.

All Sisyphus' silent joy is contained therein. His fate belongs to him. His rock is a thing. Likewise, the absurd man, when he contemplates his torment, silences all the idols. In the universe suddenly restored to its silence, the myriad wondering little voices of the earth rise up. Unconscious, secret calls, invitations from all the faces, they are the necessary reverse and price of victory. There is no sun without shadow, and it is essential to know the night. The absurd man says yes and his efforts will henceforth be unceasing. If there is a personal fate, there is no higher destiny, or at least there is, but one which he concludes is inevitable and despicable. For the rest, he knows himself to be the master of his days. At that subtle moment when man glances backward over his life, Sisyphus returning toward his rock, in that slight pivoting he contemplates that series of unrelated actions which become his fate, created by him, combined under his memory's eye and soon sealed by his death. Thus, convinced of the wholly human origin of all that is human, a blind man eager to see who knows that the night has no end, he is still on the go. The rock is still rolling.

I leave Sisyphus at the foot of the mountain! One always finds one's burden again. But Sisyphus teaches the higher fidelity that negates the gods and raises rocks. He too concludes that all is well. This universe henceforth without a master seems to him neither sterile nor futile. Each atom of that stone, each mineral flake of that night filled mountain, in itself forms a world. The struggle itself toward the heights is enough to fill a man's heart. One must imagine Sisyphus happy.
В словах есть что-то неприличное.
#4
Sam kissed a guy in front of a child to show them what kissing was.
Quote by jakesmellspoo
ooh look at me i'm ERIKLENSHERR and i work at fancy pants desk jobs and wear ties and ply barely legal girls with weed and booze i'm such a classy motherfucker.
#5
The Pit was good once.

Music was better when I was a teenager.

I wasn't always a dick.
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#6
John Belushi once told Carrie Fisher that she's doing too much drugs.

Quote by slapsymcdougal
The Pit was good once.

Music was better when I was a teenager.

I wasn't always a dick.


True

Somewhat true

False
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
#7
Will Ferrell and John C Reilly are stage names of Chad Smith and Flea.

Quote by slapsymcdougal
You can tell if it's eager, because you put your hand down her pants and it feels like a horse eating oats.

Nicest compliment on my looks:
Quote by slapsymcdougal
Putting the 'sex' in 'convicted sex offender'.
#8
Sam kissed a dude at his bachelor party.
Quote by jakesmellspoo
ooh look at me i'm ERIKLENSHERR and i work at fancy pants desk jobs and wear ties and ply barely legal girls with weed and booze i'm such a classy motherfucker.
#9
Learned these yesterday...

The band Green Jellÿ (known for their heavy metal, modernized version of the fairy tale "Three Little Pigs") is actually pronounced "Green Jell-O" (due to the "ÿ"). Their name was originally Green Jello, but Kraft Foods tried to sue them in the late-80's/early-90's for copyright infringement. So, they changed the spelling of the band name, but kept the pronunciation. They called themselves Green Jello because the band thought that green (lime-flavored) Jell-o was the worst, and the band initially sucked. In fact, they sucked so bad that the bassist had to color-code the frets on his bass so he could learn basslines by color, because it was too musically-inept to learn them by ear or note.

Also, the most interesting part (in my opinion, at least) is that, on the track "Three Little Pigs", some of the backing-vocals (the falsetto line, "not by the hair of my chinny-chin-chin") is sung by Maynard James Keenan (from Tool, duh), and the drummer of that track, and the entire album, was Danny Carey (also from Tool).
Quote by SForbz-Rockstar
They weren't homeless they were just Grunge.
#10
Quote by Guitar0player
John Belushi once told Carrie Fisher that she's doing too much drugs.


True

Somewhat true

False

Third one is actually true, I was a cvnt until 1994.
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#11
Quote by slapsymcdougal
Third one is actually true, I was a cvnt until 1994.


You were never really a dick or a ****, a smart aleck at best I think.
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
#12
Quote by Zaphikh
The Myth of Sisyphus



I suppose it's messed up that I enjoyed reading that...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#13
Quote by Guitar0player
You were never really a dick or a ****, a smart aleck at best I think.

