#1
Hi all,

I have this annual gig with a brass band, where I must rely on my guitar amp as self monitoring. The volume get really, really load at times, especially when the tubas right next to me kick in on the loud parts. In the past I've just barely gotten by with my Marshall VS265, but even that amp has given me a little to low headroom.

I could go for a bigger amp, like a 100-watt'er, but since I mostly play at home it's really overkill for me 99,9% of the time. A far better solution would be to buy a smaller amp (say 40 watt) and find some way to use it and still be able to hear myself at the annual gig.

Is there any way to use a 40 watt'er in scenarios that call for at least 70 watt of power? Micking up the amp and bringing my own stage monitor would be a possible way to go, but I'm hoping there's some other way.


Kenneth
#2
wattage isn't really linear, and isn't the only thing affecting volume.

a lot of people would say that, while a watt is a watt, tube amps tend to cut through better and sound louder. also some speakers are more efficient than others so will sound louder at the same wattage rating.

granted, neither of those things will help with your home playing (it doesn't really matter what the wattage is, it'll still be too loud), but i'm just pointing out that just because the valvestate at 65 watts wasn't loud enough doesn't mean that you should only look at 70W+ amps.
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#3
Quote by kenneho
Hi all,

I have this annual gig with a brass band, where I must rely on my guitar amp as self monitoring. The volume get really, really load at times, especially when the tubas right next to me kick in on the loud parts. In the past I've just barely gotten by with my Marshall VS265, but even that amp has given me a little to low headroom.

I could go for a bigger amp, like a 100-watt'er, but since I mostly play at home it's really overkill for me 99,9% of the time. A far better solution would be to buy a smaller amp (say 40 watt) and find some way to use it and still be able to hear myself at the annual gig.

Is there any way to use a 40 watt'er in scenarios that call for at least 70 watt of power? Micking up the amp and bringing my own stage monitor would be a possible way to go, but I'm hoping there's some other way.




I have a similar gig. I have two amps that work well with this. One is the Carvin Belair (50W, EL84s, two Vintage 30 speakers, open back), which is fairly lightweight (around 50 lbs), quite compact (26" x 18" x 10") and VERY loud. And I have a 100W 1x12 combo Carvin XV112 from the late '80's. EL34s, one EV-L speaker (as currently configured), extremely loud and actually a bit heavier than the Belair, but still pretty compact.

Bits of advice (and, since it's free, worth every penny):

Put your amp up on an amp stand. I use one of these (OnStage RS700):



Cheap, stable, folds flat for transport, and your audience gets to hear your amp (as do you).
#5
Quote by flexiblemile
it would really help to know what kind of music you play and where you live etc.


The band has more than one TUBA in it.
Make a guess about the music.

My guess: It's a big band/jazz situation, he's going to be playing with an Ibanez AR420, he's in the US somewhere.
Last edited by dspellman at Sep 6, 2015,
#6
Any decent tube amp. Put it in an amp stand 3' away pointing at your head. Done.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Sep 6, 2015,
#7
If you only do this once a year just rent a Fender or a Roland Jazz Chorus.
#9
Quote by kenneho
Micking up the amp and bringing my own stage monitor would be a possible way to go, but I'm hoping there's some other way.
That is the best way to do it and the only way to do it properly really, unless you're playing in a small place for 30 or so people.

Find yourself a half decent PA system.
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#10
i am not a fan of valvestates. so i would look at this as an excuse to get a new amp. (haha)

...BUT an amp stand (as mentioned) will make a HUGE difference. that is probably more important.
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#11
yeah renting work?

but amp stand. is putting a new speaker in an option? such as a eminence wizard? they are LOUD speakers. something with a sensitivity reading over 100 SPL will make a noticable difference.
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#12
i can't speak from my experience, but i have heard a lot over time that eminence is a little over enthusiastic with their sensitivity ratings.

i personally wouldn't bother to stick a speaker in a valvestate, i would just put that money into a new amp.
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#13
Oh hell yes, dump the Valvestate post haste.
I'm thinking an AC30 might be the go in this situations - on one of those stands dspellman showed. And buy a trolley/dolly/handcart for it. They may be 30W but damn they is heavy.
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#14
I sold the Valvestate a while back, so luckily using that is not an alternative.

Renting an amp might be an possibility, but I'm concerned about showing up a at a gig with an amp I don't know well.

Bringing a small amp, a mick and a monitor (I've already got an Alto TS112A) might not be a very bad idea. Might look a bit wired to the other guys though - I at least haven't seen anyone show up with their own mick and monitor before.

