#1
Sure, I like to play metal. I also like to play a lot of other kinds of music and have guitars for these various styles that I attempt to play. The compound radius neck seems to be mainly used on shredder type guitars, which is fine but we must ask ourselves, what does the compound radius neck do, why compound radius.? Without going into great detail it simply makes for less fret noise as you probably know. That my friends is a darn good idea. I think it's one of the greatest inventions for the electric guitar of the 20th century. Maybe not quite as important as the truss rod but certainly a compound radius neck is an improvement.
So my question is why don't we see compound radius necks on all guitars, jazz boxes, acoustic guitars, classical guitars and of course all electric guitars and basses.
Is there a stigma against it. Or is there a valid reason? That is my question.
#2
1. Wrong forum. Take it to EG.
2. Feel. I'm not fond of how it feels and I'm certain I'm not the only one. Doesn't feel right.
3. If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Les Pauls, stratocasters, RGs, plenty of amazing guitars that have sold millions of units over the decades and been a part of records that have sold similarly have had non compound radius fretboards. You don't mess with success, especially with how slow a lot of musicians are to adapt to changes in their tools.
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#4
Quote by necrosis1193
1. Wrong forum. Take it to EG.
2. Feel. I'm not fond of how it feels and I'm certain I'm not the only one. Doesn't feel right.
3. If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Les Pauls, stratocasters, RGs, plenty of amazing guitars that have sold millions of units over the decades and been a part of records that have sold similarly have had non compound radius fretboards. You don't mess with success, especially with how slow a lot of musicians are to adapt to changes in their tools.


I always had an issue with that saying. If it aint broken, it doesnt mean that it doesnt need improvement.
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
#5
This isn't the appropriate subforum.

The reason why is mainly because of tradition, and in a small part, cost. Guitars don't traditionally have compound radius fretboards. You don't see them on classicals because the fretboards on classicals are always dead flat. The vast, vast majority of acoustic guitar players are not lead players that play above the 12th fret and therefore don't reap any benefit in having them.

Compound radius fretboards are not necessarily an improvement. It's just going to create a difference in feel between one end of the fretboard and the other. I personally love them though.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Aug 22, 2015,
#6
Quote by Guitar0player at #33562097
I always had an issue with that saying. If it aint broken, it doesnt mean that it doesnt need improvement.


Oh, you can tinker with things to be sure. Fender does it all the time, but they start out by doing special limited runs and FSR runs of things they're experimenting with to see if people like them. Road Worn started out as special run deluxe MIM relics, and people liked them, so they made a full series of them. HH strats started as limited run variants, and after a lot of success, things like the Blacktop strats became full-fledged models. They also tried swirl guitars, which I love, but which didn't sell, so they abandoned them. And Floyd Rose strats, which also didn't really sell much, so were discontinued too. They experiment with special runs, and keep what works, but they're never going to abandon the standard lines that make their money.

You can thinker, and you can try to improve your design. But if you have a successful product, you don't take it off the market just because you think you've developed something better. You put it next to it and let people buy both of them. Just because you built what you think is a better mousetrap doesn't mean that the customer will agree. If you have something that works, you keep it.
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Last edited by necrosis1193 at Aug 22, 2015,
#7
Quote by necrosis1193
Oh, you can tinker with things to be sure. Fender does it all the time, but they start out by doing special limited runs and FSR runs of things they're experimenting with to see if people like them. Road Worn started out as special run deluxe MIM relics, and people liked them, so they made a full series of them. HH strats started as limited run variants, and after a lot of success, things like the Blacktop strats became full-fledged models. They also tried swirl guitars, which I love, but which didn't sell, so they abandoned them. And Floyd Rose strats, which also didn't really sell much, so were discontinued too. They experiment with special runs, and keep what works, but they're never going to abandon the standard lines that make their money.

You can thinker, and you can try to improve your design. But if you have a successful product, you don't take it off the market just because you think you've developed something better. You put it next to it and let people buy both of them. Just because you built what you think is a better mousetrap doesn't mean that the customer will agree. If you have something that works, you keep it.


While what you say is indeed true, marketing wise. I was talking about the ignorance of the people who usually use that line.

Like: "carbureted V8's are the way to go cos if it aint broken, dont fix it". FFS there is a reason car companies dont do it nowadays.
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
#8
Because some people prefer necks without them.

Seriously, this is like "why do they make cars with straight lines instead of curves"?
#9
Quote by slapsymcdougal
Because some people prefer necks without them.

Seriously, this is like "why do they make cars with straight lines instead of curves"?


