#1
I live in the desert. Today it's 90 degrees and humidity is 26%. That humidity is high for the area, btw....it's cloudy today. I've never worried about humidity before but now that I have a couple guitars I really like I'd like to protect them from cracking. Found data that showed some of the bad things that happen if humidity gets too low. I need a humidifier...recommend a good one!

Found this on the net (http://www.premierguitar.com/articles/Fighting_the_Humidity_Battle):


Below 35 percent humidity:
• Action (string height) changes.
• The top flattens out.
• Fret ends feel a little sharp.

Below 25 percent humidity:
• Fret ends become very sharp.
• There are drastic changes in the playability.
• Seams begin to separate.
• There’s a slight separation between the bridge and top.
• The finish starts to sink.

Below 15 percent humidity:
• Cracks appear in the top and body (Fig. 1).
• The bridge and fretboard crack (Fig. 2).
• The glue joints in the neck, bridge, and braces begin to separate.
#2
First, keep in mind that the same air outside,. when cooled by the shade inside in the house, will have a higher relative humidity. (RH goes up as the temp drops).

But if you're running AC, all bets are off.

Speaking for my situation, I live on the stinking humid east coast. You can't afford to run the AC hard enough here to do any appreciable damage during the summer.

That said, Taylor packages those virtually same instructions / observations with every guitar they ship. It almost looks like plagiary.

We have our own humidity sticky here: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=987641

Your course of action is going to depend on, how many guitars you have, and how much space in your home can be tasked to the care and feeding of musical instruments. If you have a music room, get a small room size humidifier, and run it as needed. Otherwise individual case humidifiers might be called for..

Also bear in mind that bathroom activities, and boiling water for spaghetti contribute to interior humidity.

The biggest danger is during the winter, when cold low RH air is heated by the home, and heating that air, drops its RH precipitously. You might start out @ 30% RH in 30 degree air, then wind up with 10% RH in 70 degree air inside vthe home.

Those are guesses, but more than reasonable assumptions.
#4
You're quite welcome.

Your situation is rather dodgy though, and I would get on the humidity issue without delay.

Any hygrometer you buy will almost definitely need calibration. So, as Patti is wont to say, "give it the salt test". And as I, those before and after me had to do, you google "salt test". (Sorry, it's tradition).

What type of central heat, (if any), do you use? Some of them can be fitted directly with humidifiers. You might be one of the lucky ones. Of course, some of those OEM retrofits can be rather pricey. And we're back to a room humidifier and/ or case humidifier.

If it came to creating local humidity, during the winter I might consider a vaporizer in lieu of a humidifier. You get extra heat, and they don't go rank and musty like a humidifier. You really have to babysit room humidifiers to prevent them from spewing wet musty air around.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 6, 2015,
#5
Here is the floorplan for my home.

http://www.hakesbrothers.com/del-rey-new-home-plan-1439.php#plan

Central heat/refrigerated air. I just want to keep it very simple for now so I'm looking at something like this...

http://www.amazon.com/MA1201-Whole-House-Console-Style-Evaporative-Humidifier/dp/B004S34ISA/ref=sr_1_39?ie=UTF8&qid=1441551278&sr=8-39&keywords=humidifier

And stick it in my hallway, or perhaps in the great room. This will serve a dual purpose, it will help protect my guitars (hopefully), plus it will keep my jungle girl from getting dry skin. I like touching her skin as often as possible, lol.

There is no door between the master bedroom and the master bathroom, so presumably the humidity is higher than anywhere in the house (due to showering or bathing once a day putting moisture in the air). I have 6 guitars, 4 of which are acoustics. I noticed the strings broke on my classical guitar, which is what got me nervous about humidity, even though it's in the room next to the master bathroom.
#6
Quote by TobusRex
Here is the floorplan for my home.

http://www.hakesbrothers.com/del-rey-new-home-plan-1439.php#plan

Central heat/refrigerated air. I just want to keep it very simple for now so I'm looking at something like this...

http://www.amazon.com/MA1201-Whole-House-Console-Style-Evaporative-Humidifier/dp/B004S34ISA/ref=sr_1_39?ie=UTF8&qid=1441551278&sr=8-39&keywords=humidifier

And stick it in my hallway, or perhaps in the great room. This will serve a dual purpose, it will help protect my guitars (hopefully), plus it will keep my jungle girl from getting dry skin. I like touching her skin as often as possible, lol.
OK, I briefly considered posting a link to KY personal lubricants. But, I realized that would be in extremely bad taste, even by my quite minimal amoral standards.

Anyway, the humididdlyfier Looks good. Just make sure you buy a pumper truck full of this: http://www.amazon.com/Essick-Air-1970-Humidifier-Bacteriostatic/dp/B000VBLBUG/ref=pd_sim_201_2/182-3372222-5265254?ie=UTF8&refRID=148XFNMR452KXAB9HQT4 to go with it.

That stuff will get used up faster than a 55 gallon drum of amyl nitrate at an 80's disco.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 6, 2015,
#7
Quote by TobusRex
Here is the floorplan for my home. ...[ ]...
Very nice place BTW. I doubt if you could have a 28' square saltbox built around here for $150K.

If those prices included the lot, it would be almost scary.

The City of Philadelphia just released some of its properties to developers with the stipulation the homes to be built on them wouldn't exceed a $200.000. That's what we now call "low income housing" here in Philly. The whole price limit thing was to prevent carpet bagging developers big plans for "gentrification", forcing low income families out of our pitiable row houses.
#8
Quote by Captaincranky
Very nice place BTW. I doubt if you could have a 28' square saltbox built around here for $150K.

If those prices included the lot, it would be almost scary.

The City of Philadelphia just released some of its properties to developers with the stipulation the homes to be built on them wouldn't exceed a $200.000. That's what we now call "low income housing" here in Philly. The whole price limit thing was to prevent carpet bagging developers big plans for "gentrification", forcing low income families out of our pitiable row houses.


Thanks. I have no idea what you mean by "28' square saltbox" though. The price included the lot, but I put a lot more into the house than just that. $23,000 in solar panels with a solar eave that shades the living room windows. Also put in a $3,000 water softening system. Just a shade over $150,000 total (was cheaper a couple years ago).
#9
Quote by TobusRex
Thanks. I have no idea what you mean by "28' square saltbox" though.
Here's a basic New England "Salt Box":



The full length living room is on the low side of the roof. (Vaulted ceiling with a balcony in front of the upstairs bedrooms). Often these designs had a s full length living room window also.
#10
I like it. I dislike super high ceilings though. I'm assuming normal ceilings inside?

There is a builder down here that has a home model which, not BSing, has a ceiling about 20' high. A nightmare to change out lightbulbs!
#11
Quote by TobusRex
I like it. I dislike super high ceilings though. I'm assuming normal ceilings inside?

There is a builder down here that has a home model which, not BSing, has a ceiling about 20' high. A nightmare to change out lightbulbs!
Perhaps but, ceiling fans always look super cool hanging from those long down rods.

In the case of these houses, the living room ceiling does indeed go to the second story. But, you have a cantilevered balcony overhanging the LR, which allows access to the upstairs bedrooms.

And I couldn't find an interior shot, which would have helped my explanation greatly.

Here, this is way more extravagant, but it does show the balcony detail. (The perspective in the drawing is lousy though).


Although you do have to picture the balcony floating over the living room.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 24, 2015,