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#1
I look at some people on youtube and I just know that I will never reach that level. Also in the harder area of somo solos, with some tapping and legato it's taking me an extremely long time to get things down if I even get them at all.

I wonder if there is a limit in how good you can actually get. If person A spends 500 hours on guitar and so does person B one might end up streaks better than another.

I guess where does talent come in and practice time and commitment end?
#2
No way to know.
I can tell you that different things come at different rates, with some things tough at first and then suddenly getting much easier, almost as if a switch were thrown.

Never assume that you're nearing the end of your progress. Keep plugging.
#3
These sort of threads come up fairly regularly. But be careful as they can get argumentative/discouraging.

If you practise regularly and practice well you will become a good player and get lots of satisfaction.
#4
Quote by dspellman
No way to know.
I can tell you that different things come at different rates, with some things tough at first and then suddenly getting much easier, almost as if a switch were thrown.

Never assume that you're nearing the end of your progress. Keep plugging.


Id like to add to this by saying, i know it really seems that way and it is partially true. Think about how people have different styles....George Lynch sounds the way he does and is iconic for his extremely wide/controlled vibrato while some other players have a fast not so on pitch vibrato (im talking to you Kirk Hammet)
Doesn't necessarily mean anyone is better or worse its the individual style that is far more significant in my book.

I could play Vinnie Moores Meltdown note for note 100% accurately but that in no way means i will sound like Vinnie.

So yes/no.

There are physical limitations in some cases though.
#5
No one is allowed to be better than John Petrucci, otherwise he will enter World Domination Mode and melt you with infinite notes per milisecond.

Now that we got the obvious out of the way, I don't think there are any limits - in terms of playing fast, then just like everything else, people constantly push boundaries (random analogy - look at sports and records constantly being beaten, I think it's something like this). Overall, however, it's impossible to measure "good" and truly compare any guitarist with another, as there's so many different areas to look at, and even then, as said above, "good" is relative. There are guitarists with technique which is supposed to be horrible according to classic theory and approach, and yet they give it a distinctive charm. (I can't imagine Steven Wilson without him strumming chords aggressively with his whole arm. Just no way.)
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
There's no point in trying to convince a moron.
#6
Quote by MyOceanToSwim

I guess where does talent come in and practice time and commitment end?

Talent can take you as far as it can take you.
Practice will take you as far as it can, if you work at it.

You need both to be truly great, but with enough of either, you can sound pretty good and have fun.

Me? I have talent, but I don't practice NEARLY enough to "justify my gear" or anything like that.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#7
I don't think there is a limit. But it is proven that the younger you are the quicker you can learn. So if someone age 10 and someone age 30 start at the same time then the 10yr old should get better more quickly.

I suspect people hit plateau's when they don't know what they need to practice to improve. You should think big and aim to reach your goals. Don't get disheartened, get inspired.
#8
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Talent can take you as far as it can take you.
Practice will take you as far as it can, if you work at it.

You need both to be truly great, but with enough of either, you can sound pretty good and have fun.

Me? I have talent, but I don't practice NEARLY enough to "justify my gear" or anything like that.


agree. personally i think everyone does have a limit but where that is isn't gong to be obvious. i spent years trying to do the shred thing (back in the 80s) and never really even came close to mastering it. i did discover that perhaps my "talents" lied in other areas of playing though. once i started to persue those more i became a much happier player. now of course i never did give up on the more shred orientated playing but rather made that a secondary thing. i'll never be steve vai or yngwie malmsteen and that's fine more worried about being the best me.
#9
Geez, I can't shred for more than a couple of seconds before I lose the tempo...and the pitch...and where the hell I'm supposed to be in the song...and any semblance of taste...

