#1
Hey man!
After I've been playing my friends bass for some time now, i've decided its time to get my own!

These are the ones I've been looking at:

http://www.thomann.de/dk/epiphone_thunderbird_iv_ebass.htm

http://www.thomann.de/dk/schecter_diamond_stiletto_deluxe_4_blue.htm

Which one should I settle for?

-


Amp wise, I think I'll be getting an orange;

http://www.thomann.de/dk/orange_cr50bx.htm

Will this be ok for now?
#2
Both of these basses are good instruments.

But I think I'd go for the Schecter, for one specific reason: The Thunderbirds are heavy basses and are very neck heavy and are prone to neck dive.
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
#3
Yeah okay man!
It doesn't matter what I'll be playing genre wise?

I'll be playing stuff like Seether, A7X, 5FDP...
#4
I think your amp choice will leave you disappointed. It would be best suited for a small 20 seat cafe acoustic gig. You'd be tired of fighting the guitarist(s) for volume and looking for a new amp in less than a year. You'd probably be better served by something like a GK MB112 or Ampeg BA115. You will get much more headroom out of something like one of those. Eventually you'll outgrow those, too. But they will be pertinent for much longer.

...and oh yeah...welcome to the family!
"Quick to judge. Quick to anger. Slow to understand. Ignorance and prejudice and fear walk hand-in-hand."
- Rush, "Witch Hunt"
Last edited by deeptubes at Sep 2, 2015,
#5
Quote by deeptubes
I think your amp choice will leave you disappointed. It would be best suited for a small 20 seat cafe acoustic gig. You'd be tired of fighting the guitarist(s) for volume and looking for a new amp in less than a year. You'd probably be better served by something like a GK MB112 or Ampeg BA115. You will get much more headroom out of something like one of those. Eventually you'll outgrow those, too. But they will be pertinent for much longer.

...and oh yeah...welcome to the family!


Hey man, thanks for you input.
However, I'll only be playing the bass in my bedroom for now?
#6
Then proper tone can be thrown out of the window. Get like whatever cheap amp you can get, if you start gigging get a TC Electronics combo or something.
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
#7
Quote by Guitar0player
Then proper tone can be thrown out of the window. Get like whatever cheap amp you can get, if you start gigging get a TC Electronics combo or something.


Hahahahaha. Alright man.
#8
Squier Vintage Modern Precision Bass

Played one in Amber, beautiful instrument for only 320 euro.
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Nicest compliment on my looks:
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Putting the 'sex' in 'convicted sex offender'.
#9
I've never played/owned a Schecter. I have played (not owned) a Thunderbird. Just my opinion, take it with a grain of salt - but the Thunderbirds are heavy, klunky, with thick necks. If you are okay with this, then by all means choose it.

Have you already looked at other basses and have narrowed the search down to these two, or are you open to suggestions? In the same price range, you can get a Squier Vintage Modern Jazz or P-Bass, an Ibanez Soundgear SR300 series, or an Ernie Ball Sterling Ray (not the Musicman Stingray and not the Sterling Sub series). These basses are all very versatile with a big range of tonal possibilities.

No matter which one you eventually select, the biggest advice I can give is to put Sound and Playability at the top of the priority list. Buy the bass that feels best in your hands and sounds best to you.
#10
I got a Fender modern player Jazz Bass, it's awesome and cheap.
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
#11
Quote by smtp4me
I've never played/owned a Schecter. I have played (not owned) a Thunderbird. Just my opinion, take it with a grain of salt - but the Thunderbirds are heavy, klunky, with thick necks. If you are okay with this, then by all means choose it.

Have you already looked at other basses and have narrowed the search down to these two, or are you open to suggestions? In the same price range, you can get a Squier Vintage Modern Jazz or P-Bass, an Ibanez Soundgear SR300 series, or an Ernie Ball Sterling Ray (not the Musicman Stingray and not the Sterling Sub series). These basses are all very versatile with a big range of tonal possibilities.

No matter which one you eventually select, the biggest advice I can give is to put Sound and Playability at the top of the priority list. Buy the bass that feels best in your hands and sounds best to you.


I have to say, that Ibanez looks interesting!