#2
I think you might be "fretting out." Basically as you bend, the string just barely contacts one of the frets further up the neck and it keeps it from ringing out.
#3
You've got a high fret. The 16th fret is contacting the string as you bend up on the 15th, causing it to mute as you bend it. It's a very common problem on cheap guitars. Nor is it a problem you can solve yourself without some special tools.

Take the guitar to a tech and ask for a quote.
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#4
Oh no, money ain't a strong point. The guitar was only $300 new with a P90 wouldn't be spending more than 80 or so.

If i have a part where I have to bend 15 if I just play 16 three times instead that will kind of work? Half a step up the bend is half a step...

Would the action have to be adjusted...as it's low atm...which is uh just the way I like it...it's so weird how it doesn't happen on ANY other frets waaa now I am sad
Last edited by MyOceanToSwim at Sep 7, 2015,
#5
Quote by MyOceanToSwim
Oh no, money ain't a strong point. The guitar was only $300 new with a P90 wouldn't be spending more than 80 or so.

If i have a part where I have to bend 15 if I just play 16 three times instead that will kind of work? Half a step up the bend is half a step...

Would the action have to be adjusted...as it's low atm...which is uh just the way I like it...it's so weird how it doesn't happen on ANY other frets waaa now I am sad


if you're lucky it just needs the one fret ground down a bit and leveled. it could be an issue with the board itself but not likely. if the frets are dressed correctly then you can keep the action as is . if not then raising it will help a little. sorry
#6
You can try adjusted the truss rod counter clockwise just a hair, allowing more bend in the neck.

You get problems on this like cheap guitars. High frets, bowed necks, bad setup. Just something you'll have to deal with. We've all been there.
#7
Does the problem occur across all the strings on the same fret or is it just on that one string? The high fret sounds likely and shouldn't be very expensive to fix.
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#8
Quote by Somekid94
I think you might be "fretting out." Basically as you bend, the string just barely contacts one of the frets further up the neck and it keeps it from ringing out.

I would guess this.

Three things you could do: raise the action a little and see if the problem goes away. If that doesn't work, adjust the truss rod to give your neck more bow. If that still doesn't work, you will need to take it to a tech to have some fret work done.

Hopefully you can fix it yourself by adjusting the action or truss rod, because techs charge about $10 USD per fret in my area. Unless you have just the one fret that is messed up, most of the time you have to do at least 6 or 7 frets so that all the frets around the problem area are level with each other.
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Last edited by *kill'emall* at Sep 7, 2015,
#9
adjusting the truss rod isn't going to make the problem go away. The truss rod only really has an effect on neck curvature up to the 10th or 11th fret or so, because the neck becomes more or less flat after that (or it should be).

This is going to be something you will most definitely need to take to a tech to fix, unless you're happy with simply raising the guitar's action until the problem goes away. But I personally don't like to do that.
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#10
I took it to two guitar techs


1. Bent neck two high frets, bowed neck basically action could be lower this that the other
$145 (We pay more for things in this country)

Heavily learning towards not doing that and saving up for my dream guitar which is $779

2. Guitar tech two all my strings are on wrong. Will restring and file down the fret for $30...took that option makes it more playable.


I actually start saving for a decent guitar as of now...I have a decent valve amp and been playing in excess of 2 hours a day so it's time for a decent guitar.

I ONLY LIKE one pick up guitars though so this narrows it down

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/161808062103?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&fromMakeTrack=true
#11
The $145 dollar option sounds like a better fix to me - if the 2nd guy only files one fret, it could send it out in other places on the neck.

Although $145 is more expensive in tbhe first place, that option will probably be cheaper in the long run if the $30 guy makes a mistake then you'll either need to get it looked at by another tech again or buy a new guitar.

I took my partscaster build to a tech to fix some neck issues I had - there were high frets all over the place so it had a full fret dress, neck shim and set up and it cost me £100 (assuming you are talking in USD that's $153) but the guitar plays great now and it hardly goes out of tune.
#12
That first guy who is charging $145 is on meth. That's half the value of the guitar itself and all he needs to do is file down 2 bloody frets. Big deal. The second guy charging $30 is a lot more in the ballpark of how much I'd expect it to cost.

If the guy doesn't level the high fret to the amount you need, you can always send the guitar back to him and ask to have it filed again at no extra cost. If he's the slightest bit reasonable, he'll do it.

If you're planning on buying a new guitar soon, why do you only want the guitar to have 1 pickup? Only having 1 pickup offers no real advantage and it needless limits the range of tones you can get from the guitar.
Quote by WeZ-84 at #33586439
The $145 dollar option sounds like a better fix to me - if the 2nd guy only files one fret, it could send it out in other places on the neck.

