#1
I am considering getting a Seagull acoustic guitar but the local dealer has a really poor inventory of them so I was wondering if any of you on here have one of these and what you think of it. I listened to a couple demo's on youtube and they sounded pretty darn good and they looked good as well. I am debating as to getting one with electronics or not so if anyone has experiance with the pickups and preamps they use I'd appreciate it.
#2
They still have a good reputation, especially the S6, but I'm not so sure. I read that they had gone from a bolt-on to an epoxied neck joint, a big minus for me. I have no idea whether the story is true or not, but I personally would be doing a bit of research on it before buying ine.
#3
there are many different seagull guitars, but my favorite was the original S6
http://www.seagullguitars.com/seagull_s6_original.html

i loved my original S6, one of the best sounding solid top guitars around with good bass and a hint of sparkle in the top end. not many solid tops can pass for all solid, but the S6 could.

i'd also be concerned about an epoxied on neck joint, though - you could always email seagull and ask. they've always gotten back to me within a couple working days.
http://www.seagullguitars.com/contact.html
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#4
Yes you are correct . I can manage the sound properly in my guitar. The smart resume essay writing service is making lot of essay writing papers and also tips. The students can participate in our writing service for taking their writing papers and maximizing their writing knowledge. our writing company is highly possible for making resume and getting tips for making their essay papers.
Last edited by Viakaer at Oct 1, 2015,
#5
Seagull is my current favorite acoustic gig axe. S6+ with Baggs onboard electronics. Very credible tone that runs with the big boys but not so expensive I worry about taking it to some ratty gigs.
I have owned this one for 15 years now and she is starting to look pretty road worn like one of Tommy Emmanuel's guitars. I am ok with that.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#6
I bought a Seagull Entourage Rustic dreadnaught a month ago for a little over $360. I thought it sounded better than the S6, but that could've been the strings (was playing at Guitarcenter). The S6 felt really solid and handled similarly to the Entourage but it didn't sound as warm/sweet (because of the cedar top on the Entourage?). I think the Entourage also had a slightly narrower nutwidth, but not 100% on that.

I'd give the Entourage Rustic a try, if you can. You might find you like it better than the S6.
#7
Quote by TobusRex
....[ ]....). The S6 felt really solid and handled similarly to the Entourage but it didn't sound as warm/sweet (because of the cedar top on the Entourage?). I think the Entourage also had a slightly narrower nutwidth, but not 100% on that........[ ]......
Believe it or not, you almost have to go out of your way to buy an S-6 with a spruce top. The, "Original S-6" is a solid cedar top. So you would actually have to specify an, "S-6 spruce", to get one. Obviously though, any individual dealer's ordering preferences may differ.

You are on to something though. The strings go a long way toward making the guitar, and then there's relative humidity.

FWIW, Anything that's readily available to me has that 1 11/16" top nut. I certainly "wouldn't throw a 1 3/4" neck out of bed", so to speak. In fact, I'm used to 1 7/8" 12 strings, so I'd actually welcome the slightly wider neck.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 1, 2015,
#8
Interesting stuff Captain. I'm still pretty new to Seagull, didn't know that about S6 and spruce.
#9
My mate used to stock Seagulls, but I can't remember a preponderance of cedar tops in S6s. I'm not saying CC is wrong, it could just have been timing, chance or regional/importer differences. However the point of this post is that I once got the chance to play a cedar top side-by-side with a spruce top, both new, straight out of the box. As a fingerpicker I preferred the cedar top, and might have bought it except it had a horrible boomy wolf tone on one note; i think it was the low G. A 'grasser type flatpicker might have preferred the spruce top, better note definition and dynamics.
#10
Well kidz, here is Seagull's entire list of specs:

http://www.seagullguitars.com/specs.html

Ostensibly, the price point reads from left to right, with the inexpensive guitars on the far left.

Both the Original and Coastline series are about equally split between cedar & spruce.

However, the Coastline S-12 is cedar only. Whether or not I need a reality check is some what questionable, but I've always considered the S-12 and S-6 Cedar original to be sisters. When the topic of Seagull 12 strings comes up, the Coastline is the one virtually always under discussion. I never even knew they made another 12, until I checked tonight. The other 12 is in the least expensive line, and does have a solid spruce top.

FWIW, My Taylor 150e has the wolf tone is the best place possible, right smack on Eb2 -E2. E major open jumps right out at cha!
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 1, 2015,
#11
Quote by Tony Done
My mate used to stock Seagulls, but I can't remember a preponderance of cedar tops in S6s. I'm not saying CC is wrong, it could just have been timing, chance or regional/importer differences..
Well, what I'm basing my claim on, is the fact the S-6 Original cedar, and the Coastline S-12 (cedar also), are the only two guitars Seagull offers left handed.

Typically, only a maker's most prolific sellers are offered left handed.

http://www.seagullguitars.com/specs.html

So, if the spruce S-6 were the better seller, logically you'd think that would be the lefty.
#12
Just an afterthought...I saw the Entourage Rustic referred to as the "S6 Entourage Rustic". So technically I guess the Entourage IS an S6, but with a different top?

As I noted...I didn't detect much difference in the guitars, except I preferred the tone on the Entourage. It seemed warmer. But the strings on the S6 were flat, dead sounding.
#13
Quote by Captaincranky
Well, what I'm basing my claim on, is the fact the S-6 Original cedar, and the Coastline S-12 (cedar also), are the only two guitars Seagull offers left handed.