Decreasing aerodynamic capabilities = Increase in fuel consumption = More money for Saudi Arabia.
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#10
Quote by yope
Without going into great detail it simply makes for less fret noise as you probably know. That my friends is a darn good idea. I think it's one of the greatest inventions for the electric guitar of the 20th century.


You've got to be kidding me. Fret noise is a legitimate problem? Yeah, okay? One of the greatest inventions for the electric guitar of the 20th century? What about:

-pickups
-solid bodies
-tone/volume pots
-amplifiers
-distortion pedals
-tremolo bridges
-adjustable saddles
-reverb units
-delay pedals
-humbuckers

You know, things that can actually be a major benefit?
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#11
Quote by theogonia777
You've got to be kidding me. Fret noise is a legitimate problem? Yeah, okay? One of the greatest inventions for the electric guitar of the 20th century? What about:

-pickups
-solid bodies
-tone/volume pots
-amplifiers
-distortion pedals
-tremolo bridges
-adjustable saddles
-reverb units
-delay pedals
-humbuckers

You know, things that can actually be a major benefit?

a.k.a. the electric guitar itself
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#12
Compound radii are harder to make and most people don't care enough to consider it a substantial improvement. On Jackson and Charvel guitars, the radius goes from 12 to 16 inches, so it's pretty flat all across the board. Maybe some people prefer a rounder fretboard.
#13
Quote by sashki
12 to 16 inches

I hear the guitarist from Insane Funeral prefers to quadruple in radius.
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#15
Quote by Guitar0player
Decreasing aerodynamic capabilities = Increase in fuel consumption = More money for Saudi Arabia.

TBH, most people are sufficiently bad drivers that next to over-revving, accelerating and braking too hard etc, the aerodynamic properties of the car are pretty far down the list on reasons why their MPG doesn't match up with what they expected.
#16
Quote by sashki
Is that one of those newfangled may-mays I'm not aware of?


Less may-may, more Cray-Cray.
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#17
Quote by slapsymcdougal
TBH, most people are sufficiently bad drivers that next to over-revving, accelerating and braking too hard etc, the aerodynamic properties of the car are pretty far down the list on reasons why their MPG doesn't match up with what they expected.


I am honestly not surprised.
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
#18
Quote by theogonia777
You've got to be kidding me. Fret noise is a legitimate problem? Yeah, okay? One of the greatest inventions for the electric guitar of the 20th century? What about:

-pickups
-solid bodies
-tone/volume pots
-amplifiers
-distortion pedals
-tremolo bridges
-adjustable saddles
-reverb units
-delay pedals
-humbuckers

You know, things that can actually be a major benefit?


I should have said guitar neck . I think I got my answer though . They are a little more tricky to make and people don't care anyway .
Sorry for wrong forum .
#19
Quote by necrosis1193
...stratocasters, RGs, plenty of amazing guitars that have sold millions of units over the decades and been a part of records that have sold similarly have had non compound radius fretboards. You don't mess with success, especially with how slow a lot of musicians are to adapt to changes in their tools.


Most RGs have compound radiuses.

The top of the line Fender MIA Strats have had them for years--the American Deluxe Strats have them, and the Custom Shop offers 3 variations of compound radiuses. It's not that expensive, they just charge $160, so that means it costs them like $40 more to do it with their second highest-paid category of workers.

Yeah, most Strats don't have them; hell, most Strats only have 21 frets. But if you know your way around a Strat and you like a compound radius, Fender will happily give you what you want, for a modest premium--relative to other major guitar companies.
#20
"Nex" is fucking stupid.
Last edited by derek8520 at Aug 22, 2015,
#21
Quote by SpeedSterHR
Most RGs have compound radiuses.


Oh yeah? Prove it.
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#23
Your question made me have a doubt. Maybe someone can answer

I have Fender Am Stratocaster Deluxe HSS made in 2006 (serial code DZ6)...

¿Does my guitar has compound radius neck? I tried to google it for 30 minutes, but i only could find thes pecs from the ones of 2015!

Since i bought the guitar in 2006 is the only thing i had played :P. Amazing guitar
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#24
Quote by tiky
Your question made me have a doubt. Maybe someone can answer

I have Fender Am Stratocaster Deluxe HSS made in 2006 (serial code DZ6)...

¿Does my guitar has compound radius neck? I tried to google it for 30 minutes, but i only could find thes pecs from the ones of 2015!

Since i bought the guitar in 2006 is the only thing i had played :P. Amazing guitar


No, 9.5 radius. Great guitar though, congratulations!
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
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#25
Quote by theogonia777
Oh yeah? Prove it.

Nevermind, for the RGs I remembered it wrong. I was confusing radius with the neck thickness difference at each end.

Thanks for setting me straight on that.