#1
Please help me with easy detail. Those result I found on google does really turn me off.

They talking about tonic and stuff that I really tired to read.
I just google for top chord progression and I play along with those and it sound great but when I try to find the meaning of it, heck I don't understand.
#2
Unfortunately, to start answering your question, I'd need to use the kind of jargon that makes you "tired to read".
("Tonic" is not such a hard word. It just means "keynote" or "key chord".)

I suggest you start easy and slow, and work your way through a well-organised site like this one:
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons
Start at the beginning and don't skip anything. If you don't understand something, go back.
(Notice how they don't talk about chords until way down the page...)

If none of that seems to be about what you're asking, try rephrasing your question, or giving specific examples of what you don't understand (and want to understand!).
#3
Quote by jongtr
Unfortunately, to start answering your question, I'd need to use the kind of jargon that makes you "tired to read".
("Tonic" is not such a hard word. It just means "keynote" or "key chord".)

I suggest you start easy and slow, and work your way through a well-organised site like this one:
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons
Start at the beginning and don't skip anything. If you don't understand something, go back.
(Notice how they don't talk about chords until way down the page...)

If none of that seems to be about what you're asking, try rephrasing your question, or giving specific examples of what you don't understand (and want to understand!).


What I mean is I want to learn and understand about Chord Progression because it's essential but when I try to find a source that talk about it, the page is unattractive and somewhat make me discourage to learn and I just quit it.
Mostly people talking about their bio more than talking about the main part.
I just want a page where people just tell you "Chord pregression is..." and "Now I will teach you about it ...." Not someone talking about their life and their passion.
#4
Do you know about semitones, and about intervals? Everything comes from these. And these are dead easy to learn. Combined, you get chords. Different combinations give different chord types, (major, minor, maj7, m7b5, 7b9b5 ....) that sound stable to very unstable (clashy) as in the order just given. The more unstable, the more the ear wants to hear it move to a more stable chord. A chord progression can thus create different levels of stability to the listener.

A progression from one chord to the next may cause every note to change ... so stands out a lot. (e.g. C Dm) The two chords may share notes. The more they share, the more subtle the change. e.g C Em

A progression from one chord root to another chord root 5 semitones (5 frets on same string) higher, or 7 semitones lower creates a very strong sound. When this happens, very often there is just one shared note. The way the other notes of the outgoing chord are handled is very important ... typically moving to the nearest note of the incoming chord.

Usually, a writer will choose some scale type (very often major or natural minor). The scale type represents a pattern of intervals from the scale root. E.g, for major scale, using semitones, this pattern is (0, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 11). If you start the scale on G say (3rd fret, E string, the second scale note is 2 semitones higher (A) and the third scale note is 4 semitones higher than the start note (7th fret, B) and so on.

Often, chords are built by using a very simple rule (technically called "building in 3rds"). Non-technically, you can think of this as "choose-skip" repeated some number of times. Choose a scale note (e.g. the one 2 semitones above the start). Skip the next SCALE NOTE (ignore 4). Choose next (5). Ignore next (7). Choose next (9). Giving a chord with pitches found at (2, 5, 9) semitones above the chosen start note. Start from 4, say. You get (4, 7, 11). Measure distances from START OF EACH CHORD to get intervals in chord, hence chord type. So ...

For (2,5,9), 2 is its starting pitch (A, if we started major scale on G). 2=>5 is up 3. 2->9 is up 7. Any chord containing intervals of 3 and 7 semitones above its start (its root) is known as a "minor chord".

Try this, for (4,7,11). 4 its starting pitch (4 semitones above G, say). What's the distances from 4 to the other two? Is that what's needed for a minor chord?

And so on.

To handle "falling off the end", we need to add on the same pattern an octave higher (12 added to each of the original scale intervals) ...

(0 2 4 5 7 9 11 12 14 16 17 19 21 23).
Starting at 7, using choose-skip, you get (7, 11, 14). If 7 is the chord root, you get

7->11 is up 4 semitones. 7->14 is up 7 semitones. Giving a chord with intervals of 4 and 7 semitones above its root. AKA as a "major chord".

Try this for yourself, starting from each of the scale intervals (0 2 4 5 7 9 11). See what you find.

This set of chords are all derived from the scale intervals ... they are "found" in the scale ... technically, they are "diatonic" to the scale.

