#1
I've been back playing guitar for maybe 1 months been playing mostly in excess of two hours a day sadly very stop start and not very targeted though anyway.

I notice for more or less the 30 minutes I am crap at lead or solo stuff...I need a warm up and a long one? I am very inaccurate and just garbage and stuff I was kind of playing last night?

It's mostly the fast stuff right on on my technique. I also notice this in Master of Puppets as well riffs wise coming into those riffs cold I simply tense up and lose it...if I've been playing an hour though I can probably play it.

THEN comes the let down about 1.45 minutes or so my little finger becomes stiff and my ring finger becomes fatigued and more...inaccuracy occurs I generally just call it quits because

To push through and practice things with mistakes 30 minutes ago I was doing without mistakes feels pointless and frustrating.

My hands really don't have much stamina. Any tips for warming up faster and I guess playing longer?
Last edited by MyOceanToSwim at Sep 3, 2015,
#2
I'd recommend listening to your body's complaints. If it hurts to play, stop playing (or find a way around it). Playing an electric I can cheat and wear thin gloves on my fretting hand (thanks power chords!), but acoustic I can't cheat like that.

I'd suggest some stretches of your fingers before playing. Maybe flex them thoroughly in the car on the way home from work or school. I think a "stress ball" would help you quite a bit in developing flexability/strength. Maybe one of those "grip strengthener" would do you some good.

http://www.amazon.com/Gripmaster-Exerciser-Tension-9-Pounds-Finger/dp/B0006GCBL4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1441301099&sr=8-1&keywords=grip+exerciser

Personally stretches don't seem to have an effect on my fingers. This morning woke up and played cold (and very well, for me), whereas yesterday I played like crap after being warmed up (in the afternoon) all day.

Regarding practicing through mistakes...I think that is considered a mistake. I do it, mind you, but I hear it's a mistake.
Last edited by TobusRex at Sep 3, 2015,
#3
There is definitely a warmup period for me, and it is definitely significant for the faster more intricate stuff, but it doesn't take me an hour to get warmed up. That seems like a long time. You might need to find some warmup routine you can blast through to get you going.

I have zero "cool down" maybe there is something off you're doing technique wise. I feel like I could play forever, but I can't think of any technique or reason why.

You could try this though, it might help

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSrfB7JIzxY
#4
Quote by TobusRex


Regarding practicing through mistakes...I think that is considered a mistake. I do it, mind you, but I hear it's a mistake.


If you keep practicing your mistakes, it will take really long to stop making them, possibly forever.

However, when you play live, if you make a mistake, you will want to play through it. If you take the habit of stopping whenever you make a mistake, that might be more difficult to do. I guess practicing playing through mistakes is not bad also. But, what you really want to do, is isolate what's tough, and practice it until it is easy. If you just make mistakes and play through, you're not really doing that. You will get more flexible, and get more powerful from playing over and over like that, but it will be more slow, and some things will linger forever.
#5
I also take approximately 15 minutes to 30 minutes to get warm and get my coordination on track. This isn't uncommon.

I think your fingers getting weary is either a sign of uneconomical playing or simply lack of strength (which will come with time and practice).

If you want to do warm-up exercises for playing longer, you should do varied stuff, so that you don't exhaust a specific muscle right off the bat.

I recommend that you don't practice when you know you're making many mistakes. If you do, you'll start forgiving your own mistakes and get used to them. In the end, you won't mind that they're there (speaking from personal regrets). Play it slower instead, and focus on using only the muscles you need.
#6
Quote by MyOceanToSwim
I've been back playing guitar for maybe 1 months been playing mostly in excess of two hours a day sadly very stop start and not very targeted though anyway.

I notice for more or less the 30 minutes I am crap at lead or solo stuff...I need a warm up and a long one? I am very inaccurate and just garbage and stuff I was kind of playing last night?

It's mostly the fast stuff right on on my technique. I also notice this in Master of Puppets as well riffs wise coming into those riffs cold I simply tense up and lose it...if I've been playing an hour though I can probably play it.

THEN comes the let down about 1.45 minutes or so my little finger becomes stiff and my ring finger becomes fatigued and more...inaccuracy occurs I generally just call it quits because

To push through and practice things with mistakes 30 minutes ago I was doing without mistakes feels pointless and frustrating.

My hands really don't have much stamina. Any tips for warming up faster and I guess playing longer?

Just a few comments I want to put out there.

