#1
A recent discussion of restringing brought back a question that has bothered me for some time. Why do some guitarists coil up the excess wire at the tuning peg, rather than cutting it off?

I was once offered an explanation about repairing a broken string on the fly, but that didn't make much sense.
Dave Bowers

Instruments
Martin D-28
Martin/Sigma DR12-7
Martin Dreadnought Junior
Washburn EA25SNB
Epiphone F-112 Bard
Epiphone Les Paul Special II
#2
I think people do this just because they think it looks cool, just as years ago they'd stick their cigarette on the end of an uncut string.
There's no physical reason I can think of.

Back when I started playing in the 70s, a guy I knew said that cutting the string "sent a vibration through it" that would shorten the life....
I refrained from pointing out that the whole reason strings exist is to vibrate....
#3
it looks badass

Quote by slapsymcdougal
You can tell if it's eager, because you put your hand down her pants and it feels like a horse eating oats.

Nicest compliment on my looks:
Quote by slapsymcdougal
Putting the 'sex' in 'convicted sex offender'.
#5
Quote by icanhasgodmode
it looks badass

Uhhh, it looks pretty terrible. It's about the same type of "badass" as scratching a guitar's finish with a key.

I absolutely have no idea why people do that, and it's pretty much dangerous. Wouldn't want to experience being hit in the eye by that (and it's totally possible), and I think everyone who has ever restrung a guitar will agree that the seemingly innocent thin unwound ****ers are the worst.
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
There's no point in trying to convince a moron.
#7
This is a trick question....., right?

I thought people stopped doing this after drip candles went out of style.

Plus, given the era, "catching the waves", (or cosmic rays), could only be done by leaving the strings uncut and coiled, (coiled = very important), on a Martin dreadnought.

That skinny a** electric junk wouldn't catch a moonbeam if you pulled down your pants and sat on it.
#10
Quote by Tony Done
^^^^^ Nah, he only sounds good because he's playing a Maton.

I saw that episode, pretty good. I like the show more than other popular talent show, as it showcases many other kins of acts in addition to singing.


He is quite good. I don't care for fake "southern" accents (I grew up in Texas and Oklahoma and never heard anybody like that), but the guy is a helluva singer/player!

This is a great time to be inspired if one plays an instrument. So many talented amateurs on youtube to watch. Check the video below out....badass! On 3 strings!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iIIEhH7xOXg
#11
Quote by davebowers
A recent discussion of restringing brought back a question that has bothered me for some time. Why do some guitarists coil up the excess wire at the tuning peg, rather than cutting it off?

I was once offered an explanation about repairing a broken string on the fly, but that didn't make much sense.


Because they're lazy and disorganized.
#12
Thanks. You've pretty much confirmed my thoughts on the matter. I'll continue to cut them off.
Dave Bowers

Instruments
Martin D-28
Martin/Sigma DR12-7
Martin Dreadnought Junior
Washburn EA25SNB
Epiphone F-112 Bard
Epiphone Les Paul Special II
#13
The main reason for coiling is safety, no "needles" sticking out to get stuck by.
Another reason is some folks think it looks cool, the jury's still out on that one.
Just a matter of preference.
#15
Personally I don't cut the excess string off many times when my strings broke I could use the extra line for a quick fix before I could replace them at the shop.
#16
Quote by xXPROCUTTERXx
Personally I don't cut the excess string off many times when my strings broke I could use the extra line for a quick fix before I could replace them at the shop.
I have not a clue what you're talking about. Strings break between the tuning pegs and the bridge, so I'm having a bit of trouble understanding what you mean. I don't understand how the extra wire outside of the tuning pegs helps. If you would be so kind as to explain....
#17
Quote by Captaincranky
I have not a clue what you're talking about. Strings break between the tuning pegs and the bridge, so I'm having a bit of trouble understanding what you mean. I don't understand how the extra wire outside of the tuning pegs helps. If you would be so kind as to explain....


My experience is that they mostly break at the tuner post or thereabouts. I keep some pieces of trimmed strings, or old strings to repair them (it really is the only way to get authentic blues tone anyway), but leaving long ends for such repairs is a good idea if you don't mind the look. I always use a heavier gauge for the extension piece, joining them with a sheet bend. Of course it does nothing good for the tone if the break is between the nut and the bridge. HTH
#18
Cool! I'm not quite sure what a "sheet bend" is, but I mostly catch the drift.

I guess those old blues guys didn't really have the money to pop down to the music store when their strings lost some of the new sparkle. So a little collateral mechanical "improvisation" was called for along with the musical improvisation.

