#1
Just wondering what laquer they use? I know some models seem to be oil finished, and there's matte and glossy finishes, but I was wondering if anyone knew it to be poly or nitro?
#4
Quote by dspellman
And you're not asking Mayones why?

Mayones are known to be very secretive considering their manufacturing processes. If you have nothing helpful to say than please refrain from doing so at-all.
Last edited by dragonzrmetal at Aug 30, 2015,
#5
Quote by dragonzrmetal
Mayones are known to be very secretive considering their manufacturing processes. If you have nothing helpful to say than please refrain from doing so at-all.

That still doesn't mean you've actually sent them an email.

"Dear sir/madam

I own one of your very wonderful guitars, but I recently chipped/scratched/had violent sex with the finish. This hasn't affected how the guitar sounds or plays, but I'd like to repair it nonetheless. Can you tell me whether it's a nitro ot poly finish, so i don;t make things worse?

Thanks"

What's the worst that could happen?
#6
Quote by slapsymcdougal
That still doesn't mean you've actually sent them an email.

"Dear sir/madam

I own one of your very wonderful guitars, but I recently chipped/scratched/had violent sex with the finish. This hasn't affected how the guitar sounds or plays, but I'd like to repair it nonetheless. Can you tell me whether it's a nitro ot poly finish, so i don;t make things worse?

Thanks"

What's the worst that could happen?



^^ What he said lol
GUITARS:
PRS Custom 24 (Black Slate 10 top w/birds)
ESP E-II Horizon NT-III (RDB)
ESP Eclipse II - Snow White

AMPS:
Mesa Rectoverb combo
#7
Quote by dragonzrmetal
Mayones are known to be very secretive considering their manufacturing processes. If you have nothing helpful to say than please refrain from doing so at-all.


I have absolutely NO idea why you're not seeking this information from the source.
I'm willing to bet that if they appear at the Winter NAMM (they did last year) and if I take a couple of them out for beers afterwards, I'll know everything there is to know.*

Here's the extent of the help that I can offer at this time (I *have* emailed them to ask them as of a couple of minutes ago because I don't subscribe to whatever stupid sources you have that are making you too chicken to do so).

If you read their owner's manual (I'm making assumptions here), you'll find that they suggest "thoroughly cleaning the instrument after each playing session" and they note that sweat residue decreases the gloss of the finish...Products based on acids, alkalis, benzene, gasoline, alcohols, solvents and strong detergents, should not be used." While it's likely that these same cautions would be given for a polyurethane, crosslinked alkylid or polyester type finish, my impression is that their finishes are lacquer (likely nitrocellulose).

*They're very forthcoming with everything else...here's a list of the bits and pieces of the guitar they had up as the last NAMM's "Guitar of the Day:"

Mayones Regius 7M Custom, Flamed Maple 4A top - Trans Jeans Black Matt finish, Mahogany Khaya body wings, 11-ply Maple | Mahogany | Wenge | Amazakoe neck-thru-body section, Trans Natural Matt back finish, Ebony fingerboard, 16" Radius, 24 Ferd Wagner medium jumbo frets, 25.4" scale, Pearloid black side dot marker only, 3-ply white ABS / gray acrylic binding, Seymour Duncan SH-4-7 JB and SH-2-7 Jazz humbucker pickups, Electroswitch Electronic Products 3-positon slide pickup selector, Volume (push-pull for dual coil-tap) and Tone control, Bourns pots, Speed type black knobs, ABM 3257 strings-thru-body bridge, Sperzel Guitar Tuners Trim-Lok 4+3 locking machine heads, Graph Tech Guitar Labs Black Tusq nut, Schaller Security Lock, Switchcraft output, SIT Strings 10-60."


They've identified every single manufacturer of every metal part right down to the model.

"Secretive" my muscular butt.

There's nothing secretive about the process of building a guitar. They use absolutely stock components, ordinary woods, etc., with the exception that their fretwire comes from the veins in the wings of the famous but elusive Polski Nikiel-Srebro Fairy (Ferd Wagner pulls off their wings during the Summer Solstice and they move to West Hollywood until their wings grow back).
#8
Quote by dspellman
I have absolutely NO idea why you're not seeking this information from the source.
I'm willing to bet that if they appear at the Winter NAMM (they did last year) and if I take a couple of them out for beers afterwards, I'll know everything there is to know.*

Here's the extent of the help that I can offer at this time (I *have* emailed them to ask them as of a couple of minutes ago because I don't subscribe to whatever stupid sources you have that are making you too chicken to do so).

If you read their owner's manual (I'm making assumptions here), you'll find that they suggest "thoroughly cleaning the instrument after each playing session" and they note that sweat residue decreases the gloss of the finish...Products based on acids, alkalis, benzene, gasoline, alcohols, solvents and strong detergents, should not be used." While it's likely that these same cautions would be given for a polyurethane, crosslinked alkylid or polyester type finish, my impression is that their finishes are lacquer (likely nitrocellulose).

