#1
Hello everyone!
So today my uncle came by and gave me his acoustic because he's getting a new one and this one has been sitting on a stand collecting dust for man years now. I'm not sure exactly how long he's had it but I do know he's been playing guitar/bass for a long time.
It's in decent condition, when minor scuffs on the body and frets 1-5 are pretty worn. I'm curious on how to make this really easy to play and really "new".
The dust is pretty easy to get rid of, but that isn't my main concern. What should I do about the feel? The guitar is really hard to play compared to some Taylors I've tried in the past that were really easy to play for me. I'm really into fingerstyle arrangements but I have really tiny fingers so I'm curious on what gauge strings I should get? Btw, I'm not sure what model this is, but it says Anjo on the headstock and says made in korea on the back. Looks like this: http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/ODAwWDYwMA==/z/9VsAAOSwu4BVzRPm/$_35.JPG
I do also play electric guitar, so I have so background on handling and working with guitars, but not very much, especially with acoustics.
Your help is much appreciated.
Last edited by EnormousGnome at Sep 13, 2015,
#2
I would take it to a good tech and have it looked over. The action is adjustable and that coupled with a new set of strings will likely improve the playabiilty a lot.
I would be worried about the worn frets; if they still play cleanly no great problem but replacing the frets would likely cost more than the instrument is worth.
Also, since it's an older instrument (and has been sitting on a stand?) you would want to make sure that the instrument's belly is not pulled up and the neck does not need to be re-set.
Again, that would be expensive.
#3
Quote by EnormousGnome
....[ ]....It's in decent condition, when minor scuffs on the body and frets 1-5 are pretty worn. I'm curious on how to make this really easy to play and really "new"....[ ]...
Well, there's a nickname for just doing the lower frets, ""cowboy fret job", or something similar. Replacing just the lower worn frets would make a world of difference. You need a flat slab of plate glass to block them out once they're in place. The new frets can be slightly higher than those already in place, but they absolutely can't be lower.
Quote by EnormousGnome
The dust is pretty easy to get rid of, but that isn't my main concern. What should I do about the feel? The guitar is really hard to play compared to some Taylors I've tried in the past that were really easy to play for me. I'm really into fingerstyle arrangements but I have really tiny fingers so I'm curious on what gauge strings I should get?
First, before you do anything, maker sure the neck is free of any twist whatsoever. If it's twisted, the guitar is most likely a throwaway.

Two things to keep in mind. The action can't really ever be as low as that of a solid body electric. More importantly the "saddle", (white plastic thingy in the bridge), really can't be level with the top of the bridge. If it is, the guitar's neck needs to be reset. Game over.

As for strings there are pretty much 3 suitable sets, .012 to .053, "acoustic light", .011 to .052, "custom light", and .010 to .047, "extra lights. As to what will be right for you and this guitar, it's gonna depend on how well you can get the action down, and how lazy your fingers have gotten from playing electric. (Sorry, but I call 'em the way I see 'em).
Quote by EnormousGnome
I do also play electric guitar, so I have so background on handling and working with guitars, but not very much, especially with acoustics.
Your help is much appreciated.
Well, you make the same adjustments on acoustic as you do on electric. But instead of allen keys and screwdrivers, you're for the most part going to be using sandpaper. Forget about intonation, the adjustment you have to work with in an acoustic saddle, isn't ever. going to be as spot on as it could be with a TOM bridge.

However, all the same factors are measured in the same spots as on an electric. Here's a guide so you can see what's involved: http://thbecker.net/guitar_playing/guitars_and_setup/setup_page_01.html
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 14, 2015,
#4
fwiw, pix of the actual guitar's problems always work best. small, generic "looks like this one from on ebay" pix not too helpful. actual images of the guitar's issues are still the best way to harvest "to the point answers"

ok, as an obscure Korean import Anjo's in their prime weren't race cars so don't expect a velvety smooth playing experience with supple action and awesome tone.

guitars of this caliber when one speaks of bringing it back to "new" condition take time and money. they can be a real learning experience for someone interested in picking up a new skill set and bolstering the level of ownership -which is great, as well as an interesting pastime. books, tools, money and time, are involved here but it may be worth it to you?.

for the professional though, they can be depending upon the scope of issues of course, a money pit for the owner, and a thorn in the side for the luthier. parts will not be available and everything that needs to be replaced will have to be modded or made from scratch ($$$) fretwork isn't really that big of a deal, but it has an element of careful patient labor to it. when i do fret and neck work i pay maximum attention to detail and take a lot of time. your repair person on the other hand may only do what he/she is paid to do which comes down to whether you can afford it or not.

then there is the question of whether or not the guitar can handle a good set-up in terms of the geometry remaining stable. this Anjo might not even have a truss rod, the top may be rolled up, the nut and saddle may be plastic, the neck may need a re-set, the truss rod (if it has one) may be maxed out, seized, or broken... the list goes on

then again with no real pictures of the guitar, this probably means next to nothing. take it to a shop and get an estimate.

cranky's right about strings.
Last edited by ad_works at Sep 14, 2015,