My talents? One of my favorite complements I ever got about my guitar playing was "you play fancy rhythm guitar."
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#10
Quote by monwobobbo
agree. personally i think everyone does have a limit but where that is isn't gong to be obvious. i spent years trying to do the shred thing (back in the 80s) and never really even came close to mastering it. i did discover that perhaps my "talents" lied in other areas of playing though. once i started to persue those more i became a much happier player. now of course i never did give up on the more shred orientated playing but rather made that a secondary thing. i'll never be steve vai or yngwie malmsteen and that's fine more worried about being the best me.



I think this was what i was trying to say but couldbt articulate it as well. Nice job.
#11
Quote by Dick Savage
I think this was what i was trying to say but couldbt articulate it as well. Nice job.


thanx.
#12
There is a hard physical limit to how much time your body can practice. Some of the best shredders spent their teen years practicing almost nonstop when they weren’t in class, and continued that into their twenties. Many peoples hands cannot tolerate that much activity. Calluses, blisters, muscle soreness, and RSIs are common problems that end musical careers prematurely. But Mozart was able to practice so much (albeit not by choice) that his fingers were deformed by the time he hit adulthood.

Then there are just the realities of talent. I can practice all day and I’ll still be half tone deaf. I’ll never be able to do some of the things Hendrix or Buckhead have because my fingers aren’t that long. And talent often coincides with mental illness and a predilection for drub abuse, which is why some musicians go crazy or OD young.
#13
Quote by SpiderM
If you practise regularly and practice well you will become a good player and get lots of satisfaction.


Some people can't get no satisfaction though. I'm just playing. I liked this enough to sig.
Quote by Roc8995
Yes, and people still got polio and you had to crank your car up by hand and put whale oil in the lamps every night.

Things are better now.


Quote by dannyalcatraz
Style is in the hands. Taste is in the hands. But tone? Tone is in the gear.
#15
Quote by GraceByDeath
Some people can't get no satisfaction though. I'm just playing. I liked this enough to sig.


I think we are both a little late with those lyrics!
#16
Quote by jpnyc
Also, don’t forget that you’ll never get great tone without pedals:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dwEsjN6BEaE


hmmm..... damn should have known that only a vintage 808 would have mojo. enough with these modern attempts to duplicate the mojo.

funny vid. oh good thing i have a box full of pedals
#17
As we have argued before....There are those who are in the "pull yourself up by the bootstraps" school who think that hard work and practice conquers all.

I maintain that hard work and practice will take you as far as you individually can go, but unless you have various innate skills and talents, not everyone can achieve the highest levels.
Just as in the case with any other field....There are many talented sprinters, but only one consistently wins...

There is that notion of different types of "intelligences"......Pretty popular in the scientific community. The idea that we have specific hard-wiring for specific skills....Mathematics, spacial-temporal, interpersonal, etc.
We all know folks who are say, very good at math and perhaps dummies at finding their way around the city.
A good used-car salesman may have terrific interpersonal skills but if he doesn't have good "spacial" skills he'd have trouble tuning the car up...

That sort of thing. We all know of the various sorts of prodigies....Individuals who exhibit great talent at an early age with little or no training, and even brain-damaged or developmentally-disabled folks who have remarkable musical abilities...But little else.
#18
Quote by jpnyc
Also, don’t forget that you’ll never get great tone without pedals:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dwEsjN6BEaE

Hitler needs to work on his left hand muting

I don't believe there's a limit to how far you can get, I think that's total bullshit. As long as you continue to practice you can always continue to improve. However, people will progress at different rates, and people focus on different skills. My guitar teacher has been playing for something like two decades and he can shred like anything; I'm not as good as him but he hasn't got shit on my thumb-over-neck chording And within himself, too - he's told me about how, when he focuses on economy picking, his alternate picking suffers. Just how it goes. I mean, maybe, just maybe, there's a concrete limit on what we can do, and certainly there are physical limits on some things, but I don't believe anyone alive right now has the potential to approach a cap on their possible "skill" at guitar.
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Youre officially uber shit now.

