#1
I want to get back into playing guitar, I used to play both electric and acoustic guitar many years ago but stopped due to personal reasons. The music I play is heavy metal and hard rock. From my research I will need a steel string acoustic guitar to play this type of music.

Could you please help me decide which acoustic guitar is best for me? I don't much about acoustics but more about electric.

I have done some brief research and have come up with a list of 3 acoustics I am interested in or sound like some thing that would be good for me:

Epiphone AJ220s
Washburn WD10s
Yamaha FG700s

If you guys have any other better recommendations please let me know.

Also I notice a lot of acoustic guitars these days are also electrical/able to be plugged into an amp. Is this really an important feature to look for? I doubt I will ever play acoustic live so maybe I should focus my money on a pure acoustic guitar with no amp ability?
#2
If you want to play metal on an acoustic the action needs to be very low. Of those three I would recommend the Yamaha - but make sure it has good action and intonation.

Washburns are generally terrible, but there are exceptions. Yamaha has the best quality control under $500 and it's not even close. Most other companies litter music stores with terrible guitars that can't stay in tune or play in tune.
#3
For playing heavy metal and hard rock I would recommend one of these acoustic guitars:




PS. Just make sure it's made from all-solid wood not laminate.
#4
take a look at ovation. their necks are about as close to an electric as there is.

if you have to, the yamaha is the better of those three but why not an actual electric guitar?
Last edited by ad_works at Aug 21, 2015,
#5
Hi guys,

Sorry if I didn't make myself clear. I will be playing acoustic songs that heavy metal and hard rock bands play on acoustic, not play electric guitar music on an acoustic guitar.
Hope that clears things up a bit.

I don't want to spend more then $500 on an acoustic guitar, so maybe the Yamaha would be the best way to go.

Could you give me any other suggestions or should I just stick with the Yamaha? I will probably play 80% of my music on eclectic and the rest on acoustic. But who knows I many decide to get more into acoustic guitar later on
#6
I will be buying the acoustic from this shop, so if you guys could recommend something from this catalogue it will make my choice easier:

http://www.allansbillyhyde.com.au/

I don't mind spend $550 and that's my budget, but like I said I wont play acoustic too much so if I could get something around the $300 mark that would be great
#7
Quote by Want2Shred
I will be buying the acoustic from this shop, so if you guys could recommend something from this catalogue it will make my choice easier:

http://www.allansbillyhyde.com.au/

I don't mind spend $550 and that's my budget, but like I said I wont play acoustic too much so if I could get something around the $300 mark that would be great


My goodness what a limited selection, and the prices seem so high! On the other hand the USA dollar is dominating the Aussie dollar (.72 exchange rate). That plus shipping I guess explains the prices.
Out of that selection, for your price range, I've heard the below guitar is pretty nice.

http://www.allansbillyhyde.com.au/prod/EAE5VSNH3/Epiphone%C2%AE_Ltd._Ed._1963_EJ-45_Acoustic_Guitar_%28Vintage_Sunburst%29.aspx
#8
Quote by Want2Shred
Hi guys,

Sorry if I didn't make myself clear. I will be playing acoustic songs that heavy metal and hard rock bands play on acoustic, not play electric guitar music on an acoustic guitar.
Hope that clears things up a bit.
Well, you made yourself clear to me, and "I have some bad news for you sunshine", (to quote Pink Floyd), there really isn't such. an animal. Any acoustic that you see your favorite metal playing, is shoved through the board and optimized with EQ, reverb, and possibly other effects.

Dean makes acoustics that are "stylistically" suitable, as does Ibanez. They're not terribly good when they're unplugged, but they're not supposed to be, for a number of reasons, with looks being a primary consideration and that forces some sonic compromise.

Rock acts have been using acoustics for decades, I believe for two primary reasons. One, because an acoustic is so much harmonically richer than an (unplugged) electric. (With an electric, most of the harmonics are coming from the amp's harmonic distortion characteristics). And two, the gentle folkie sound of the acoustic, provides spectacular contrast for the bombast which will surely follow.

Ian Anderson , (from "Jethro Tull") takes this concept almost to the absurd, by playing a tiny A/E stage guitar, which isn't much bigger than a baritone uke, So you get, "tinkle, strum, tinkle, then BA-BOOM!!!!, when the rest of the band kicks in.

Quote by Want2Shred
I don't want to spend more then $500 on an acoustic guitar, so maybe the Yamaha would be the best way to go.
Well, if you ask 100 FG-700 owners are they happy with their guitar, 99+ will say "ecstatic". So you can't go wrong there. You are absolutely going to want to grab the electric model, the FGX-700. Over here in the colonies north, the FG-700 runs $200.00 USD, while the FGX-700 comes in at $300.00. Given your playing experience and intent, IMHO, that would be the way to go.

Taylor guitars have what they like to call; a "modern sound", which isn't laid back like Martin and its clones, but rather brittle and forward. A Taylor might be a good choice for your next acoustic, but your budget isn't going to float one this time around.

I second the Ovation suggestion. As long as you know how to correctly evaluate a used guitar, you might get good bang for your buck there. Again, don't buy one without electronics. Ovations aren't particularly good at holding their value, so there are bargains to be had in the used US made models. Play before you buy one though. They have a distinct sound, which isn't for everybody. And they like to be plugged in.

