#1
Are there any hidden costs or extra work when building a Warmoth? I want a Cabronita. I read about how to drill holes into a guitar without cracking the finish but that seems like a lot of extra work. Do you recommend getting a guitar without a pickguard? And how are the necks? Should I include money for fret leveling and rolling in my budget?

The body would be ash. The neck would be wenge with a padouk fretboard. I would love gold hardware but they only offer the American Standard Flatmount Bridge routing and that only comes in chrome. Are there any other bridges that fit that route? And will I need string retainers with a standard Tele neck? Is there anything else I should consider or any problems I would encounter with this build?
#2
I've considered biulding a bitsa, and it would be Warmoth parts, because the s/h W Pro neck I bought years ago is very good.

One suggestion I have is to keep track of you parts, prices and options on a spreadsheet, to avoid making a mistake or having cost overruns.

A question I would have for the experts. Is a wenge/padouk neck likely to cause neck dive, given the location of the front strap button on a tele?
#3
Be careful really examine the total cost and compare... you can easily end up paying the same amount on parts as buying retail, and that's ok if you have the time and enjoy the experience of building. The setups can be tricky and nut string slots can ride high then you might need to pay for that. (happened to me)

It really is a lot of work especially if you work or go to school full time and you never built a guitar before.
#4
1. Warmoth frets are merely pressed in. They're not finished, nor are they necessarily level. You need to spend the bucks to have them done properly.

2. Don't assume that any of this fits together properly or that things will not need careful shimming and measurement. You shouldn't expect to simply screw the guitar together and go.

3. Buy things already painted. Don't make plans to finish it yourself unless you're an expert. You'll likely end up with a goopy linseed-oil finish that everyone tries to tell is "fine. No, it really is. It looks...uh...fine."

4. Don't ever plan to sell it for anything remotely near what you have in it. Fill in your spreadsheet, cut that in half and then count yourself extremely lucky if you get within throwing distance of that amount.

5. Have a really good tech put it together, pay to have it PLEK'd and then lie your ass off when you tell people that you did it yourself. If you do NOT have a really good tech put it together and then have it PLEK'd, they'll tell YOU that it looks like you did it yourself.

6. Finally, don't bother with any of the above. Putting together a guitar, like building a kit car, is something you undertake if you really really know what you're doing. Otherwise it's an interesting project that will teach you the first sentence of #6. <G>.
#5
Quote by JELIFISH19
Are there any hidden costs or extra work when building a Warmoth? I want a Cabronita. I read about how to drill holes into a guitar without cracking the finish but that seems like a lot of extra work. Do you recommend getting a guitar without a pickguard?

Can't possibly answer that for you. Keep in mind that as long as you don't crack the finish too bad you'll immediately cover it up with the pickguard.
And how are the necks?

They're generally good. They vary a lot, as do any such products, but the quality is fine.
Should I include money for fret leveling and rolling in my budget?

Yes. Well, rolling is an optional, preferential thing, but you'll want a level and polish on a Warmoth neck.
The body would be ash. The neck would be wenge with a padouk fretboard. I would love gold hardware but they only offer the American Standard Flatmount Bridge routing and that only comes in chrome. Are there any other bridges that fit that route?

Plenty. Some straight from Warmoth.
http://www.warmoth.com/Strat-Flat-Mount-Bridge-Vintage-Spacing-Gold-P581C703.aspx
And will I need string retainers with a standard Tele neck?

Yes, unless you use staggered tuners.
Is there anything else I should consider or any problems I would encounter with this build?

Based on the type of questions you're asking, I'd say yes. If you're this unfamiliar with the process, you're going to come across some things you hadn't thought of. The bad news is that it's pretty hard to know what you don't know. The good news is that the easy way to fix it is to learn by doing. Jump in, make mistakes, you'll be fine.

As spellman says above, you're probably going to screw this up if you haven't done it before. If you don't already know how to shim a neck, measure and adjust relief, or drill a hole in a painted guitar, you might be better off practicing on a cheap beater guitar before you mess up some nice parts. Building a guitar can be a great learning experience, but as a general rule "learned a lot" and "made a great guitar on the first try" are not phrases that go together.
#6
I'm not planning on selling it and I was planning on buying a finished body. I can setup my own guitars and also install electronics. I just can't do anything involving fret or nut filing so I would leave that up to a tech. But if a choose to not get a pickguard, are the only holes I need to drill going to be the strap button screws and the string retainer? Having a tech install the ferrules and shim the neck if necessary shouldn't be a huge deal, right?

And that gold bridge doesn't fit the American Standard Flat Mount routing.
#7
Hello all,

I am new here, and I was wondering if I can ask questions about guitars I am working on? Maybe I need to ask in a luthier forum, but I figured I would start here since I had an account.

As for the guy building a Warmoth, I have played one and it was nice. I don;t know who built it since it was in a shop, but the parts were top notch with good play-ability.

As for guitars, not even close to a kit car. I have built 2 of them(kitcars), and they took years, where I think building a guitar can take a few weeks or weekends. I will admit I never did much of the bodywork, other than roughing in and attaching the panels.
Attachments:
car1.jpg
car2.jpg
Last edited by howarddavidp at Sep 2, 2015,
#8
^The reference dspellman was making was that it is a learning experience and be prepared to run into road blocks. Shelling out decent money, as a lot of warmoth parts are ,is not something recommended to someone building their first guitar. I built my first guitar from a kit. It was a great learning experience, but it was just that. Ultimately it was a waste of money once I replaced all the parts and electronics I would have been better off buying a guitar that was already manufactured. I still don't play that guitar.
Gibson LP traditional and DC standard, PRS S2 Custom 24, MIA Standard Strat, Schecter Banshee 7
EVH 5153, Orange TV50H 2-2x12's
Line 6 M13
#9
Quote by howarddavidp

As for guitars, not even close to a kit car. I have built 2 of them(kitcars), and they took years, where I think building a guitar can take a few weeks or weekends. I will admit I never did much of the bodywork, other than roughing in and attaching the panels.


Nice job. I've helped build one kit car (a Factory Five Cobra replica) and one airplane (a Lancair IV) and both are still on the road/in the air and doing well. And no, I don't have skills; I was monkey labor. That said, I've done one guitar from Warmoth bits I picked up dirt cheap on eBay from folks who threw up their hands on their projects, and I've got my eye on a Factory Five '33 Hot Rod kit (I intend to call in a whole LOT of favors).
#10
Quote by howarddavidp
As for guitars, not even close to a kit car. I have built 2 of them(kitcars), and they took years, where I think building a guitar can take a few weeks or weekends. I will admit I never did much of the bodywork, other than roughing in and attaching the panels.


You built a ****ing car?!!?!
i dont even change my oil.
also my guitar build failed miserably.
never used warmoth.
this post is pointless.