Quote by StewieSwan
3d9310rd is far more upset than i 

Quote by Bladez22
I'm a moron tho apparently and everyone should listen to you oh wise pretentious one
#19
F'ck the desire for world conquest. We are all wired differently so find your inner strengths and be your own amazing self. If you do it well you will create something truly unique. Too many of us are like lemmings, following someone else's dream, only to end in disillusionment.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#20
Everyone has some sort of physical limitations on some level. You can practice running 18 hours a day and still be terrible at it compared to an Olympic athlete who was born with the right bone and muscle structure. Speed is not just determined by practice, biology imposes it's own limits. That's why some kids are shredding like mad at age 12 while others need to practice for twenty years before they even get close. It's also why many players, Satriani, Vai , Malmsteen etc, are not playing notably better than they were in their twenties, even though they play and tour like crazy.

That being said, the best players in the world put in tons of practice time. Paco Delucia, arguably the most technically proficient guitarist in history, would put in like 12 hours per day from age 4 ( or something to that effect) - which is why he could fingerpick as fast as John McLaughlin and Al Diemola could flatpick, which is absolutely insane.

I think there is a sort of biological cap to speed but very few would ever attain it since it would require enormous practice time to even get there.
#21
Quote by dspellman
No way to know.
I can tell you that different things come at different rates, with some things tough at first and then suddenly getting much easier, almost as if a switch were thrown.

Never assume that you're nearing the end of your progress. Keep plugging.


+1
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#22
Quote by MyOceanToSwim
I look at some people on youtube and I just know that I will never reach that level. Also in the harder area of somo solos, with some tapping and legato it's taking me an extremely long time to get things down if I even get them at all.

I wonder if there is a limit in how good you can actually get. If person A spends 500 hours on guitar and so does person B one might end up streaks better than another.

I guess where does talent come in and practice time and commitment end?



I'm not the one to believe in talent. Of course there's some things that come to others more easily, but I find the whole "I don't have talent so I can't do it as good, as this guy" Argument to be nothing, but a mere repetitive excuse as to why you can't do something. The only real limitations are the ones that you place upon yourself mentally. I feel as if a lot of people just stick to their comfort zone, and never go beyond it because they "deem" something to be challenging, to them. In order to make progress you have to continually reach out of your comfort zone, and that's a never ending process especially when it comes down to music.


There's an endless amount of styles out there to learn that you can apply to your skill set. Everyone learns in different ways, but if you find the method that you learn best with then you'll make progress pretty fast if you're disciplined. Those guitarist on youtube might only be showing their strengths, but you'll never know where their weakness lies if they don't show it..


Don't compare yourself to others that will just ultimately lead to your downfall in life. Just focus on what you can, and can't do; and make sure to constantly strive to be a better guitarist. Human potential is infinite in what anyone can achieve. It's always as far, as you want to take it, and that my friend is a never ending endeavor.

Last edited by Black_devils at Aug 20, 2015,
#23
It's in the Midi-Chlorians. Jedi Master Qui-Gon explains:

""The boy nodded his understanding. "Can I ask you something?" The Jedi Master nodded. "What are midi-chlorians?"
Wind whipped at Qui-Gon's long hair, blowing strands of it across his strong face. "Midi-chlorians are microscopic life-forms that reside within the cells of all living things and communicate with the Force."
"They live inside of me?" the boy asked.
"In your cells." Qui-Gon paused. "We are symbionts with the midi-chlorians."
"Symbi-what?"
"Symbionts. Life-forms living together for mutual advantage. Without the midi-chlorians, life could not exist, and we would have no knowledge of the Force. Our midi-chlorians continually speak to us, Annie, telling us the will of the Force."
"They do?"
Qui-Gon cocked one eyebrow. "When you learn to quiet your mind, you will hear them speaking to you."
Anakin thought about it for a moment, then frowned. "I don't understand."
Qui-Gon smiled, and his eyes were warm and secretive. "With time and training, Annie, you will."
....""

apparently if the Force is weak within you, you will suck. and if the Force is strong within you, we will all know your name and "dirty leg women" will long for your flesh.
Last edited by ad_works at Aug 20, 2015,
#24
Quote by Bikewer
I maintain that hard work and practice will take you as far as you individually can go, but unless you have various innate skills and talents, not everyone can achieve the highest levels.
Just as in the case with any other field....There are many talented sprinters, but only one consistently wins...


