#1
Hiya,

To be honest, I haven't done anything remotely creative in the last few months. There's a lot going on in my personal life at the moment and it feels like most of my favourite music doesn't seem to inspire me right now, and while this sucks balls it has forced me to seek inspiration from places I haven't gone to before.

So, I have more or less fallen in love with classical piano music. I've been most interested in the impressionist movement, and Ravel and Debussy have quickly ascended through the ranks and have become some of my favourite composers. And I feel really inspired to write something with the piano that's more in the classical realm. However, I mostly have experience in popular music and jazz, so this is somewhat of a new frontier for me. I've had formal education in music theory, so I'm familiar with all of the basics, and I have studied some more advanced concepts as well. But the classical part is not what worries me here, I am at the moment studying voice leading, counterpoint and classical harmony in more depth, and as I said I'm not that uneducated at the subject. What worries me is the piano part.

In other words, I have near zero experience with the piano. I can play some really basic stuff, but it's not really the technical side that interests me here, it's the composition. I've seen multiple people, some even here on the forum, talk about piano composition in a way that leads me to believe that there are a lot of rules and technical aspects that one has to take into consideration in order to write fluidly. So, can anyone think of resources that could help me with understanding the piano better? I'm not terrible at analyzing compositions, so I'll definitely start dissecting some of my favourite piano works. But books etc. that handle the subject would be really useful. I'm also a bit lost on different classical forms, for example I have next to no idea what makes a sonata a sonata. So resources on that are also much appreciated.

And yes, I'm fully aware that a teacher is the absolute best way to go here. I'm working on that, and having a teacher doesn't stop me from learning on my own as well. I'd like to know about all of the resources that I can utilize here.

TL;DR: I'm a guitarist who has some experience in classical composition but almost no experience with the piano, who'd like to compose classical piano music. I'm looking for books or other resources to help with this. You don't have to mention a teacher, I'm aware of the importance. I'm most interested in impressionism and romanticism.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#2
Examine music scores or pieces, play them, examine what you find interesting and draw the interesting stuff out. Being hard of improvisation, this has been my saving grace.

Then again, I started off with piano and then went to guitar. It's a really different mindset.
#3
Yeah, I guess that's always the best thing to do, study music with music. I don't have a piano right now, but I should have daily, permanent access to one in a few months thanks to my to-be roommate. It'd be cool to learn how to actually play it as well, even though I still have ways to go with the guitar.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#4
If you don't know how to play it the only way to learn to write for it is to write and then get someone who can play to look at it. They'll be able to show you what's difficult and what's unnecessarily awkward in what you wrote. Piano is a difficult instrument to write well for so you really need to spend some time with a good player.
#5
Piano is a fish instrument. By that I mean you have to keep playing notes or else you will die... assuming you don't die from boredom first.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#6
^That strangely makes sense, Kristen. In a way.

And sure, I'll be sharing an apartment with a pianist soon, hence why I get to play it so often. I hear you about it being difficult, that's why I even bother asking for tips.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#7
Compare to an organ, which is not a fish instrument since it can sustain forever.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.