#2
I would say it's in Em. The chords are Am-Bm-C-D-D#dim-Em-D/F#-G-E7/G#-Am-D7/F#-G-Em-F-B7/D#-Em.

A lot of diatonic stuff, some secondary dominants. E7 is the secondary dominant for Am, the V/iv. You could also analyze the D7 chord as a secondary dominant (even though it's diatonic to the key) for G major. That's because it kind of briefly modulates to G major. I would call that a tonicization. The key doesn't really change, but G major feels like the tonic for a short time.


The song uses both D major and D# diminished, and also both B minor and major. Nothing strange about that - it uses both harmonic and natural minor, which is very common.
Quote by AlanHB
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#3
Quote by MaggaraMarine
I would say it's in Em. The chords are Am-Bm-C-D-D#dim-Em-D/F#-G-E7/G#-Am-D7/F#-G-Em-F-B7/D#-Em.

A lot of diatonic stuff, some secondary dominants. E7 is the secondary dominant for Am, the V/iv. You could also analyze the D7 chord as a secondary dominant (even though it's diatonic to the key) for G major. That's because it kind of briefly modulates to G major. I would call that a tonicization. The key doesn't really change, but G major feels like the tonic for a short time.


The song uses both D major and D# diminished, and also both B minor and major. Nothing strange about that - it uses both harmonic and natural minor, which is very common.


Thanks Maggara! It was mainly the E7/G# chord that threw me off a bit and forward. Even if I know how to play the chords it's a bit strange to hear them being used in that context. I generally think in roman numerals instead of actually chord numbers so I heard...

ii, iii, IV, V,

but then I'm never sure how to analyze the diminished chord. Borrowing the 7th from harmonic minor I usually interpret it in my head as a 5 & 1/2 even though its completely wrong.

Then going to vi

Then the next chord always confuses me to. I understand what chord type it is but because it's undiatonic I don't really know how to interpret it.

The rest of the progression I deal with the same issue. I see why you would say that G Major seems like the tonic. The first part of the progression is largely diatonic. It was more the later part that I needed help with.

Thank you so much!
#4
I would analyze the whole thing in E minor, so it would be iv-v-VI-(b)VII-viio-i-V/III-III-V7/iv-iv-V7/III-III-i-bII-V7-i.

The D#dim chord is diatonic to E minor. There are two actual non-diatonic chords and they are the F major and E7/G# chords.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#5
Quote by MaggaraMarine
I would analyze the whole thing in E minor, so it would be iv-v-VI-(b)VII-viio-i-V/III-III-V7/iv-iv-V7/III-III-i-bII-V7-i.

The D#dim chord is diatonic to E minor. There are two actual non-diatonic chords and they are the F major and E7/G# chords.


Ahh I see! This is probably where a lot of my mistakes come from.

I have a really bad habit of analyzing everything in major. Probably something I'm going to start changing from this day forward. The (b)VII makes sense since the progression is originally only in minor until the viio which borrows the #7 from harmonic minor. I'll take a look at this in more detail later on until I can really understand it. Until then thanks so much for taking the time to check it out.
#6
Mag is spot on.

Technically it's all just in a minor key. We don't really have music that's "in X minor", it just all lumps together and takes what it needs from each thing.
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