This doesn't mean much though. Sure only one can win. There's still 9 other runners not that far behind. The difference is negligible.

Quote by Bikewer

There is that notion of different types of "intelligences"......Pretty popular in the scientific community. The idea that we have specific hard-wiring for specific skills....Mathematics, spacial-temporal, interpersonal, etc.
We all know folks who are say, very good at math and perhaps dummies at finding their way around the city.
A good used-car salesman may have terrific interpersonal skills but if he doesn't have good "spacial" skills he'd have trouble tuning the car up...

That sort of thing. We all know of the various sorts of prodigies....Individuals who exhibit great talent at an early age with little or no training, and even brain-damaged or developmentally-disabled folks who have remarkable musical abilities...But little else.


I agree that some people are definitely wired to be more proficient at certain things, but the brain is an ever changing organ. If you work at and strengthen the neural pathways for a particular area you will get better at it.

Someone with a natural talent for maths who rarely studies it is not going to be as good as someone who doesn't have that natural talent but does study.

We need to be careful so as not to get discouraged and give ourselves excuses as to why we can't become professional guitarists. Really the only thing preventing that fact is our own thinking.

Talent might be the difference between professional and legend, but a lack of it shouldn't prevent anyone at becoming very good at their instrument.
#25
Quote by gweddle.nz

Someone with a natural talent for maths who rarely studies it is not going to be as good as someone who doesn't have that natural talent but does study.


that depends on how talented and untalented the two people are, and how much work the untalented one puts in.

I came across this the other day. Interesting.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140728094258.htm
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#26
Quote by Dave_Mc
that depends on how talented and untalented the two people are, and how much work the untalented one puts in.

I came across this the other day. Interesting.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140728094258.htm


interesting read. of course it's a pretty basic article that skims over things without much detail.

i've already stated that i'm a firm believer in talent. i fit was just a matter of practice then after 35+ years of playing i should be a guitar god. clearly i'm not. rather than be discouraged when i didn't turn out to be the next vai or malmsteen i took a closer look at my playing. the other thing i did was to really start to pay attention to what others liked about my playing. after a while certain elements were repeatedly praised (finger vibrato, certain phrasing etc). funny thing about much of what was praised is that they weren't things that were "practiced" per se but rather things that had developed naturally through time. i then did take the time to work on these elements of my playing and found that i was a happier player and did get better. sure i still practice weaknesses but i'd rather focus more energy on strengths. i also found when i didn't sweat my weaknesses as much and just took the time to get better and incorporate that in to my playing that again i made better progress.
#27
I enjoy the nurture versus nature debate as much as anyone - truth is - we are not all born equal, some are better attuned to certain activities, or disadvantaged. IMHO, a bit of classical training never did anyone any harm, no matter what style they are aiming to master, but the key to real mastery is in learning your strengths.
Love it, you'll be better at it - but don't forget practice and discipline!
And always remember, the most successful guitarists in the world aren't always the Vai's and Yngwie's actually most are the likes of The Edge, Gilmour and McCartney ..... hardly shredders.....
#28
Quote by monwobobbo
(a) interesting read. of course it's a pretty basic article that skims over things without much detail.