Quote by Want2Shred
Could you give me any other suggestions or should I just stick with the Yamaha? I will probably play 80% of my music on eclectic and the rest on acoustic. But who knows I many decide to get more into acoustic guitar later on
My only other suggestion would be the Epiphone EJ-200-SCE. At one time or another, a lot of high profile artists have, and still play, its Gibson progenitor, the SJ-200, notably Pete Townshend. It's a huge guitar, and you won't get away stringing it with extra lights. The size of the sound board and the bracing pattern, requires a lot of input to get it going, but you can bang away on rhythm, to your heart's content.

I don't even know if you could buy an acoustic Seagull S-6 on your budget in your location..

One of the guys here, duncanjames10 just bought a Sigma. They're sort of "Martinesque" sounding, warm and laid back. If that's a sound which appeals to you, you should audition one of those.

Then there's Takamine. Most of those are good plug-me-ins. Garth Brooks uses one in lieu of the traditionally country Gibson Hummingbird or Dove. Either of which would be more or less direct exchanges for Garth's dreadnought Tak.

Here's a link to the Yamaha A/E FGX-700 I spoke about: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/yamaha-fgx700sc-solid-top-cutaway-acoustic-electric-guitar/h74858000002000

And here's the Epiphone EJ-200-SCE: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/guitars/epiphone-ej-200sce-acoustic-electric-guitar?rNtt=EJ-200-SCE&index=1

Keep in mind you would almost have to buy the electric version of the Epiphone. It has a solid top, whereas its acoustic sister, the EJ-200 "Artist" is all laminate. If it came down to that, the Yamaha plain FG-700 would more than likely be the better choice.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 24, 2015,
#9
I'm wondering if the OP has access to Amazon. Amazon has fantastic returns policy so there really isn't risk to buying from them....if you get a bad guitar, send it back

Seagull Entourage is cheaper and BETTER than the S6. Comes in at aroud $500 au, I think.
#10
Quote by TobusRex
I'm wondering if the OP has access to Amazon. Amazon has fantastic returns policy so there really isn't risk to buying from them....if you get a bad guitar, send it back

Seagull Entourage is cheaper and BETTER than the S6. Comes in at aroud $500 au, I think.
Actually they had a one day blowout of the Excursion mini jumbo last week: http://www.acousticguitarforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=397673 At least in the US. I saw the big "E" git all exited, and mistakenly though it was the Entourage. That's all I got here, I guess I'm off topic......., (again)....

I do think our TS is a prime candidate for an A/E guitar (*). Which would place the Seagull S-6 W/ Q1 electronics over budget. I'm not familiar with the Entourage.

(*) I say "A/E" but I think the US is the only place in the world that calls them, "acoustic electric". I know all of Europe calls them electro-acoustic or something like that. I know the 'lectricity' word comes first.

As for Amazon, wait a few years, they'll be able to fly the guitar to Australia with their goofy drones. I imagine they'd have to stop at Wake or Midway Island(s), for a recharge though...
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 24, 2015,
#11
Heavy Metal/ Hard Rock or anything close to that style of music - Overdrive or/and Distortion with a electric guitar.

Acoustic will sound like an acoustic. However, you could get an electric acoustic and get effects for it but why would you if you are chugging the low E string? Just saying.

This coming from an acoustic lover that as a teenager I used to play metal music. It falls into the category of using the right tool for the job. You don't grab a hammer to screw in a screw do you?

Then saw your post after.

Well here is an update. Just because a rocker plays a song on an acoustic doesn't make the song a heavy metal/hard rock song just a song being played by a metal head or/and rocker. With that said it's not so much as what is the best guitar for that kind of music, but what is the best guitar that has the sound you are looking for. Commonly if you watch music videos you will see guys that have Gibson acoustics: Slash, Poison, Tesla especially on 5 man acoustic jam album. Still doesn't mean that is the best choice. Focus more on the style of playing not the genre.

BTW a good Gibson is not cheap.
***************Sig***************
Taylor 314 & GS Mini & Martin LX1
Last edited by fingerguy at Sep 1, 2015,
#12
I arrange and play covers of various metal/metallish bands (Tool, Alice in Chains, Nine Inch Nails, System of a Down, Soundgarden, Megadeth) on a steel string acoustic (without distortion) and my response is that it depends on what you want to do. It's going to be harder to play fast, heavy stuff on an acoustic, though some feel more like an electric than others. Personally, I mostly play rhythm while on acoustic (sometimes I sing variants of the lead guitar) and while low action is easy to play, I tend to hammer the hell out of my guitar and a medium/highish action works well for this in my experience (a more sensitive guitar or one that is plugged in with fairly high-gain electronics may not require this but I like the feel and sound of playing pretty hard when covering heavy sounds). I have an Alvarez RD20U, it's an all laminate dreadnought cosmetic second, and I put a K&K Western Mini in it. Sounds and plays good by my ears. Ideally, I'd probably get a 12-fret cutaway but this is a 14 and not and I've been playing it for years, often preferring it over fancier models I've had.
--
vast. chains. to hold. us down.
#13
@CaptainCranky: Sorry I didn't make myself clear. I was referring to the Seagull Entourage Rustic dreadnaught, not the travel guitar. On the other hand another player was in the room and he was raving about the mini-jumbo entourage, so I'm sure it's very good.