*They're very forthcoming with everything else...here's a list of the bits and pieces of the guitar they had up as the last NAMM's "Guitar of the Day:"

Mayones Regius 7M Custom, Flamed Maple 4A top - Trans Jeans Black Matt finish, Mahogany Khaya body wings, 11-ply Maple | Mahogany | Wenge | Amazakoe neck-thru-body section, Trans Natural Matt back finish, Ebony fingerboard, 16" Radius, 24 Ferd Wagner medium jumbo frets, 25.4" scale, Pearloid black side dot marker only, 3-ply white ABS / gray acrylic binding, Seymour Duncan SH-4-7 JB and SH-2-7 Jazz humbucker pickups, Electroswitch Electronic Products 3-positon slide pickup selector, Volume (push-pull for dual coil-tap) and Tone control, Bourns pots, Speed type black knobs, ABM 3257 strings-thru-body bridge, Sperzel Guitar Tuners Trim-Lok 4+3 locking machine heads, Graph Tech Guitar Labs Black Tusq nut, Schaller Security Lock, Switchcraft output, SIT Strings 10-60."


They've identified every single manufacturer of every metal part right down to the model.

"Secretive" my muscular butt.

There's nothing secretive about the process of building a guitar. They use absolutely stock components, ordinary woods, etc., with the exception that their fretwire comes from the veins in the wings of the famous but elusive Polski Nikiel-Srebro Fairy (Ferd Wagner pulls off their wings during the Summer Solstice and they move to West Hollywood until their wings grow back).


Many thanks for doing so, given what you have said it would have been sensible, the reason I assumed a policy of some secrecy is that I've enquired before concerning how the gothic ash tops are achieved and was advised that Mayones was not letting anything on about the process.

No, I don't actually have a Mayones as I think you inferred, I wish; I was interested because I much prefer how a nitro finish ages as opposed to poly, and if there was a difference between models it would influence a future purchase.

I'm shocked to hear about the extent of fairy exploitation going on, I thought it was just rumours and nothing more. God knows what the RSPCA would make of this.
#9
Quote by dragonzrmetal
I was interested because I much prefer how a nitro finish ages as opposed to poly, and if there was a difference between models it would influence a future purchase.


[Lecture Coming. Run Away!]

Nitro finishes don't age any particular way, nor do they age consistently. I have a lot of nitro-finished guitars and, honestly, most of them have ambered slightly and NOT done a lot of the serious checking, etc., that you see on some of them, leastways on Gibsons. All of my Gibsons but one date from before 1980 (one dates to 1949). They haven't been in their cases all their lives, either -- one has been around the world with me at least 2.5 times.

This is an original '59 Burst. I nearly swapped Rumble Seat Music in Ithaca, NY a vintage car for it in 2010. Sorta glad I didn't -- the car is now worth more than twice what the guitar is at this point. But they had TWO '59's at the time, and the second one looked like it had been birthed by an alligator. It was just one color (burst color long since gone) and checked and cracked and flaking and rusted and discolored and seriously nasty, while this one looks nearly new.




So you may get a Mayones with a lacquer finish, keep it 60 years and find that it really hasn't "aged" much at all. More to the point, statistics say you won't own that guitar even remotely that long.

There are ways to make a guitar look old and worn, but to me that's a fashion statement, like fake worn jeans. I'm not sure what the charm is, but there are even vinyl wraps (Google "rust wrap") that are supposed to make your new car look like a beater so that it gets ignored in bad neighborhoods. Fact is, you can use the same stuff to wrap your guitar to make it look old and used (companies like axewraps.com). Various vendors, around $40. If you get tired of it, just peel it off and the underlying paint has been protected and is good as new:






Honestly, I don't care for nitrocellulose lacquer finishes. They get sticky if exposed to sweat (and sometimes they never harden up after that). They react badly to various chemicals (rubber bumpers on guitar stands, some case interiors, etc.) including a whole raft of solvents. They pick up unwanted colors (a whole spate of white Customs turning purple inside purple plush Gibson cases), they stain easily, etc.

In short, for me, a purchase decision would almost always be made *away* from a nitrocellulose lacquer finish (last six guitar have NOT been lacquer).
Last edited by dspellman at Aug 30, 2015,
#10
Quote by dragonzrmetal

I'm shocked to hear about the extent of fairy exploitation going on, I thought it was just rumours and nothing more. God knows what the RSPCA would make of this.


Apparently, crime boss Rumpledforeskin is behind it all...
#11
Quote by slapsymcdougal
It's Mayonnaise.


lolol - sorry couldn't help it lol
GUITARS:
PRS Custom 24 (Black Slate 10 top w/birds)
ESP E-II Horizon NT-III (RDB)
ESP Eclipse II - Snow White

AMPS:
Mesa Rectoverb combo
#12
Quote by slapsymcdougal
It's Mayonnaise.


Beat me to it. That's why they're so secretive.
Quote by Roc8995
Yes, and people still got polio and you had to crank your car up by hand and put whale oil in the lamps every night.

Things are better now.


Quote by dannyalcatraz
Style is in the hands. Taste is in the hands. But tone? Tone is in the gear.
#13
Quote by dragonzrmetal
Just wondering what laquer they use? I know some models seem to be oil finished, and there's matte and glossy finishes, but I was wondering if anyone knew it to be poly or nitro?


Okay, we have a definitive answer. As stated earlier, I emailed Mayones and asked them what finishes they used, and received a reply (spelling is Pawel's):

We use poliester for gloss finishes, poliuretan for matt finishes.
You can use Clou for Oil finish service.


Best Regards
Paweł Smakulski
Mayones Sales