#1
Wow, haven't posted in a while.

Anyways, I'm on the market for a new guitar in which I'm going to put Seymour Duncan Blackouts. The thing is, I'd like a guitar that accentuates the higher frequency range (blackouts are very much mid-oriented). In other words, a guitar that has a combination of wood/neck specs etc. that makes it sound bright.

No Les Paul-type guitars, and definitely no floyd rose please. Also, at least one of the cavities should be large enough to accommodate a battery (so, for instance, Ibanez S guitars are out of the question, possibly also fender strats (?) ).

Budget is somewhere in the vicinity of 500 euros (and whatever that is in dollars).

Suggestions?
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#2
I won't get into specific guitars much, Strats and Telecasters both have a reputation for pretty bright sound. Anything with a single coil is likely to be a little brighter than humbuckers. Not a lot, but a bit brighter, which is why strats and teles tend to be brighter in general. The large metal plate bridge of a tele helps too.

You can also adjust the pickups of any guitar to get more treble by pulling the treble end of the pickup closer to the strings and moving the bass side further away. I usually do that with the neck pickups of most of my guitars, and lower the treble side of the bridge pickups if they tend to be too bright.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#3
Fretboard wood would probably have an influence there, but I forget which one is brightest, maple, rosewood, ebony.
#4
It seems all the wrong way around to me. - The guitar is just a lump of wood, tone wood effect is IMO absolutely minimal, if you can dteect it at all. The pickups dominate the guitar end of the amplification chain, so you choose them for the tone you want. For example, SD Jazz are the brightest humbuckers that SD make, so find any HH guitar that you like in your budget and stick a set of SD Jazz or similar in it. Gretsch style low-output humbuckers are also bright and airy, eg GFS Memphis.

You can then add series/single/parallel switching for added versatility, and the trem spring cavity will accommodate a battery if you don't want to use the trem - I've done that to install active tone controls.
#5
Quote by Tony Done
It seems all the wrong way around to me. - The guitar is just a lump of wood, tone wood effect is IMO absolutely minimal, if you can dteect it at all...


Ugh..another one of these guys.

The wood absolutely makes a difference in how a guitar sounds. I have a 2 rgs, one with basswood/maple the other with mahogany/rosewood....same pickups. The basswood is a much brighter tone, and the mahogany is more bassy and much more sustain.

I'm not sure if people like this have ever had many guitars or they have just been told this myth. If wood didn't matter, then why wouldn't they just make les pauls and strats out of basswood? They would be much cheaper if they were. Also they would use much lower grade woods if it didn't matter. Maybe some people don't care and can cover it all up with effects and such, but most people that have played a long time can tell.


Now, getting back to the original posters question. MAPLE fretboards are going to give you a brighter/snappier tone. Think Tele's. Those are the masters of the snappy, country, twangy tone.

Body woods such as maple and alder are brighter sounding than mahogany. Here's a link to body wood types and explanations:
http://www.warmoth.com/Guitar/Bodies/Options/BodyWoodOptions.aspx
#6
Quote by pressureproject
Ugh..another one of these guys.

The wood absolutely makes a difference in how a guitar sounds. I have a 2 rgs, one with basswood/maple the other with mahogany/rosewood....same pickups. The basswood is a much brighter tone, and the mahogany is more bassy and much more sustain.

I'm not sure if people like this have ever had many guitars or they have just been told this myth. If wood didn't matter, then why wouldn't they just make les pauls and strats out of basswood? They would be much cheaper if they were. Also they would use much lower grade woods if it didn't matter. Maybe some people don't care and can cover it all up with effects and such, but most people that have played a long time can tell.


Now, getting back to the original posters question. MAPLE fretboards are going to give you a brighter/snappier tone. Think Tele's. Those are the masters of the snappy, country, twangy tone.

Body woods such as maple and alder are brighter sounding than mahogany. Here's a link to body wood types and explanations:
http://www.warmoth.com/Guitar/Bodies/Options/BodyWoodOptions.aspx


uugh... anothe one of these guys . there has been no definitive proof about how much wood effects the tone of electric guitars. i have a neck through guitar that features a maple neck with an ebony fretboard. acording to you it should be very bright but suprise it's not. i use it in place of a LP as it has those types of tones.

seems to me that if you want to use mid heavy pickups then that is what you are going to get. i kinda doubt that a "bright" sounding guitar will change that much. now a bright amp might do more for you but i guess that is another debate.
#8
Quote by Tony Done


I've actually argued on the "for" side more than the "against", but not in the context of this thread.


so have i but agree in this case it won't be as much of a factor as OP thinks. i had a maple body and neck strat years ago and it was no more bright than any other strat i played. wood seems to be a factor but not a be all end all one.
#9
Quote by monwobobbo
so have i but agree in this case it won't be as much of a factor as OP thinks. i had a maple body and neck strat years ago and it was no more bright than any other strat i played. wood seems to be a factor but not a be all end all one.


My guild sounds very LP like nice fat tone with lots of sustain. The my Jackson sounds pretty much like a start. The Ibanez has a very chunky sound but not nearly as much sustain as the guild (most likely from cheap ass locking trem)

OP you want a brighter sound get a start and don't put black outs in it. They are mid heavy and will never produce a bight tone.
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Quote by FatalGear41

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#10
Look for a godin redline 2*. Very bright tone, excellent build quality. They're loaded with 81/85 so there's already a cavity for the battery. It is clearly the brightest guitar i've owned, even a bit too much for me.
#11
Whether or not wood makes a difference in the tone of electric guitars is a matter of contention. What is not is whether pickups make a difference. From this, I deduce that the pickups on an electric guitar make a bigger tonal impact than wood.