Typically, only a maker's most prolific sellers are offered left handed.

http://www.seagullguitars.com/specs.html

So, if the spruce S-6 were the better seller, logically you'd think that would be the lefty.


Thanks for the link, it certainly suggests that cedar S6s were more common the spruce ones. All the ones I saw were gloss tops, it was in the days before satin tops became common, so the relative numbers may have been different from the period you are talking about. It would have been maybe 20 years ago, but I'm not sure. Quite a lot of LaSiDo guitars were being sold here at that time, not so many in recent years.
#14
Quote by TobusRex
Just an afterthought...I saw the Entourage Rustic referred to as the "S6 Entourage Rustic". So technically I guess the Entourage IS an S6, but with a different top?
Well, as arguments go, that lacks quite a bit of merit. What someone on the street, or some junior ad copywriter may call it, has no relation to what Godin /Seagull call it, which has nothing to do with "S-6".

My guess on "the difference", would be looking at the neck.

Quote by TobusRex
As I noted...I didn't detect much difference in the guitars, except I preferred the tone on the Entourage. It seemed warmer. But the strings on the S6 were flat, dead sounding.
This is much more plausible. Seagull's line is extensive. There is apt to be more sameness between the models than difference. Obviously, as you scale the price points, there is apt to be more solid wood and bling on the high end guitars.

However, woods overall, likely get pulled from the same piles, and it's very unlikely there are different machines to laminate woods for different lines. If I might use GM cars as an example, you could stick a Chevelle door on a Buick Skylark or Pontiac Tempest, the only thing that wouldn't be the same, would be the outer skin. (This would hold true over several years on certain parts. A 1955 Chevy door would fit ,'55, '56, & '57 Chevy bodies).

Does Seagull go out of their way to select crappier inner laminates for the slightly less expensive guitars? I say probably not. Since that takes extra time. As we all know, "time is money".

Is it possible to have a good Rustic dread, and a poor S-6 Original? Most definitely. The reverse also likely happens very often.

So, Seagull has a vast model selection, and they probably work at preserving that illusion, while at the same time, limiting the actual differences, thereby keeping production costs somewhat under control.

This is something that always scorches my nuggets about Ovation guitars. As you scale the Ovation price ladder, obviously you get more bling. But, the bowl, (save for in some cases color), stays the same. So, without wood choices to merit the price increase, they took to pitching bracing pattern. "This bracing pattern sounds better than the bracing pattern in our lower line". At which point, a few fuses in my head always blew. Well, these "superior braces", are just the same damned sticks glued on at different places and angles. How on earth could that possibly merit a few hundred dollar rise in price?

I haven't been able to get my 2 Epi EJ-200's to sound as good as when they were shipped to me. The only possible differences are, the humidity in my house, and the strings which replaced the OEM versions. Puzzling. (or not) Although thes 2 ostensibly "identical guitars", (save for the finish), do have somewhat different tonal footprints.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 4, 2015,
#15
There is a video by Seagull explaining the Entourage Rustic model. They say they found some wood with excellent tonal qualities but with cosmetic flaws. They saved a lot of money on the wood but had to paint it to make it look better. Frankly I'd have preferred the model with the original flawed color, but I bought it and like it.


Regarding your Epiphones....troubleshooting strategy dictates the simplest/cheapest and most likely fixes first. Maybe get the same type strings the guitars shipped with and put 'em back on?
Last edited by TobusRex at Oct 4, 2015,
#16
Quote by TobusRex
There is a video by Seagull explaining the Entourage Rustic model. They say they found some wood with excellent tonal qualities but with cosmetic flaws. They saved a lot of money on the wood but had to paint it to make it look better. Frankly I'd have preferred the model with the original flawed color, but I bought it and like it.
Well face it, they couldn't exactly say, "we bought wood which is ugly and sounds terrible to boot". That would be pretty much of a non-starter. The truth is probably closer to, "we bought wood of a species known to be good sounding", but this stock had cosmetic flaws. Flaws in wood destined to be the veneer of a laminate, very often has open knot holes which have to be patched. You'll see this at the lumber yard on better grades of plywood. B grade veneer will have patches that are basically shaped like the "CBS eye". Cabinet grade A veneers won't have those, or very few. (IIRC).

Paradoxically, "spalted maple", is cut from dead and rotting trees, and pretty much everyone who plays a guitar loves the look of that....


Quote by TobusRex
Regarding your Epiphones....troubleshooting strategy dictates the simplest/cheapest and most likely fixes first. Maybe get the same type strings the guitars shipped with and put 'em back on?
Well, I did that, and came up with the guitars allegedly being shipped with D'Addarios, exactly the same strings I used as replacements.

What that left me wondering, was whether strings go bad sitting too long in the package, (*), or if they have special OEM strings, designed to last a lot longer than over the counter issue. Yeah, I know that sounds paranoid, but that's pretty much what it seems like.

The sunburst guitar is quite a bit brighter than the natural finished body. It was strident, scary bright out of the box. I'm attributing the tonal difference, (the natural guitar is mellow, the sunburst brighter), to the different grain pattern in the top wood. The natural model has very wide grain, which is claimed propagates bass, and the sunburst has a much tighter grained top, which is said to emphasize treble, and that's how it has worked out. I might actually try brass (80/20) on the blonde guitar, in spite of it being maple, a wood which normally likes PB alloys.


(*) I heretofore had been under the impression that tension and corrosion were what killed strings, not inactivity in a sealed rust preventative package. Although, a rep from D'Addario claimed they only last about 2 years on the shelf.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 5, 2015,