#1
Hello My friends!! Soo long i haven´t come here!

Soo.... I got some questions 4 the experts in guitar!

Recently i had bought a new saddle (a fixed one, the "normal type") to install in my schecter 6 to replace my floyd rose setup - witch i hate lool.

So my brilliant ideia was -

Remove the floyd rose.

Install the new fixed saddle rigth under the floyd rose hole

And re-string my guitar.


Everything it´s awesome! untillll.. I check my intonation.

A very noob move, yes yes... but my question is -

Can i still use the new installed saddle or the position of the saddle must be exactlly where the old setup was?

Thanks my friends!!
#2
I would think they would have to be in the same spot as the old one or the scale length has been changed?
#3
Quote by esky15
I would think they would have to be in the same spot as the old one or the scale length has been changed?

Yeah... I guess it´s like that! very sad for it. ..
#4
If the new bridge is not in the same position as the old one, then there lies your problem.

Can you show us pics of what you have done?
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I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
#6
Oh my god

Why couldn't you have just blocked your Floyd Rose? Why did you feel the need to attempt to put in an entirely new bridge in, and end up putting it so far out of the correct position that it may as well be positioned on the planet Jupiter?
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Aug 23, 2015,
#7
Ahaha love it!

Soo... the floyd rose setup was old and some pieces had broken down.. change the strings was just damn near to impossible... so replace the floys with a fixed saddle... But just forget bout the intonation!

Got it?
#8
Why don't you just replace the Floyd or at least, replace the parts that are broken?
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
#9
Replace the parts no, because i dont want to continue with the floyd...

Replace the floyd? with what? Another one? maybe my only way to correct this now it´s to apply some new wood to fill the floyd hole and apply the fixed saddle in there...
#10
The most practical way to deal with this would be to put the Floyd back (or another Floyd, or something else two-point like a Schaller vintage trem) and block it if you don't want to deal with the floating. There is no sensible way to replace that with a fixed bridge.
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#11
Quote by filipe.bento.89 at #33563705
Replace the parts no, because i dont want to continue with the floyd...

Replace the floyd? with what? Another one? maybe my only way to correct this now it´s to apply some new wood to fill the floyd hole and apply the fixed saddle in there...

So why don't you just block the Floyd? If there are parts on the Floyd that are broken, replace them so that you can make the bridge serviceable, and then block it.

I personally think you're wasting your time trying to convert the guitar to a fixed bridge. There's simply no practical or realistic way to convert a guitar from a Floyd to a fixed bridge. Filling the huge Floyd cavity is one thing, but getting that kind of work done to a good standard is very, very difficult and expensive. It'll probably cost more to get that kind of work done than what the guitar is actually worth. And it'll completely obliterate the guitar's resale value. As if drilling holes for a new bridge behind the Floyd cavity hasn't already done that.

If you buy a guitar with a Floyd, you're pretty much stuck with it. If you don't want a Floyd, buy a new guitar that doesn't have one.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Aug 23, 2015,
#13
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
So why don't you just block the Floyd? If there are parts on the Floyd that are broken, replace them so that you can make the bridge serviceable, and then block it.

I personally think you're wasting your time trying to convert the guitar to a fixed bridge. There's simply no practical or realistic way to convert a guitar from a Floyd to a fixed bridge. Filling the huge Floyd cavity is one thing, but getting that kind of work done to a good standard is very, very difficult and expensive. It'll probably cost more to get that kind of work done than what the guitar is actually worth. And it'll completely obliterate the guitar's resale value. As if drilling holes for a new bridge behind the Floyd cavity hasn't already done that.

If you buy a guitar with a Floyd, you're pretty much stuck with it. If you don't want a Floyd, buy a new guitar that doesn't have one.


Yea, unless you are very good woodworker, filling that cavity and all the work that goes into it is not worth it. It would be cheaper to buy a new Floyd and get it installed than to fill in the cavity.