Therefore, I have to agree with Tony's statement:
It seems all the wrong way around to me


Find a set of pickups that has the tonal characteristics you seek...if you're lucky, they're on a production guitar.
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#12
Quote by pressureproject
Ugh..another one of these guys.

The wood absolutely makes a difference in how a guitar sounds. I have a 2 rgs, one with basswood/maple the other with mahogany/rosewood....same pickups. The basswood is a much brighter tone, and the mahogany is more bassy and much more sustain.

I'm not sure if people like this have ever had many guitars or they have just been told this myth. If wood didn't matter, then why wouldn't they just make les pauls and strats out of basswood? They would be much cheaper if they were. Also they would use much lower grade woods if it didn't matter. Maybe some people don't care and can cover it all up with effects and such, but most people that have played a long time can tell.


I have just over 50 guitars. And I've been at this quite a while. I really wish I could agree with you that there's a repeatable difference between woods, but in my experience, while the wood MAY make a difference in how a guitar sounds, it's not repeatable or predictable.

And oh, by the way, they DO make Les Pauls and strats out of other woods and it doesn't seem to matter to most folks. They drill them out, chamber them, fill them with balsa, sandwich them, put mahogany necks on them, put maple necks on them, etc., and still the fanboi faithful insist that they all sound like ByGod Les Pauls.

I have a Carvin V220, a solid maple (body and neck) guitar in one of those star shapes. Sounds like a Les Paul. I have two DC-150s, which are small-bodied double cutaway neck-through guitars, one with a koa body/neck with a maple cap, ebony fretboard, abalone inlays, the other solid maple body/neck, ebony fretboard, dot inlays. I'm not sure what you THINK they would sound like according to the wood bible. But I'll guarantee you they don't. I have three Moonstones. One is a Vulcan set-neck from the mid-70's, one of just 35 that were built to be sold under the Morley label at $1850 (in the mid '70's, when an LP Standard was $500). The body is a single chunk of maple burl and weighs a ton. The neck is a gorgeous multipiece thing of maple and...I dunno, purpleheart? Ebony fretboard, abalone inlays, Bartolini active pickups with two different active treble boosts and a Varitone-style tone selector (as well as 2V, 2T plus a master volume). I guarantee you can't pick that guitar out if you're blindfolded. Another Moonstone is a neck-through construction (multipiece figured maple) with a Brazilian Rosewood fretboard, a Flying V shape with "wings" made of a large core of mahogany with maple burl caps front and back. The trem is solid brass. You want to take a stab at what THAT sounds like, based on the woods? Another has a limba body and neck with a spalted/burled maple cap, ebony fretboard. Wanna take a guess on that one?

I have Carvin DC-style superstrat-ish guitars in solid mahogany, solid koa, mahogany with a quilted maple cap and in alder (or poplar, I've forgotten) with a maple neck. All are neck-through. Oh and one's a 25.5" while the others are, variously, 24.75" and 25", all with ebony fretboards. I'll play 'em, you guess the woods.

And finally, I have three old LPs in mahogany with P90's (one has a Charlie Christian, two have bar-post pickups in the neck position) that are otherwise identical, except for the year they were manufactured. I'll play all three on that bridge P90 and I'll guarantee you can tell them apart blindfolded, but all three are the same (it says here) wood.

I have a superstrat with a three-piece maple neck (neck-through construction) and elm (yup, elm -- think swamp ash) body sides. Care to predict what THAT's going to sound like?

In *my* experience, while there are certainly differences between guitars and while I'll acknowledge that wood might have some influence over the sound of a solid body guitar, I don't think it's predictable or consistent, nor is it particularly important.
#13
But here the questions isn't what do woods sound like but a more specific, what guitar components does the TS need to get a bright sound with Blackout pickups. We can even set the Blackouts aside and ask, what specs would make for a bright sounding guitar.

In fact, for those of you who have connections, this would be a great question to ask the Carvin people, or the Jackson or ESP custom shop, and whoever else does custom orders. Just to see what they come up with. I doubt the answer would be "doesn't matter" but then again, who knows.
#14
Quote by dthmtl3

In fact, for those of you who have connections, this would be a great question to ask the Carvin people, or the Jackson or ESP custom shop, and whoever else does custom orders. Just to see what they come up with. I doubt the answer would be "doesn't matter" but then again, who knows.


Good question. I'm guessing that whoever's on the line taking the order this week will tell you what he's been told in orientation that he should say if the question comes up. It's like asking someone at Guitar Splinter what's best. A black shirt with a logo on it doesn't make you less of an idiot.
#15
Yeah whatever a guitar manufacturer has to say is going to be heavily biased. They have a vested interest in getting as much money from you as possible. For them to say that wood doesn't make very much tonal difference would damage the brand and its sales, even if it is true. Nothing they're going to say will be impartial.
Quote by TheSennaj
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Sep 5, 2015,
#16
Wow, that's a dim view of higher level guitar manufacturers. It can't possibly be that pointless as asking a GC kid a question. There's got to be some knowledgeable person in custom shops who can guide you when it comes to achieving the sound you want, and not every concern is going to be answered with the most expensive components--I would imagine. I mean these guys aren't lawyers or dentists. Perhaps the person reading the script on the screen won't know any better but someone there has got to know about this based on experience building or testing thousands of guitars.