(b) i've already stated that i'm a firm believer in talent. i fit was just a matter of practice then after 35+ years of playing i should be a guitar god. clearly i'm not. rather than be discouraged when i didn't turn out to be the next vai or malmsteen i took a closer look at my playing. the other thing i did was to really start to pay attention to what others liked about my playing. after a while certain elements were repeatedly praised (finger vibrato, certain phrasing etc). funny thing about much of what was praised is that they weren't things that were "practiced" per se but rather things that had developed naturally through time. i then did take the time to work on these elements of my playing and found that i was a happier player and did get better. sure i still practice weaknesses but i'd rather focus more energy on strengths. i also found when i didn't sweat my weaknesses as much and just took the time to get better and incorporate that in to my playing that again i made better progress.


(a) yeah absolutely, I think it mentions where you can get the original paper but if it's like most academic stuff you have to pay a pretty steep price

I also thought that it was interesting that they said that when they actually checked how much practise people were doing, there was even less of a correlation. I certainly wouldn't suggest that the "work hard like me or you're lazy" brigade is full of it, but a less charitable person might.

I think it depends on what your initial prejudice is, really- the work hard brigade overstates how much work they're doing and ignores or minimises how much talent they had initially, while the talent brigade tends to do the opposite. Be very suspicious and skeptical when listening to what people say, in other words.

(b) yeah definitely. it's very interesting- some people are adamant that you should practise your weaknesses to get better, while others swear by ignoring them and practising what you're good at to get really good at it.

I sort of sit on the fence, as usual. I think it depends on what you're bad at (if it's "chords", then you kind of need to practise that, if it's one very specific sub-genre of music which isn't that popular you probably can ignore it), and what your aims are (if you want to get famous you're probably more likely to get famous if you are really good at one thing, whereas if you want to be in a cover band being decent at a wide range of stuff is likely more important).
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#29
Time limits us all, and we improve at different rates. But our potential is endless, other than that.

It's kind of like if we were all carpenters, and some of us have better tools in our workshop than others.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Aug 21, 2015,
#30
Three things are required to be highly successful at anything:
1. Innate ability
2. Passion
3. Determination and effort

Success really requires all three, which is why very high levels of success in any activity is really quite rare.

I am pretty clear about my natural talents and am more passionate about some activities than others. Applying determination and effort to the things we already have both talent and passion for yield the fastest results. The highest success reward per hours of effort. Applying effort and determination to something we have neither talent or passion for leads to frustration and disappointment.

There are some things I have natural talent for but no passion. I don't spend much effort doing things that do not interest me.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#31
Ditto.

Can you get pretty good, maybe even very good, at something which you don't have much natural ability at (whatever that means- i'm well aware some "natural ability" things are actually nurture instead), and which you aren't much interested in? With enough effort, probably.

What's the point, though?
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#32
Quote by Dave_Mc
(a) yeah absolutely, I think it mentions where you can get the original paper but if it's like most academic stuff you have to pay a pretty steep price

I also thought that it was interesting that they said that when they actually checked how much practise people were doing, there was even less of a correlation. I certainly wouldn't suggest that the "work hard like me or you're lazy" brigade is full of it, but a less charitable person might.

I think it depends on what your initial prejudice is, really- the work hard brigade overstates how much work they're doing and ignores or minimises how much talent they had initially, while the talent brigade tends to do the opposite. Be very suspicious and skeptical when listening to what people say, in other words.

(b) yeah definitely. it's very interesting- some people are adamant that you should practise your weaknesses to get better, while others swear by ignoring them and practising what you're good at to get really good at it.

I sort of sit on the fence, as usual. I think it depends on what you're bad at (if it's "chords", then you kind of need to practise that, if it's one very specific sub-genre of music which isn't that popular you probably can ignore it), and what your aims are (if you want to get famous you're probably more likely to get famous if you are really good at one thing, whereas if you want to be in a cover band being decent at a wide range of stuff is likely more important).


yeah i'd never say don't practice your weaknesses or ignore them. i've pretty much found that it's better not to obsess on them either. i tend to slowly work on things and then incorporate them into my playing over time rather than force it or shoehorn them in. in the end they sound more natural and i have time to make them part of my playing.
#34
Does God have limits? No. Same with talent.

