#1
I ran across this place the other day that sells parts for Fender style guitars and I had a question maybe someone could answer. If you put together an entire guitar, do they assemble it for you or do you just get a big box with a bunch of stuff in it and it's up to you to put it all together and get it to work?
#2
Buy a box of parts, get a box of parts. No labor or instructions included.
#3
Not as hard as it sounds... i just put together my 7 string RG knock off. wasn't very hard. Having the right tools and resources makes it easier... a good soldering iron is a must and guitarelectronics.com is a great resource for wiring diagrams and misc parts. An electric sander and good paint are really the only other things you would need.
Last edited by Beakeroyeast at Sep 20, 2015,
#4
There can be all sorts of little problems.

Strings riding high on the nut, then you need to figure out where to find the right file or pay someone to correct that. Bridge adjustments can also turn into a one big hassle. If you have the time and enjoy building that's fine but be sure to add everything up carefully including setup if you don't really know how to do that.

You can easily end up paying the same amount or more (if bought from a store or used Fender on ebay) so be careful.
Last edited by Marrowoflife at Sep 20, 2015,
#5
Quote by Sunfist
I ran across this place the other day that sells parts for Fender style guitars and I had a question maybe someone could answer. If you put together an entire guitar, do they assemble it for you or do you just get a big box with a bunch of stuff in it and it's up to you to put it all together and get it to work?


Box of parts.

There are a whole lot of things involved in turning that box of stuff into a guitar beyond "screw it together and pat yourself on the back." Warmoth necks don't come with any fretwork done other than the frets pressed into the fretboard. You'll have to level, crown, polish, etc. yourself. You may find yourself tearing your hair out getting the neck angle right, etc.

One of the reasons Warmoth-sourced guitars have such low resale value is that the buyer has NO idea what kind of ham-fisted yahoo put the thing together, or whether his idea of a well-assembled guitar resembles that of an *actual* well-assembled, well-set-up guitar. it's routine to find all kinds of kludges involved, and second owners are often found standing next to their tech hearing, "I have no idea what this guy was thinking."

We've had at least one guy on here who did a gorgeous job of assembling and painting an SG-style guitar, and who appeared to ask about a "minor" issue he was having with intonation. Something about his 12th fret actually sounding like the 11th or 13th fret (I've forgotten). Turned out he'd mismatched the scale of the neck and the body of the guitar when he ordered (dunno if it was from Warmoth) and had no idea they wouldn't work together.

That's the kind of guitar that shows up on eBay with copy that reads, "Just needs to have an intonation issue sorted." Sorting that issue required a complete rebuild of the guitar.
#6
^ LOL wow
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#7
Yeah, dspellman's got the right idea. It's not just IKEA and a setup.
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I'm a moron tho apparently and everyone should listen to you oh wise pretentious one
#8
I have an RG7 that I got as a box of parts. Assembled entirely with my own two hands. Got the parts on a Friday and was playing, even after paint, on Sunday evening. They're never going to have a huge resale because they have no brand stamped onto them. What would have cost me $500+ I have now for half because I'm not afraid of a little work and research. Not to mention that it's completely 1 of a kind. If you're looking at building, you're probably not thinking of turning around and selling it. Do some research first and you'll be fine.

PS. There are cheaper places than Warmoth of equal quality. Guitarfetish.com is one that comes to mind.
#9
This thread is drifting OT, but you have to see modding and bitsa building as a not necessarily inexpensive way to get your dream guitar. - You pay for it in lack of resale value as well as in the initial outlay. If you also factor in your time, tools and all the mistakes you made in the past to get to a reasonable level of competence, it can look very expensive. It is a hobby for pleasure, but not profit or even cost saving. It's still my personal choice though.
#10
Quote by Beakeroyeast
PS. There are cheaper places than Warmoth of equal quality. Guitarfetish.com is one that comes to mind.

Nah, I think Warmoth is of better quality - and more options - but with the disadvantage that everything's consistently overpriced, whereas GFS' good stuff can be great value.

Either way, if you don't know what you're doing you're liable to waste whatever money you put in anyway.
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Youre officially uber shit now.

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3d9310rd is far more upset than i 

Quote by Bladez22
I'm a moron tho apparently and everyone should listen to you oh wise pretentious one
#11
I disagree with that entirely. When I got my first "kit guitar" I had legitimately no clue where to begin. The box of a hundred little parts plus a half a loom of loose wire and I had to figure it all out... I could have easily said screw it, taken it to someone to build it, wire it and finish it. Had someone told how I was going to screw it up or how hard it is, I probably would have. But there's literally thousands of resources on the interweb thing and you can use all of them. To the OP, if you've got the drive to do so... I say get with it and do it. Shop around for deals or bundle parts, take your time with it and don't let anything/anyone discourage you. It isn't that hard.
#12
it's honestly not that hard and if you do fuck it up you can just take it apart and have a shop build it for you.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#13
Note that I'm not putting down building your own guitar. This one started as a new-but-second-hand Warmoth Jackson-style neck from eBay and a bunch of parts (mostly shaken out of other guitars), intended to be my pickup test bed. It *did* require some professional fretwork and a tiny bit of tweaking. It's not that it can't be done, but you need to go into it being realistic about both process and results.

#14
Quote by Beakeroyeast
I disagree with that entirely. When I got my first "kit guitar" I had legitimately no clue where to begin. The box of a hundred little parts plus a half a loom of loose wire and I had to figure it all out... I could have easily said screw it, taken it to someone to build it, wire it and finish it. Had someone told how I was going to screw it up or how hard it is, I probably would have. But there's literally thousands of resources on the interweb thing and you can use all of them. To the OP, if you've got the drive to do so... I say get with it and do it. Shop around for deals or bundle parts, take your time with it and don't let anything/anyone discourage you. It isn't that hard.

I'm not saying that ~determination and friendship~ won't help, nor that OP shouldn't build his own guitar. There are, however, very much practical/manual skills involved, so the best option would be to go fairly cheap the first time around so you can learn what you're doing before you start putting big sums into it and expecting a killer guitar out of it.

You can screw it up quite easily depending on your experience level and having done a practice run or two with cheaper parts will go a long way to ensure that when you make yourself something fancy, it'll all come together without a hitch.

Quote by dspellman

I must say, your name looks great on a headstock
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Youre officially uber shit now.

Quote by StewieSwan
3d9310rd is far more upset than i 

Quote by Bladez22
I'm a moron tho apparently and everyone should listen to you oh wise pretentious one
Last edited by K33nbl4d3 at Sep 21, 2015,
#15
Quote by K33nbl4d3



I must say, your name looks great on a headstock


The guy who finished the body thought it would be a great addition.
I was a bit less enthusiastic.
#16


My seven string I just finished. Like I said... not a difficult process, just detail oriented.
#17
Quote by K33nbl4d3

I must say, your name looks great on a headstock


I'm just annoyed he dropped the silent "d" from the start of it.

Seriously, though, that's a badass-looking guitar (and I'm sure it's a killer guitar too). Some people get too sniffy about pointy guitars, I love them
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Sep 21, 2015,