You have only been playing a month.That is a very small amount of time especially for doing lead and solos.You are taking on too much too quickly.Everybody is different and certain thing come more natural to others than it will to you and vice versa.

My second point is learning stuff like master of puppets is quite lets say intermediate and a bit difficult due to speed and technique.I think your aiming too high too quick.

Slow down a bit maybe your pushing it too much and that's why your are tiring out.
#7
"warming up" is really just giving your muscle memory time to "remember" how to play economically. and when you're a beginner, this "remembering" is more like "figuring out all over again." as you get better, you won't need to warm up for so long.

obviously though, some passages will be more tiring to play than others, so there is some stamina-building involved.
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#8
Quote by smittyanthrax
Just a few comments I want to put out there.

You have only been playing a month.



.... I uh, somehow missed that lol.

My answer in that case is different. Don't hurt yourself, aim for burn in your forearms. It's probably not warming up your issue, but just you actually getting better while you're sitting there practicing. You may regress a little, I don't remember that really being an issue, but you never know I guess.

Guitar was one of those things that taught me warming up, and being warm is not some sort of myth where people are just picky for nothing, but is something real. I never really noticed until I got to a pretty high level though. I always had some good days and some bad days, but warming up is a bit different. Once you get to speed you kind of lose precision if you are not warm. For slow stuff it's not so bad. I could play something slow right away no problem with no warmup. If I want to play something quick and agile, then I need to warmup.

For you, I think don't hurt yourself. You want burn in your forearms, and a little pain in your finger tips is ok, but you don't want to twist too much or get too much pain in your hands kind of like your bones or joints or anything. Take small steps.

Some pain is alright, you want to work hard and push. But you don't want injury.

Playing what you want to play at speed sounds to me a little ambitious and dangerous for your first month. You might learn the fingering, but in order to get the timing and speed correctly, you will have a long way to go.
#9
Quote by vIsIbleNoIsE
"warming up" is really just giving your muscle memory time to "remember" how to play economically.


I don't think it is. Have you ever tried to play with cold hands? It's virtually impossible.

The human body is kind of kind of like a race car. It is designed to work optimally when it is hot. When you're sitting around relaxing your life does not depend on the performance of your body. When you're being chased by something big that wants to eat you, you'll want to be firing on all cylinders, and getting the most you possibly can out of your body.

It's actually the heat of the actually body, or the muscles. it has sort of a lubricating effect also, like everything gets loose and controllable. The extreme is cold hands, where your hands become useless, but standard room temperature is not their best. They can be even better than that, when they are warmed up.

But you won't really notice that with your hands, unless you are doing more tricky things. Just like you won't notice you are not warmed up when you're just walking around. But you go from cold and try to do something very athletic, it will be more difficult than after you are warmed up.
#10
It's healthy to do an actual warm up session before you go to music that requires chops.

Spend 15-45 minutes on basic technique and musical rudiments like picking, hammer/pull, scales, arpeggios, fingerpicking patterns, etc.

Then take a 15 minute break and spend 30-60 minutes on music.

Then another break, then another music session.

It's important to give your hands rest to avoid fatigue and injury, as well as to let your mind rest so you can maintain focus. And as your technique improves you will become fatigued less easily.

Further, doing thorough warm ups will help establish a foundation of technique. Your warmups are the things you can do with cold hands. When you play in bands and on stage, you don't always have time to get nice and loose, so it's important that you can play decently no matter what.
Last edited by cdgraves at Sep 3, 2015,
#11
Hi there,


i think the most important thing to pay attention to while doing your warm-up is to FULLY engage your mind!


Let me explain that to you:
Whenever  you start to warm up you need to get your fingers warm and smooth to  play more accurate and faster. That is the part most players understand.


But your Bain also needs to get engaged and here is why:
If  you don't engage your brain during the warm up you will "loose" a lot  of precious practise time (YES you will loose the time to improve as a  player, because playing a scale mindless up and down has absolutely NO  benefit for your guitar playing!)
So  you will actually improve your guitar skills during the warm up and  therefore make your guitar routine much more efficient when you start to  engage your mind.


How should you do that?
It actually doesn't matter what you are playing as long as it is challanging for your BRAIN.
For example play a scale you know but play a sequence of thirds instead of simply play the scale up and down.

Once  you are getting familiar with that adopt the idea to another scale or  simply change the pattern. There are endlesspossibilitys to that.

You will also get more creative and it is a lot of fun - right away even in the warm up


Cheers,
Matthias