#1
SO. I've been playing guitar since '08. When I was in school I could only play on the weekends or on vacation because I was a problem child and my parents took my guitar away when I was grounded so I got about 5 months out of every year to practice, regardless I got to about above average skill anyway. Now I am encountering a problem, after I moved out, I took guitar really seriously and cleaned up my technique, after two years of being on my own all the progress I made outside of my parent's house has gone away, I can barely play past 180 bpm(8th notes) anymore, and I can only do basic things like trill or sweep well (if I'm lucky) 2 days out of the week. My playing is getting really sporadically bad. I'll wake up some-days and its great, and then most its like I've only really been playing at a level that's a year-year and a half. My dexterity is literally a dice roll. Can anyone provide any input on this? It's getting extremely frustrating to have such sudden up's and down's in my playing.
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Last edited by syke5 at Sep 9, 2015,
#2
This does happen to me from time to time on a smaller scale (I exactly don't feel like my skills have suddenly disappeared, I just have bad days) and what usually helps is taking a break, and doing a proper warm up before really getting into the difficult stuff. Playing guitar everyday and forcing myself to progress usually eats up my motivation, which is why the break helps, and warming up properly makes sure that I'm at my best when getting back into it. Simply skipping warm up causes the kind of situation you mentioned for me sometimes, so I recommend not skipping proper warm up. I hope I gave you some insight on the matter, I can only speak from my own experience.
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#3
Quote by syke5
... Can anyone provide any input on this? It's getting extremely frustrating to have such sudden up's and down's in my playing.


First off you're trying to measure your playing in BPM. That's a bad attitude from the get go. Secondly, the good stuff you learn by whatever practice you do, never really goes away over time. Its sort of like riding a bike. Things are going on subconsciously even when you are not actually practicing or playing that help move you along. But, if you can't distinguish what the good things are vs what the bad things are in your practice, you may go off the path. That's where a good teacher can help.
#5
As mentioned above, using BPM as a grading scale of any sort is a negative way to assess your playing. That being said, what I'm hearing from your OP, basically, is that your playing is inconsistent. The only, and absolute only way, to rid yourself of inconsistency to a realistic degree (meaning that we all have bad completely natural days/periods in playing where we just have to roll with it) is to practice with intent. That means focused practice, not 'sorta practicing' while you watch TV or shoot the shit with friends/bandmates.

A teacher might also be useful. If you find a good one, he/she will be able to spot almost immediately what you're being inefficient with as far as technique goes, and what you're doing that's leaving your current practice unable to get you what you want from it.

But it's my opinion that your biggest issue, going by your OP, is that you're plagued by inconsistency, and the best medicine for that is consistent, focused practice.

Cheers and good luck.

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#6
Thank you for all of your replies, if this will help I will try to clarify, my actual finger strength and such dissapears with dexterity, and some days I'll sound really strong and on point, and then it will get shaky, its kinda hard to explain, but yes I'm going to start looking for a teacher because I think I have plateau'd regardless.
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I don't think that exhonerees should get a cash settlement, they should get a basket with lotions and fruit, with a card that says "sorry!" with a little doggy on it.

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*Shredding* BREAKER BREAKER, IVE GOT A DEAD HOOKER, OVER*Shredding*
#7
Quote by syke5
Thank you for all of your replies, if this will help I will try to clarify, my actual finger strength and such dissapears with dexterity, and some days I'll sound really strong and on point, and then it will get shaky, its kinda hard to explain


You might want to take a look at how you're holding your hand and wrist, and potentially even see a doctor. There are some physical conditions in those areas that can affect dexterity and finger strength like you're suggesting. These can be developed or worsened by poor playing technique.

A good teacher will be able to spot the technique/positioning issue, but if there's something else unrelated to that, a doc might be the way to go to get it checked up on.

“We’re built of contradictions, all of us. It’s those opposing forces that give us strength, like an arch, each block pressing the next. Give me a man whose parts are all aligned in agreement and I’ll show you madness. We walk a narrow path, insanity to each side. A man without contradictions to balance him will soon veer off.”



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#8
don't underestimate stress, sleep problems and general lifestyle too
i'd definitely see a doctor
#9
When you are having a day where playing leads or scales isn't going well and is frustrating you, move on to another area of playing like working on your chord inversions or just learning new chords period. Work on ear training and learning a new song (all of it, not just the solo) or some other part of playing. It sounds like you may be just getting frustrated with one single aspect of playing guitar and ignoring working on other parts.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at Sep 10, 2015,