I expect, "Elixir vs. D'Addario" wasn't a hot topic of conversation either...

Now I've got that damned Elton John song, "I guess that's why they call it the blues", stuck in my head.

BTW, did you check out the video of John Denver doing "The Bells of Rhymney", in "Best 12 String Songs" I posted the other day: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=702670 (Although I'm guessing you've already seen it)
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 7, 2015,
#19

Don Ross doesn't cut of his strings, instead he loops them around like in this image. Apparently it's because he uses so many tunings within a set, that this way he won't be able to accidentally prick his finger on end of a string (that shit hurts) when he goes up to tune. Haven't tried this myself but I can see how it can be useful for someone in his position.
#20
^^^Exactly, and the same is still true in developing countries. There are charities that collect and export used strings. However, by the time I change mine they are beyond hope.

Here's a sheet bend, the "U" is made from the thicker string:




They very rarely slip, I've only had that happen a couple of times, even with plain strings.
#21
Quote by Jimjambanx
Don Ross doesn't cut of his strings, instead he loops them around like in this image. Apparently it's because he uses so many tunings within a set, that this way he won't be able to accidentally prick his finger on end of a string (that shit hurts) when he goes up to tune. Haven't tried this myself but I can see how it can be useful for someone in his position.
I expect you're probably way too young to have been there, but the whole loopy string endie thing, was a hippie / folkie ritual during the 60's & 70's. You got your D-28 and you never, ever cut the strings. Then, you kicked back, lit up the drip candle, fired up a doobie, and proceeded to launch into either, "Blowing in the Wind", or, "The Times They are a ChanginG". "Puff the Magic Dragon" worked well also, considering the multiple interpretations possible of the lyrics.

During the Vietnam war, "Puff the Magic Dragon" became the nickname for a C-130 with a "mini-gun" hanging out the cargo door. (The gun would spit out about 2000 (!) rounds a minute). Just the thing for spraying the "Ho Chi Mihn Trail"on a not so quiet summer evening.

Meanwhile, back in the states, everybody was protesting this sort of behavior, on their Martin D-28's, with looped string ends. These were all the country's "individualists", each with exactly the same guitar, and the same string treatments.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 7, 2015,
#22
Maybe that's how I "missed" the 60's. I was there, but I played an Epiphone F-112, always cut off my string ends and didn't own a drip candle.
Dave Bowers

Instruments
Martin D-28
Martin/Sigma DR12-7
Martin Dreadnought Junior
Washburn EA25SNB
Epiphone F-112 Bard
Epiphone Les Paul Special II
#23
Quote by davebowers
Maybe that's how I "missed" the 60's. I was there, but I played an Epiphone F-112, always cut off my string ends and didn't own a drip candle.
If your cultural stoicism included never having a pair of heavily patched blue jeans, then you did indeed, miss a valuable part of the 60's experience..
#25
Quote by Tony Done
^^^^ I was more the tweed jacket and tie type, but I did have a pair of patched jeans, acquired indirectly from my first wife's previous boy-friend. I never did get one of those denim caps like Dylan wore, though I looked hard enough for one.
So those hats never made it to Oz? I though they were "railroad hats", the kind train engineers wore, back in the old steam locomotive days.

This, but in denim:


I know about those acquisitions from former significant others. Many of my succeeding girl friends, acquired some of their lingerie in the same way. (Strictly for photographic purposes though).

OK, I make no excuses for it, I'm a cad, and proud of it...
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 7, 2015,
#27
I always cut off the strings. To me it's either laziness or they think it looks cool. To me, it's something that can poke you in the eye.
***************Sig***************
Taylor 314 & GS Mini & Martin LX1
#28
I always cut. Looks sloppy otherwise. Some people like that look apparently. Probably the same guys that let their bags sag.
#29
Quote by TobusRex
I always cut. Looks sloppy otherwise. Some people like that look apparently. Probably the same guys that let their bags sag.


And pants
***************Sig***************
Taylor 314 & GS Mini & Martin LX1
#31
Quote by Captaincranky
If your cultural stoicism included never having a pair of heavily patched blue jeans, then you did indeed, miss a valuable part of the 60's experience..


For some reason I kind of specialized in greasy-looking corduroys and grubby sweaters topped off with a tweed jacket I'd had since high school. Jeans and fatigues just didn't cut it.

If it matters, my roommate had a lava lamp.
Dave Bowers

Instruments
Martin D-28
Martin/Sigma DR12-7
Martin Dreadnought Junior
Washburn EA25SNB
Epiphone F-112 Bard
Epiphone Les Paul Special II