Inside each and every person lies the same ability. No exceptions. The trick is to find the individual key that unlocks it for you. The world is divided into those who have found the key, those who are looking for it, and those that find it for a while but keep dropping it. No one is really superior or inferior and the playing field is for the most part level. I really think so.

When you find the key, you realize you can't really even take much credit for what flows out of you. You're just the conduit. It's something other. When it happens you can only sit back and admire it with awe. It's that shared authenticity we all can recognize in each other. When you recognize the authentic in some great player and buy all their stuff, you're just recognizing the same stuff that's in you.
#36
Quote by monwobobbo
yeah i'd never say don't practice your weaknesses or ignore them. i've pretty much found that it's better not to obsess on them either. i tend to slowly work on things and then incorporate them into my playing over time rather than force it or shoehorn them in. in the end they sound more natural and i have time to make them part of my playing.


yeah

Quote by edg

Inside each and every person lies the same ability. No exceptions.


Do you have a citation for that?
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#38
Quote by edg
Does God have limits? No. Same with talent.

Inside each and every person lies the same ability. No exceptions. The trick is to find the individual key that unlocks it for you. The world is divided into those who have found the key, those who are looking for it, and those that find it for a while but keep dropping it. No one is really superior or inferior and the playing field is for the most part level. I really think so.

When you find the key, you realize you can't really even take much credit for what flows out of you. You're just the conduit. It's something other. When it happens you can only sit back and admire it with awe. It's that shared authenticity we all can recognize in each other. When you recognize the authentic in some great player and buy all their stuff, you're just recognizing the same stuff that's in you.


yeah i don't know about this. this is the kind of stuff they tell kids in school these days "everyone is a winner" and in real life it's just not true. sorry but i can't buy the everyone has the same abilities thing at all. we are individuals and while perhaps evryone has some kind of gift (whether they realize it or not) may have some validity clearly not everyone can excell at anything. the field is never level in anything in life.

i definitely take credit for what i create musically. while "god" may have given me the ability, i choose to use it and in what direction it goes.

by the way you have a really nice guitar collection and i enjoyed your playing in the vids.
#39
Lots of these great players started when they where like 9 years old it's much easy is for kids to learn then grown ups but if u keep particie u will be good
#40
Quote by monwobobbo
yeah i don't know about this. this is the kind of stuff they tell kids in school these days "everyone is a winner" and in real life it's just not true. sorry but i can't buy the everyone has the same abilities thing at all. we are individuals and while perhaps evryone has some kind of gift (whether they realize it or not) may have some validity clearly not everyone can excell at anything. the field is never level in anything in life.

i definitely take credit for what i create musically. while "god" may have given me the ability, i choose to use it and in what direction it goes.

by the way you have a really nice guitar collection and i enjoyed your playing in the vids.


I agree that not everyone is endowed with the same gifts or that there are very real physical or even mental differences. What I'm trying to say is that this thing being labeled as "talent" here is somewhat of a mirage and isn't something quantifiable. It's a lot more about finding something in yourself and being authentic to that and not a fake or a phony.

Take a great Blues player and a great Jazz player. Now, Blues is basically getting good at 1 "song" and Jazz is a wide variety of songs a lot of which are much more complex than Blues. The Jazz player is much more likely to be great at Blues than vice-versa. So while their ranges may differ, that which makes each of them great in their own way and recognized as such, is the same. Many, many players have learned a lot of skill, but cannot consistently tap into that which takes them from merely skilled to awesome. Also, many, many, many awesome players never even get the recognition because that's more of a crapshoot depending on who is paying attention at what times.

Some people find their keys very quickly and are called prodigy. Some people take much longer, but ultimately reach the same place. Some (most perhaps) never find the key and give up trying saying "I have no talent". To the latter I'd say, if that's your reason for giving up, keep trying because that's a lie you're buying into.
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