#1
Hello,
yesterday we were setting up our band practice room and we were having feedback issues. The volume of the acoustic drumset is fairly loud so we have to turn up our amps. As soon as we do that,the mic starts to go into feedback. What's the solution?
Thanks
#2
Turn the drum kit down - use light sticks, learn to play the drums rather than just bash them.

Turn the amps down.

You are practicing too loud.

Put the singer in another room.

Get a better mic (hyper or super cardoid).

Don't point you speakers at the mic.

Turn the guitar amps away from the singer.

Use headphones.
Last edited by PSimonR at Aug 19, 2015,
#3
Put the singer in another room? What kind of advice is that? The drumkit causes the feedback we noticed.
#4
Experiment with speaker placement and orientation. Also, are you using cheap mikes? That could be the root cause.
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#5
Quote by Jayerrr
Put the singer in another room? What kind of advice is that? The drumkit causes the feedback we noticed.


We put the drums and amps on one side of the room and us on the otherside facing all that. The mikes are pointed AWAY from the drums. If you don't have soundproofing foam, hang a bunch of those big thick moving blankets up behind you. That helps prevent sound bouncing off a wall behind you and into the mikes.

Put the amps up on stands/boxes.

Whatever you do, do NOT practice with the drums and amps behind you and the amps on the floor and the mikes facing all of that.

Honestly, my preference is to practice with the drums and amps (if necessary) in a separate room altogether, recording style. And truth be told, it works better if we're not using amps at all, and running modelers/preamps direct into a PA mixer and out to headphones.
#6
Quote by Cathbard
Also, are you using cheap mikes? That could be the root cause.


Yup, huge difference.
#7
Quote by Jayerrr
Put the singer in another room? What kind of advice is that? The drumkit causes the feedback we noticed.


That's excellent advice. If you remove the vocal mikes from anywhere near the drums, you can't get feedback.
#8
Not sure who this 'Mike' is but he sounds like a trouble maker! I suggest that you get rid of him and replace him with a guy who knows how best to position the mics to avoid feedback
#9
Use cardiod or supercardiod dynamic microphones. A personal favorite of mine is the shure beta57. Turn the gain down low for the microphone, and apply a high pass filter (low cut below 100hz, at least). When you sing, get really close to the microphone as if youre almost kissing it. Getting close like this assures that the vocals are the loudest sound source hitting the mic; the reason you need to cut out a lot of bass is to compensate for the proximity effect of singing so closely. I also like to boost around 2.5khz and 7khz on the vocals to help them cut in the jam space. A decent mixer will allow you to do all of this
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#10
Quote by SpiderM
Not sure who this 'Mike' is but he sounds like a trouble maker! I suggest that you get rid of him and replace him with a guy who knows how best to position the mics to avoid feedback


Mike has been an accepted shorthand way of referring to a microphone pretty much since they were invented. Mic is also acceptable alternative, but much more recently on the scene, and not a replacement. Here's a NY Times article about the debate over usage, but it notes that "mike" precedes the use of "mic" by several decades and is still in very active use.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/01/magazine/01-onlanguage-t.html?_r=0

You may find that there are people on the forum who've been positioning "mikes" well before your daddy positioned your mama in preparation for your conception.

In any case, you'll probably want to avoid passive/aggressive correction of usage in the future.
Last edited by dspellman at Aug 20, 2015,
#11
Well, first of all thanks for your answers. The mic I'm using is a Sennheiser E945. We have our amps one one side and we stand on the other but the drums are on the other side, I should move them to where the amps are I think. Why do we have to put the amps on stands?
Thanks
#12
Quote by Jayerrr
Well, first of all thanks for your answers. The mic I'm using is a Sennheiser E945. We have our amps one one side and we stand on the other but the drums are on the other side, I should move them to where the amps are I think. Why do we have to put the amps on stands?
Thanks


If you have microphones that have a distinct pattern, you want to avoid having the drums fall within that pattern. This is why you see drummers surrounded by plex barriers, or using electronic drum kits, or muted somehow on stage, as well.

When you're actually onstage, you'll want to keep stage volume as low as possible. While the "old" way of doing things was to have all amps blaring, all that noise finds its way into vocal mikes and out through the PA. The problem is that you end up with several different sources of sound arriving at your audience's ears at different times, and the result is a sonic slop. When the sound guys attempt to cut back the clutter entering the microphones, they end up tweaking the singers as well. Not good.

Amps on stands are aimed more at your ears than at your calves. You get to hear what you're actually playing and at a different volume than if you'd left the amp on the floor. In addition, you help to eliminate random acoustic and mechanical coupling, and that means that your sound will be more repeatable. And finally, since most guitar amps beam treble to one degree or another, your amp on a stand is closer to what your audience is hearing than what you hear if you're off axis as much as you are with the amp on the floor and your ears five feet off-axis.
#13
What speakers and mixer do you use?

If you can get your hand on some sound insulation, toss that up around the room, just put it in a bedsheet first or it'll be itchy as hell. Thick blankets also work decent.
..I was watching my death.
#14
Quote by dspellman
Mike has been an accepted shorthand way of referring to a microphone pretty much since they were invented. Mic is also acceptable alternative, but much more recently on the scene, and not a replacement. Here's a NY Times article about the debate over usage, but it notes that "mike" precedes the use of "mic" by several decades and is still in very active use.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/01/magazine/01-onlanguage-t.html?_r=0

You may find that there are people on the forum who've been positioning "mikes" well before your daddy positioned your mama in preparation for your conception.

In any case, you'll probably want to avoid passive/aggressive correction of usage in the future.


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#15
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#16
Quote by dspellman
Mike has been an accepted shorthand way of referring to a microphone pretty much since they were invented. Mic is also acceptable alternative, but much more recently on the scene, and not a replacement. Here's a NY Times article about the debate over usage, but it notes that "mike" precedes the use of "mic" by several decades and is still in very active use.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/01/magazine/01-onlanguage-t.html?_r=0

You may find that there are people on the forum who've been positioning "mikes" well before your daddy positioned your mama in preparation for your conception.

In any case, you'll probably want to avoid passive/aggressive correction of usage in the future.


I think you may have taken that a little too seriously fella! ;-)
Last edited by SpiderM at Aug 20, 2015,
#17
Quote by SpiderM
I think you may have taken that a little too seriously fella! ;-)


Always a possibility.

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#19
If the jam room is small then sound deadening will play a massive part. Try simply hanging curtains/blankets on the wall that the PA speakers are facing.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#20
Lots of good suggestions so far. If the drums are still too loud, encourage your drummer to use the Ringo method to mute them down. You will lose some of the attack but still get the energy of a rock drummer but 20db lower volume.

http://www.ringosbeatlekits.com/Muffling_Techniques.html
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY