#1
So the other day I was having breakfast with my girlfriend and I was on my phone looking at this Agile guitar:

http://www.rondomusic.com/SEPTORelt627mnemgobflame.html

I was admiring it on my phone while we were eating and I showed it to her. A few hours later I'm at home and I get a text with a picture of the "thank you for your order" screen. She bought me the guitar. Definitely happy about it but didn't at the time realize that it was a 27" scale guitar. I'm going to keep it since it's a gift, but I've only ever played 25.5 and 24.75 scale guitars. Will this guitar come tuned in E standard? Will stretches be impossible now? Are there any advantages? I read that this is in the range of a baritone guitar scale length. Should I dedicate this guitar to a lower tuning and buy heavier gauge strings? Thanks for any input
#2
Interesting, the specs say it comes with 9-42 strings, and a wide neck. Since it is only one fret longer than a standard scale, it should tune OK to E standard with those strings. I bet it has a lot of "twang". Stretches could be a problem if you have small hands, but the trade-off is that playing on the high frets can be easier.

There are all sorts of string and tuning options. For example, my favourite guitar for slide is a 30" bari with 13-56 strings tuned to open D. It feels very tight, but the sound is terrific with decent pickups.
#3
It will probably ship with heavier strings and won't be tuned to E standard.

Stretches will be more difficult; some may be impossible.

Yes, now is the time to open yourself to trying alternative tunings.

Most of all, thank your GF and enjoy your adventure!
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#4
Will this guitar come tuned in E standard?

Probably. I doubt they’d use .09s for tuning down.

Will stretches be impossible now?

Longer stretches on the low frets, more space to play chords higher up.

Are there any advantages?

You can tune it down to A# (WATA!) with a set of .011s. Or get some stupid heavy strings and tune down to F and play Bongripper covers. Or you can play those funky high Prince chords much more comfortably.

Should I dedicate this guitar to a lower tuning and buy heavier gauge strings?

Probably and string gauge depends on how low you want to go. As I noted above, you don’t need to get very heavy with a 27" scale until you start getting below A. But if you want a snappier—as opposed to sludgey—sound, heavier strings and a baritone guitar mix well.
#5
Yes, they're significantly bigger than a 25.5in. Certain stretches will be impossible depending on the stretch and the size of your hand, but certain stretches were already impossible on a 24.75in or 25.5in anyway. It's just that more are impossible now. In some cases, though, you might be able to get away with just moving the note down a string, which may or may not alter the tone).

You'll get a tighter response on a 9-42 than a 9-42 on a 25.5in. I think in general that's always a good idea, even more so if you play very djenty stuff or complicated rhythm.

You can always bring the guitar to a lower tuning, but you don't have to just based on the scale length. Take a look at what you need. Try playing with it first. You might end up liking the feel more and have it become your main E standard guitar.
#6
You don't strictly have to tune lower, but if you already have guitars dedicated to standard tuning, why not try something else? A different tuning can really open up different ideas.

And while it is true some stretches will be harder, it is A LOT easier to play on higher frets with a longer scale. I have a 26,5" guitar, and while the difference is noticeable, it's not an issue for me despite my small hands, and it really is a lot more comfortable to play higher up the neck.
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
There's no point in trying to convince a moron.
#7
Trust me, the difference is not that big at all.

I used to play 24.5 and 25.5 inch necks but now I near-exclusively play 26.5 and 27.

You can easily tune to E standard (or higher!) with a 27 inch scale, it just depends on the gauges you use.
#8
Quote by Surf1975
So the other day I was having breakfast with my girlfriend and I was on my phone looking at this Agile guitar:

http://www.rondomusic.com/SEPTORelt627mnemgobflame.html

I was admiring it on my phone while we were eating and I showed it to her. A few hours later I'm at home and I get a text with a picture of the "thank you for your order" screen. She bought me the guitar. Definitely happy about it but didn't at the time realize that it was a 27" scale guitar. I'm going to keep it since it's a gift, but I've only ever played 25.5 and 24.75 scale guitars. Will this guitar come tuned in E standard? Will stretches be impossible now? Are there any advantages? I read that this is in the range of a baritone guitar scale length. Should I dedicate this guitar to a lower tuning and buy heavier gauge strings? Thanks for any input


DON"T PANIC.
27" is a great scale to work with. It's really nice to work with as an E standard tuning, and stretches and bending will be far more normal than what you're hearing from these guys.

Jim Soloway used to build his SWAN series guitars in a 27" scale for jazz musicians, who absolutely adored the bit of extra space for those fancy chords in the middle of the neck. It'll feel pretty much like a 25.5" guitar.

Your bottom end strings will sound really nice and powerful. You'll be able to down tune this guitar if you want to, certainly, and it CAN be tuned to a baritone tuning if you wish. I wouldn't bother.

And Oh, By The Way. Amazing Girlfriend.
If you don't want either the guitar OR the girlfriend, ship them out here to LA.
Last edited by dspellman at Sep 3, 2015,