#1
Hi guys,

I've been playing for not too long now (probably 3 months) and I am really trying to bump up my practicing and become a formidable musician on the guitar, but to be honest there is so much information out there that I really feel overwhelmed. I am working on memorizing the entire fretboard and applying the A minor/ A major pentatonic in every position, but I'm really not sure what else to do. What do you guys feel are the first few things one should learn in order to really begin progressing? A few of the foundations of guitar progress, if you will, e.g "learn the minor pentatonic in every key" or some other form of creating a foundation to build off of. Any tips would be greatly appreciated!
#2
Start by learning your favorite songs. Just learn as much new songs as you can (that doesn't mean you shouldn't learn them properly and with time though) and the technical side of things is going to take care of itself. For example, if none of your favorite songs and guitarists use sweep picking, you probably shouldn't learn sweep picking just yet. Play the stuff you enjoy, and when you hit a part that you can't play yet, practice it in more depth.

It's great that you're already learning the fretboard, learning the notes, their locations and their relations to each other is really important.

And there are two things you need to consider: a teacher and a band. I'd recommend getting both as soon as possible. Yes, a teacher costs money but it's worth it. And yes, your first band will probably suck, but it's worth it. And remember that being self taught is not "cool", you'll impress no one that way. There's no shame in getting a teacher, and it will help you more than anything else.

A little theory will not hurt either. Even if you have zero interest in music theory, learning a bit about intervals, scale and chord building, keys and chord progressions will only help. But take your time here, better to learn the basics properly than as much as you can sloppily.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#4
Learning scales is great but you need to know why you are learning them so some basic theory is a really good idea. Make sure you are also learning how to play chords and in different inversions up and down the neck. You should be able to play each major and minor chord in several locations on the neck. The marriage of chords and scales is the heart of being able to solo with confidence and not just follow scale patterns.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#6
yeah start with chords and rhythm playing. those are the building blocks of songs and what you will be playing most of the time. 3 months is really no time in so don't sweat it you've got a long ways to go so don't push yourself to hard.
#7
Quote by Tandaman23
Hi guys,

I've been playing for not too long now (probably 3 months) and I am really trying to bump up my practicing and become a formidable musician on the guitar, but to be honest there is so much information out there that I really feel overwhelmed....


Yes there IS a lot of information overload and noise. I would highly recommend you check out www.guitarprinciples.com. I followed some of the advice there for a time and it is VERY good advice. I have no affiliation with them, other than studying their materials quite a bit and working with it. I use it as a basis for my own teaching (along with my own personal twist on things).
#8
Quote by Tandaman23
Hi guys,

I've been playing for not too long now (probably 3 months) and I am really trying to bump up my practicing and become a formidable musician on the guitar, but to be honest there is so much information out there that I really feel overwhelmed. I am working on memorizing the entire fretboard and applying the A minor/ A major pentatonic in every position, but I'm really not sure what else to do. What do you guys feel are the first few things one should learn in order to really begin progressing? A few of the foundations of guitar progress, if you will, e.g "learn the minor pentatonic in every key" or some other form of creating a foundation to build off of. Any tips would be greatly appreciated!



At its absolute bare bones, music is combining pitches to make sounds at various points in time. That's it.

The effect of the combinations is what gives some chords a sense of stability, and some a sense of "Let's move on from here" (instability). Ditto melody played against a chord progression (or even a melody by itself). This is a truth that applies to every genre of Western music.

Underpinning this are intervals. (An interval is a sound produced by two pitches). They generate effects in the listener from "yeah, really nice", to "ouch". The rhythm used can counter or increase this effect.

For example, try playing

5 1 - - - - (from 6th to 1st strig) ... these two pitches are a semitone apart
6 2 - - - - ... ditto

Notice that while the shape above shifted right one fret (involving different pitches), the distance between these stayed the same ... the interval didn't change.

5 7 - - - - ... these are 7 semitones apart
6 8 - - - - ... ditto

Notice that while the shape above shifted right one fret (involving different pitches), the distance between these stayed the same ... the interval didn't change.

If you learn by pitch names, you are learning at least twelve times as much as you need to.

There are only a handful of intervals ... these same ones crop up everywhere. Learn their shapes on guitar ... that'll reinforce every scale and chord you ever have to remember. They'll help you invent your own chord vocings.

In a chord, several intervals are grouped together.
In a scale, ditto ... e.g. mnor pentatonic has intervals (1, b3, 4, 5. b7) ... these form various handshapes in relation to the "1" (e.g. with A min pentatonic, A is the "1". In C min pentatonic. C is the "1" ... but the handshapes don't change ... they just are used at different parts of the neck.

Learn their sounds, gradually. You can recognise these by ear.

Intervals are the words of music. Learn them, and you'll speed you're learning up hugely. For more detail, see ...

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/music_theory/drastically_cut_learning_time_with_intervals.html

followed by

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/drastically_reduce_learning_time_with_intervals_part_2.html

cheers. Jerry
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Sep 10, 2015,