#1
Wiring my Tom Anderson H2+ to one volume pot, but it's not working. I hooked the guitar to the amp, but the volume of the amp way up (also the gain, to be sure), but with both the pot completely open as well as completely closed I get magnetism I never hear the poof sound when I put a metal object to it. What did I do wrong?

Fancy paint illustration:


The instruction I got from Tom himself:

looking at the pot with the three terminals facing you, solder the red pickup wire to the left terminal.

solder green and white together then wrap them with tape or heat shrink tubing so that they do not touch anything else.

solder black and bare wire to back of the pot.

solder hot from the jack tip to center pot terminal.

solder ground from jack to the right pot terminal, and also to back of pot. you may be able to bend that pot terminal over and solder it to the pot casing.
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#2
solder green and white together and put some electric tape or heat shrink over the two exposed wire ends. if they touch anything inside the control cavity there will be no signal is the first thing i'd do.

is there a ground wire going to your input jacks sleeve? that can be another problem too why you're not getting any signal. We have to walk into a place to walk out in regards to electricity.

anyways reassurance
red is where it should be
black and bare are in the right places
the pots grounded properly

it may be a small problem honestly, when in doubt two helpful links, the best wiring diagrams for beginners to intermediate as well as a pickup color code directory
http://www.guitarelectronics.com/category/wiring_resources_guitar_wiring_diagrams.humbucker_wiring_color_codes/
http://www.seymourduncan.com/support/wiring-diagrams/

good luck
Last edited by Tallwood13 at Aug 20, 2015,
#3
Soldered white and green together and put a sleeve over it, it's not touching anything else. There is a ground wire from the jack, it's the white cable.

EDIT: The only thing I can think of is switching the jack wires, might have switched those when soldering the jack. Don't want to unscrew the jack plate, happy it's sort of straight screwed on the guitar
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Last edited by icanhasgodmode at Aug 20, 2015,
#4
with switching the leads on the input jack pretty much if they are in the wrong places the guitar will buzz as it will be a grounding issue.

cold solders may be an issue or is the pots contacts touching the inside cavity of the guitar? my friends les paul custom did recently and i didnt even have to whip out the soldering iron haha.
#5
What do you mean with cold solder?
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#6
a dull and not shiny solder joint is a cold solder joint. To prevent it keep the iron tip as clean as possible. Some tips are:

Tin the iron before every application. To tin it of course we're applying more solder. this is also a good indication to know when you're ready to solder with cheaper irons that don't tell you their temperature.

run the irons tip across a wet sponge when there is too much solder or some dirt on the iron from say touching a wire by accident. Especially if there is rosin (orangish stuff) on the tip i get rid of it as soon as possible if it's visible. The sponge shouldn't be dripping wet , just damp. It won't electrocute you or anything don't worry.

when you're done tin the iron one more time and then drag the iron across the wet sponge.

if there is hardened on stuff use copper steel wool (dollar store) to get the stuff off. Doing all of the above you'll have better solder joints and a longer soldering iron tip life. By the way if the irons tip is designed for lead solder stick to it. Lead free instead of lead for example will ruin the iron fast.

but yeah if it's a one volume no tone wiring just for reassurance.
Last edited by Tallwood13 at Aug 21, 2015,
#7
I think this is the problem, because I borrowed the soldering iron, was never used before, but feels cheap. And the solder provided with it didn't stick to the tip (?). So basically I have to somehow remove all the solder and resolder?
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#8
on newer volume/tone pots some have a coating on them , sand it off with like 80 grit sand paper until there is lines in it. You only need about the size of a guitar pick worth of sand paper to do so.

but with the irons tip there is a few ways for a bit of the solder to stick onto the tip. This way works well. Besides tinning the soldering iron tip you want to tin every wire and contact for the best possible results. Tinning a wire you just apply a bit at the end and you're good to go, the tip this guys very helpful.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j1ZnkTC5bps

cheap soldering irons work fine, try sanding the back of the pot and see if the solder sticks without any extra effort. But yeah clean the irons tip and since it's a one time only thing you're installing pickups worst case scenario it's the solder.

to remove solder though if you really want to solder wick is excellent. The idea is when the iron is hot enough to melt solder put the wick over the bead of solder that you want to get rid of and it absorbs it like a sponge. But lets see how necessary this is to remove old solder though I've worked on a lot of guitars and maybe removed solder from the back of a pot once.


trying to think if there is any ways to test the volume potentiometer without using a muiltimeter though because sometimes when you get the pot too hot it "dies" , i've only had this problem twice ever of say 100 - 200 pots i've worked on.

if you have a multimeter i'll show you how to test a pot
Last edited by Tallwood13 at Aug 21, 2015,
#9
I found the problem, one of the hot connections touched the shielding...

All is well now, have to order lighter string gauge, because tuners are not happy with the one (0.054) I bought.

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