Thanks for devaluing my only achievements in life.
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#15
Fun fact about the time I caught the ferry to Shelbyville. I needed a new heel for m'shoe. So I decided to go to Morganville, which is what they called Shelbyville in those days. So I tied an onion to my belt, which was the style at the time. Now, to take the ferry cost a nickel, and in those days, nickels had pictures of bumblebees on 'em. "Gimme five bees for a quarter," you'd say. Now where were we... oh yeah. The important thing was that I had an onion on my belt, which was the style at the time. I didn't have any white onions, because of the war. The only thing you could get was those big yellow ones...
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#16
Quote by slapsymcdougal
Fun fact about the time I caught the ferry to Shelbyville. I needed a new heel for m'shoe. So I decided to go to Morganville, which is what they called Shelbyville in those days. So I tied an onion to my belt, which was the style at the time. Now, to take the ferry cost a nickel, and in those days, nickels had pictures of bumblebees on 'em. "Gimme five bees for a quarter," you'd say. Now where were we... oh yeah. The important thing was that I had an onion on my belt, which was the style at the time. I didn't have any white onions, because of the war. The only thing you could get was those big yellow ones...

#18
Quote by UltimateGuizar
No more tears shampoo is a myth.
I used to drink tons of that stuff and it never cheered me up.

Beyond the promise of a mere shampoo.
#19
heroin is a brand name for an opiate from the late 19th and early 20th century.
A poem.
Quote by yoman297
no girl, movember isnt for you. shave your stache pls

I can out-bore you any day
#20
Quote by slapsymcdougal
Thanks for devaluing my only achievements in life.


I was trying to compliment you actually. You are one of the wiser and nicer people I encountered here.
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
#21
Quote by Arby911
I suppose it's messed up that I enjoyed reading that...

I thought it was fantastic. A revolt against the absurdity of existing; to stare misery in the face and to push through.
Quote by slapsymcdougal
"Gimme five bees for a quarter," you'd say.

Times were simpler then..
В словах есть что-то неприличное.
#22
Quote by Pastafarian96
heroin is a brand name for an opiate from the late 19th and early 20th century.


the company who first put heroin on the market, Bayer, make all of my diabetes equipment, no shit. (They're also a ****ed up company and sell defective medicine in the third world and should all be killed)
Death comes as the harsh victory of the law of our ancestors over the dimension of our becoming ~monsieur dupont, Nihilist Communism

please listen to Dingo and TRON MAXIMUM !!
#23
Quote by LauraMarx
the company who first put heroin on the market, Bayer, make all of my diabetes equipment, no shit. (They're also a ****ed up company and sell defective medicine in the third world and should all be killed)


about heroin.
A poem.
Quote by yoman297
no girl, movember isnt for you. shave your stache pls

I can out-bore you any day
#24
Quote by Guitar0player
I was trying to compliment you actually. You are one of the wiser and nicer people I encountered here.

Yikes.
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#28
Quote by LauraMarx
the company who first put heroin on the market, Bayer, make all of my diabetes equipment, no shit. (They're also a ****ed up company and sell defective medicine in the third world and should all be killed)


I think you should quit using their equipment, it's a moral imperative.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#30
^ that is just bat shit mad.

Probably not a fun fact for those around him but King Louis XIV only took 3 baths during his lifetime.

US President James Garfield could write in latin with one hand and greek with the other at the same time.
#31
When Krakatoa erupted in 1883, there are reliable reports the noise was audible 3,000 miles away. Barographs worldwide were able to detect the changes in air pressure caused by the eruption.
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#32
When I was a young boy, my father took me into the city to see a marching band.
GEEYUR :

X) Schecter Tempest Custom f/w SD SH-6

X) Ibanez RG321MH f/w SD SH-11

X) AMT Pangea CP-100 ( AWWW YIS )

X) Line 6 POD HD 500X


When you licky-bum-bum so hard you get sticky num-nums.
#33
The letter 'a' is banned in Tuvalu.

The real king of Swaziland is technically a cat.

Choking on sand while sleeping is the leading cause of death in Mauritania.
WHAT A
HORRIBLE
NIGHT TO
HAVE A
CURSE.
#34
Quote by Axelfox
Dr. Carson made most medicines that are around.


For such a "brilliant" surgeon, all of his views on social, political, economic, and philosophical issues are absolutely absurd. He's kind of trash in many ways.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.