Exactly the same reasoning applies, regardless which pitch I choose for the scale start note (which we call the tonic) ... the distances between the scale intervals never changes, whereas the pitches that get picked out as a result do.

Hence, many chord progressions are purely diatonic. But they don't have to be.

Hopefully, this will get you started.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Aug 20, 2015,
#5
Quote by sosxradar
What I mean is I want to learn and understand about Chord Progression because it's essential but when I try to find a source that talk about it, the page is unattractive and somewhat make me discourage to learn and I just quit it.
Mostly people talking about their bio more than talking about the main part.
I just want a page where people just tell you "Chord pregression is..." and "Now I will teach you about it ...." Not someone talking about their life and their passion.
Do you know about key?

Is this is any use? Anything you don't understand here?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chord_progression
There's obviously a lot of jargon, but at least no one's talking about their "life and passion"... - and each jargon term has a link to its definition.
Last edited by jongtr at Aug 20, 2015,
#6
Well, to understand chord progressions, tonic is a pretty essential thing.

What I would suggest is learning about chord functions, ie the Roman numerals. After you have found the key, which is done by finding the tonic (it's the note that sounds like home - do it by ear), you look at what scale degrees the chords are built on. I chord is built on the first scale degree, II on the second, III on the third, and so on. Why we want to know about chord functions is because of the fact that the same function will always sound the same, no matter what key we are in. V chord will sound like the V chord in any key.

It is good to know the diatonic chords of a key. How to figure this out is by harmonizing the key scale. For example in C major you would start the C major scale with the 1st, 3rd and 5th note to figure out the triads.

R 3 5
C E G - I C
D F A - ii Dm
E G B - iii Em
F A C - IV F
G B D - V G
A C E - vi Am
B D F - viio Bdim

The chord qualities are the same for every major scale (ie, the I, IV and V chords are major, ii, iii and vi chords are minor and viio is diminished). Why? Because all major scales use the same formula - that's why they all sound the same.

You can do the same thing with the minor scale.


Now you know what chords belong to a key, and know how to figure it out. But not all chords the progressions are going to have belong to the key (many times they will, but a lot of songs have "out of key" chords). Those are called non-diatonic or borrowed chords. I'm telling you this so that you don't get confused the next time you see a chord that "shouldn't" be there. Certain non-diatonic chords are very common.

You'll learn about all of this best by just listening to songs and figuring out what kind of chord progressions they use. Think in Roman numerals, not just in chord names. Just listen to songs and figure out the chords. This way you'll understand how the chords are most commonly used. Anything that sounds good is good.

I would also pay attention to how the chords work with the melody.


Oh, and always use you ears. Pay attention to the sound. Learn songs by ear, rather than by looking at tabs or chord charts.
Quote by AlanHB
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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Aug 20, 2015,
#7
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Well, to understand chord progressions, tonic is a pretty essential thing.

Think in Roman numerals, not just in chord names. Just listen to songs and figure out the chords. This way you'll understand how the chords are most commonly used.


When we use a pattern of intervals, we're measuring from some chosen starting pitch to single out the pitches at these other intervals. Our start pitch may be the start of a scale (the tonic), the root of a chord (maybe found at one of the intervals in that scale), and even some arbitrary point.

When we measure from the tonic, then the Roman numeral system is another way of denoting interval distances, MEASURED FROM THAT TONIC.

distance from tonic == Roman numeral
----------------------------------------------
0 ............................ I
2 .............................II
4 .............................III
5 ............................. IV
7 .............................V
9 .............................VI
11 ...........................VII

A lot of folk also write the roman numeral in lowercase if the chord type built from that scale location is a minor-type chord. Also, some folk use "b" and "#" ... e.g. bIII, to indicate one semitone lower than III.

As MaggaMarine says, the beauty of this system is that you can now write about a chord progression generically (e.g. I IV V) ... depending on our choice of tonic, you'll create the same sounding effect, just "higher" or "lower".

So, on guitar ... if you know interval shapes ... and your chord shapes ... it becomes very easy to play a progression starting from any tonic. Just slide your hand up or down is one way of handling this.

This way, the actual pitches (names) involved are of very secondary importance.

cheers, Jerry
#8
^Just remember that if we are in a minor key, III and VI are 3 and 8 semitones away.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp