#1
Very simple question really. I've been composing a bit lately and have just started on a brand new chord progression. The intro to the song is as follows:

Capo - First Fret

A, E, A, A in 3rd position, E

It gets more complicated in the verse but for the purpose of the question only these three chords are needed. Anyway, in music theory, is there a technical name for chords played further up the neck or would the chord in bold just be referred to as an A chord?

Thanks!
#2
If it's still A C# and E, then it's still an A chord.

Now maybe the C# or E are in the bass, which you could indicate like (A/C# or A/E) maybe the A is the lowest note. But it's all still A if those are the notes in question, no new name.
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#3
It's a barre chord. I assume when you say playing at the 3rd position you mean that you're holding your index finger down across all of the strings, right?
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#4
Quote by Jet Penguin
If it's still A C# and E, then it's still an A chord.

Now maybe the C# or E are in the bass, which you could indicate like (A/C# or A/E) maybe the A is the lowest note. But it's all still A if those are the notes in question, no new name.


So if I were writing down the chord progression, would I just literally write it it as "A in 3rd pos."? Like, the shape is the same just moved up two frets.

Also, the verse includes a G chord but without the high E string being played. So it's just 32000x. Is that still referred to as G or does it have another name?

Quote by theogonia777
It's a barre chord. I assume when you say playing at the 3rd position you mean that you're holding your index finger down across all of the strings, right?


No, I'm violinist so my definition of third position my be based on that and not guitar. By 3rd position I mean that I retain the shape of the A chord but move it up two frets. Like how on a violin 3rd position means moving up two tones i.e. placing the first finger where the third was.
Last edited by Serotonite at Aug 19, 2015,
#5
If you keep the shape of an A chord but move it up two frets, it's no longer an A chord but rather a B.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#6
Dude, two tones and two frets are different; you want to be more precise with your terminology.

Chords are determined by the notes that are in them, not the chord shape and position.
#7
Yeah, you don't even have to write anything. It's just A, and then I can play all the A's I want wherever I want them
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#8
Quote by NeoMvsEu
Dude, two tones and two frets are different; you want to be more precise with your terminology.

Chords are determined by the notes that are in them, not the chord shape and position.


I didn't say twp tones were two frets. On a violin, 3rd position = 2 tones up. Idk what it is on the guitar but I assumed to frets up is either 3rd position. with one fret being 2nd position. Though it might be half position idk. I don't even know if position changing is a thing on a guitar tbh.

I was asking if I move an A chord up two frets is it still and A chord or is it B or whatever?
#9
On guitar, positions are what fret your index finger is on. To be in the fifth position means to have my index finger resting over the fifth fret. The sixth fret would be played by the middle finger, seventh by the ring and eighth by the ring (which can also do the ninth fret if needed).

If I were to play an A chord in fifth position, it would be at the fifth fret ( 577655 ). To play it in open position I would play the basic A chord ( x02220 ).

So, you're barring that bold chord (as I understand it) two frets up from A ( x02220 )? That's a B chord ( x24442 ).
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Last edited by rockingamer2 at Aug 20, 2015,
#10
Quote by rockingamer2
So, you're barring that bold chord (as I understand it) two frets up from A? That's a B chord.


I'm not barring it no, but yeah, I'm sliding it up two frets. Is that still B?
#11
Quote by Serotonite
I'm not barring it no, but yeah, I'm sliding it up two frets. Is that still B?

I'm assuming you've been ignoring the capo on the first fret and pretending it's the nut (because it's easier), so all of this is actually one fret up from what we're writing.

So you're going from A ( x02220 ) to ( x04440 )? That's A, F#, B, D#, E. That could be a B7add11/A, but I don't know enough to give a definitive answer.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


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#12
Okay thanks. Yeah I've been ignoring the capo cause otherwise I would get even more confused
#13
It would be easier if you had tabbed the chords you use.

Just tab the whole progression, and also what's happening in the other sections of the song.

It would be even better if you recorded it and let us hear how it sounds.
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#14
Quote by Serotonite
I didn't say [two] tones were two frets. On a violin, 3rd position = 2 tones up.

A to C, E to G, B to D, F# to A are not 2 tones, they are 1.5.

This is why I told you to be careful with your wording.

+1 to MM; write out the chords using something like tab or equivalent. Even writing x02220 for A is more helpful.