#2
Not enough data.

What guitar?
What were the old strings (manufacturer and gauge)
What are the new strings? (same)

Have you ever restrung this guitar? Any Guitar?

In short what you've done so far is tell us "My car is broken, what's wrong with it?".
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#3
I'm guessing there was a different gauge of strings on there before, and now you have fret buzz because of the change in tension.
#4
It's a Tanglewood strat-style guitar, The new strings are Ernie Ball Regular Slinky gauges are 10,13,17,26,36,46. I don't know what the old strings were they came with the guitar I got around 2009, they had colour-coded ball ends don't know if that helps identify them. I've restrung this guitar just the g.b and high e strings and my acoustic quite a few times and never had this problem, maybe it's a dud string?
#6
You need to find a string set for Black Key tuning and set your guitar up for it. You can’t just throw a standard string set on guitar set up for E tuning and expect it to play well in F#-A#-C#-F#-A#-F#.
#7
I'm not surprised some of your strings snapped when you went up almost 2 steps on a couple strings. Something probably isn't sitting right because of the extra tension on the thicker strings.
You need to figure out what sort of set is right for that. Like jpnyc said.
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#8
Restring your guitar with something more sensible for that tuning. Especially as your 4th, 5th and 6th strings were 6 years old. Yuck. I replace strings on a monthly basis on my guitars.

I think the best way to get around this with 10-46 is to tune a whole step below Curtis' black key tuning, and then capoing the 2nd fret. That way you don't keep breaking strings.

Or alternatively just get strings more appropriate for the job.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Aug 27, 2015,
#10
Quote by cactus-dude at #33570787
Im in regular tuning now, I was just giving background on why the original strings snapped, in case that had any bearing on the current sound, maybe I just got used to the sound of the old Low E string that was over 6 years old.

That is absolutely a possibility.

Strings that old will sound incredibly dull and crappy. If you're so used to them, new strings are going to sound much, much brighter, the way they're supposed to.
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#11
Also, if you need to tune up you probably need to find a short scale guitar. Fender and PRS/PRS SE both have 24" scales that would be suitable if used with light strings.
#12
I think its just the sound of new strings. And please start changing them more reguraly. My heart aches when i hear that guitars have 6 year old strings
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#13
Di'addario have those color coded ball ends. After a few days to a week of playing your strings shouldn't be so tinny sounding.
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#14
Maybe you've found the brown tone since your strings sound like sh*t


Most factory setups are usually done on 9s, most likely Chinese low quality standard 9 set. You'll have to get a new setup and stick to that gauge strings so you won't have to re-tweak it.