The way spot levelling a neck works makes this unlikely to happen.

The way spot levelling works is placing a dead straight edge over the suspect fret and trying to rock the straight edge about the adjacent frets. And then gently file down the area where the fret is causing the straight edge to rock, then check the work with the straight edge again, file again, repeat ad nauseum until the straight edge sits dead flat across the 3 frets. Then re-crown the fret that's been filed to restore its shape. There's nothing in that procedure that requires adjusting the height of the adjacent frets at all.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Sep 8, 2015,
#13
Quote by *kill'emall*

Three things you could do: raise the action a little and see if the problem goes away. If that doesn't work, adjust the truss rod to give your neck more bow. If that still doesn't work, you will need to take it to a tech to have some fret work done.


Those are two of the things I wouldn't do. First, your truss rod doesn't go up that far or affect those frets. You're just raising the action on the rest of the guitar like that. Ditto for raising the bridge. Very often a good tech can simply lower that one fret (assuming the rest are level) and get you going.

TOODEEPBLUE is on the money here.
Last edited by dspellman at Sep 8, 2015,
#14
Quote by MyOceanToSwim


Heavily learning towards not doing that and saving up for my dream guitar which is $779


Here's some sad information.

It's entirely possible that your dream guitar will also have a fret or two out of whack.
I famously (well, famously among my friends) bought a brand new ~$4000 Gibson Custom Shop Axcess Custom (Axcess's's's don't normally come in "custom" versions, and this one has all the ebony f/b, MOP blocks, big diamond headstock, yada yada), which was shipped directly from the Gibson Custom shop.

As I played it, I realized that it had the dreaded Gibson Hump (raised area of frets above the 16th fret). It went to Gary Brawer in San Francisco for a fret superglue and a run on his PLEK machine. It's been perfect ever since.

Shortly after that, I bought an under-$200 B-stock Agile (finish issues). It fretted out on a two-stop bend above the 16th fret (sound familiar?). It *also* went up to Gary's PLEK machine. And it, too, has played perfectly since then. It's not cheap to get a PLEK job done (In the neighborhood of $200), and for the cheap guitar, it was more than the guitar was worth.

One of my friends laughingly justified it by grouping the two guitars together and calling it an average expenditure of $200 for each of two guitars that, together, averaged $2000.

I've had a number of other guitars PLEK'd since then, and will do more. When I get a guitar that's new to me, I'll have a "Really Good Initial Setup" done on it, and that usually involves getting the frets superglued (prevents popup frets and "dead" frets), and any other fretwork done required to get them in perfect condition. Sometimes that's a PLEK run. I'll usually take one of my other guitars along and do two at once. Since I play what I buy (I don't "flip" guitars), I really don't factor in the initial cost of the guitar when planning setup and repairs.

Of the guitars I've purchased recently, several have surprised me with the quality of their fretwork. One is an original L6S ('70's) that had evidently lain under a bed for most of its life. Perfect shape. Carvins come from the factory with amazing fretwork, and given that several of those that I own are from the late '80's and early '90's and are STILL perfect, you've gotta wonder what they do in that factory. And finally, two Variax JTV89F guitars I've purchased over the last two years have had great fretwork and build quality. Well, with one exception. One guitar came with the guitar model and alternate tuning knobs swapped. Some kidders, those South Koreans. Probably the last one, done on Friday, just before 끝내기 시간. 24 frets, 16" radius, jumbo frets, low action, Graphtech LB63 Floyd and spot on fretwork. Whoda thunk?
#15
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
That first guy who is charging $145 is on meth.


He probably is as it's a bit of an issue down here at the moment.
The thing you probably don't realise is how expensive things are down here. I call it the aussie tax and was amazed at how cheap things were in the UK last time I went back.
On a whole wages are higher though, so you have to live and work here to fully appreciate the cost of things.
#16
Quote by SpiderM at #33587633

The thing you probably don't realise is how expensive things are down here.

Oh, I know.

But why pay $145 to get the same job done as someone who is charging 30?
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#17
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Oh, I know.

But why pay $145 to get the same job done as someone who is charging 30?


I didn't realise they were for the same work........too much meth
#18
Just bend that bend elsewhere. Problem solved, and it cost your broke-ass nothing.
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#19
It's back...The $30 option and we start saving, that said I can bend notes fully on the 15th fret now that's fixed...Yeah it's epiphone piece of absolute junk it's go a 9-90 fat cat in it though which is it's saving grace.