Bringing a loud enough tube amp seems like the easiest solution - just show up a the gig, plugin in the guitar, and I'm good to go. I do like this option over the other ones. Problem is how to find an amp that's loud enough. Going for a 40 watt'er, and at the gig finding that it's not loud enought, would be really bad.
#16
Jazz I'm thinking Fender - Plenty of clean head room. However, without big money you might not get the wattage you need so why not use 2. Buy one and hire a second.
Please note: The above comments are based on my experience, and may represent my perception of that experience. This may not be accurate and, subject to the style of music you play, may be irrelevant or wrong.
#17
Quote by kenneho


Bringing a loud enough tube amp seems like the easiest solution - just show up a the gig, plugin in the guitar, and I'm good to go. I do like this option over the other ones. Problem is how to find an amp that's loud enough. Going for a 40 watt'er, and at the gig finding that it's not loud enought, would be really bad.


Might want to re-read my post. That Belair (with vintage 30's) is seriously loud. 50W.
#18
I agree with the idea of the amp stand. I have the one pictured above. I use it whenever I can (sometimes there is not enough room for it). An map stand puts the amp at an angle where you can hear it much better. A cheaper investment than buying a new amp (unless you just want a new amp). Your amp is big enough but I imagine it's on the floor and aimed at your knees. The amp stand aims it at your ears.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at Sep 10, 2015,
#19
Quote by kenneho
I sold the Valvestate a while back, so luckily using that is not an alternative.

Renting an amp might be an possibility, but I'm concerned about showing up a at a gig with an amp I don't know well.

Bringing a small amp, a mick and a monitor (I've already got an Alto TS112A) might not be a very bad idea. Might look a bit wired to the other guys though - I at least haven't seen anyone show up with their own mick and monitor before.

Bringing a loud enough tube amp seems like the easiest solution - just show up a the gig, plugin in the guitar, and I'm good to go. I do like this option over the other ones. Problem is how to find an amp that's loud enough. Going for a 40 watt'er, and at the gig finding that it's not loud enought, would be really bad.


If 40w from a good amp with good speakers isn't enough, nothing is and it's time to mic it up...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#20
Quote by dspellman
Might want to re-read my post. That Belair (with vintage 30's) is seriously loud. 50W.


Ah, thanks, I must have missed that part of your original post. The Belair seems like a very good candidate. I just googled it, and from what I've read it got a really excellent clean sound (maybe comparable to Fender?). How would the output volume compare to the Marshall VS265 - is it louder even though the Marshall is 65 watt? And will the clean channel break long before max volume, or will it stay clean even at close to max volume?
#21
Quote by kenneho
Ah, thanks, I must have missed that part of your original post. The Belair seems like a very good candidate. I just googled it, and from what I've read it got a really excellent clean sound (maybe comparable to Fender?). How would the output volume compare to the Marshall VS265 - is it louder even though the Marshall is 65 watt? And will the clean channel break long before max volume, or will it stay clean even at close to max volume?


Okay, here's the deal. The clean channel will stay clean pretty much all the way up; there's a lot of negative feedback built into the amp. And yes, it's louder than the Marshall 65 watt if you have the pair of V30's in it. Other speakers (with other sensitivity) I can't speak for.

Fact is, mine's been modified. The unmodified amp and the modified amp have the same volume, clean-wise, but one of the additions is a pot that will allow you to dial the negative feedback from the stock amount (clean way up through LOUD) down to zero (which will give you some "hair" when you dig in, even on the clean channel). Amps designed more for the gain crowd will lean toward the zero side of that dial, but the Belair in stock form isn't that, leastways in the clean channel.
#22
Quote by dspellman
Okay, here's the deal. The clean channel will stay clean pretty much all the way up; there's a lot of negative feedback built into the amp. And yes, it's louder than the Marshall 65 watt if you have the pair of V30's in it. Other speakers (with other sensitivity) I can't speak for.

Fact is, mine's been modified. The unmodified amp and the modified amp have the same volume, clean-wise, but one of the additions is a pot that will allow you to dial the negative feedback from the stock amount (clean way up through LOUD) down to zero (which will give you some "hair" when you dig in, even on the clean channel). Amps designed more for the gain crowd will lean toward the zero side of that dial, but the Belair in stock form isn't that, leastways in the clean channel.


Good to hear it will stay clean pretty much all the way up. My Marshall 65 watt used to break up when I used it on the big band I mentioned, and playing jazz through a amp that breaks up isn't all that fun.

I'm not quite sure what negative feedback is, but will read up on the subject if I go for the Belair.