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#1
Is Lisbon/Lisboa a nice place to visit? If yes, what are some things to check out while in Lisbon/Lisboa?

Can I get around by speaking English (maybe accompanied by exaggerated gesturing)? Would it help at all if I throw in a few random Spanish words or repeat myself over and over again, but increasingly louder and slower?

Like this:
Where is the nearest train station?
Dónde la nearest train station?
Dónde... la nearest... traaaaain staaaaation?
Dónde... la nearest... traaaaain staaaaation?
Dóóóóóónde... la neareeeeeest... traaaaain..... staaaaation?

Thanks for your help
Last edited by ultimate-slash at Sep 14, 2015,
#2
Fraaaaaaaaaaaaaaaanc


Gozd in gora poj,
silen ženimo hrup,
uboga gmajna, le vpup, le vkup,
le vkup, le vkup z menoj,
staro pravdo v mrak tulimo,
da se pretulimo skozi to zimo
#3
franc sucks
dirtbag ballet by the bins down the alley
as i walk through the chalet of the shadow of death
everything that you've come to expect


#6
You'll be fine speaking in English for the most part. You wouldn't need to speak in Spanish. If someone doesn't understand English, try the next person.

It is a very nice place to visit and there are tones of monuments, viewpoints and other sightseeing places. It all depends on what you're looking for.

Either way, Lisboa has a little of everything, so I don't think you'll be disappointed. You can PM me if you need to know anything, or even if you want to hang out.
#7
Oh ye, forgot that Lissabon is the Dutch name for a second, I meant Lisbon/Lisboa of course

But thanks, good to know! Also, wasn't too sure about the Spanish, but I was told by a Portuguese guy (well, he was English, but claimed to be Portuguese, never actually received proof) that Portuguese people understand Spanish pretty well overall, but Spanish people have no clue what Portuguese people say.
Last edited by ultimate-slash at Sep 14, 2015,
#8
Quote by ultimate-slash at #33595012
Oh ye, forgot that Lissabon is the Dutch name for a second, I meant Lisbon/Lisboa of course

But thanks, good to know!
It really all depends in what you're looking for vs the time you plan on staying vs the money you plan on spending.

EDIT: That is true, I just don't think you'll find yourself in a situation where no one around you understands English.
#9
Quote by seventh_angel
It really all depends in what you're looking for vs the time you plan on staying vs the money you plan on spending.

EDIT: That is true, I just don't think you'll find yourself in a situation where no one around you understands English.

Ok, cool. That makes things easier. I always feel bad not speaking the local language, but it helps knowing that the people are at least able to understand me when I speak something else

That being said, I'm only planning to go for a few days. Probably between 3 and 5 days or something, depending on how much stuff I find to do/visit.

This tower is awesome tho:
#10
That's Torre de Belém. If you're going to Belém, spend the day visiting that and Mosteiro dos Jerónimos ( Belém is a very small place, so they're very close ).

It's this:


Also, if you like towers and castles and palaces, you should definitely go to Castelo de São Jorge, right at the top of Lisbon:



And enjoy the viewpoints nearby and old Lisbon.

Also, you should just spend one of the days in Sintra. There's a train that leaves you right there. You have Palácio da Pena:



This castle ( although I don't know if you can visit it yet because they were having archeological works in there a couple of years ago ) called Castelo dos Mouros:



And Quinta da Regaleira, which you should google the images for yourself because it has a lot of stuff.

#11
Quote by ultimate-slash at #33595012
Oh ye, forgot that Lissabon is the Dutch name for a second, I meant Lisbon/Lisboa of course

But thanks, good to know! Also, wasn't too sure about the Spanish, but I was told by a Portuguese guy (well, he was English, but claimed to be Portuguese, never actually received proof) that Portuguese people understand Spanish pretty well overall, but Spanish people have no clue what Portuguese people say.



This is probably true, we do understand some portuguese tho
#12
Fair enough, the guy was probably a little bit biased

^^Those places all look freaking awesome though.
#13
Quote by ultimate-slash at #33595041
Fair enough, the guy was probably a little bit biased

^^Those places all look freaking awesome though.
But in three days you can totally do them all:

One day in Belém - visiting the tower and the monastery.

One day in old Lisbon - visiting the castle and the viewpoints and just walking around

One day in Sintra - Visiting the palace and Quinta da Regaleira and maybe that castle if it's open to the public already

For Sintra you'd need to wake up really early and see the schedules for the places because it'll be the most time consuming and tiresome day in terms of walking and tight schedules. Sure you can make it though because I made it one time. But really, for three days, that's my suggestion ( in any order ) and you'd still have the nights to do whatever.
#15
Quote by slapsymcdougal
This is the only phrase you'll need:

"Bonvolu alsendi la pordiston, laushajne estas rano en mia bideo".


Consider me as one who hopes you don't use this language...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#16
Quote by ultimate-slash
Oh ye, forgot that Lissabon is the Dutch name for a second, I meant Lisbon/Lisboa of course

But thanks, good to know! Also, wasn't too sure about the Spanish, but I was told by a Portuguese guy (well, he was English, but claimed to be Portuguese, never actually received proof) that Portuguese people understand Spanish pretty well overall, but Spanish people have no clue what Portuguese people say.


Portuguese and Spanish can share some subjects and verbs but one person can't really describe anything in the other language. If I were you I would bring a pocket translator, phrase book or if you have a smartphone, use that. Speaking slowly actually does help but don't yell at them because that does not help.
mmmmmmhmmm

That's exactly what I've been trying to say.

Quote by munkymanmatt
brilliant
#17
Quote by HardAttack at #33595082
Portuguese and Spanish can share some subjects and verbs but one person can't really describe anything in the other language. If I were you I would bring a pocket translator, phrase book or if you have a smartphone, use that. Speaking slowly actually does help but don't yell at them because that does not help.

Isn't this one of those pairs of languages that people often speak to one another in the same conversation? I don't know how to phrase that better, but I know people sometimes speak to someone in one language, the other speaks in a similar language, and both understand one another even though each doesn't really speak the other person's language? It's like that thing in Mr. Robot where Tyrell speaks Swedish and Joanna speaks Danish.

EDIT: Mutual intelligibility- that's what it's called.
Free Ali
Last edited by chrismendiola at Sep 14, 2015,
#19
Quote by chrismendiola
Isn't this one of those pairs of languages that people often speak to one another in the same conversation? I don't know how to phrase that better, but I know people sometimes speak to someone in one language, the other speaks in a similar language, and both understand one another even though each doesn't really speak the other person's language? It's like that thing in Mr. Robot where Tyrell speaks Swedish and Joanna speaks Danish.

EDIT: Mutual intelligibility- that's what it's called.


I think it's only a little bit, but I think that it's more one way than the other.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#20
Quote by chrismendiola
Isn't this one of those pairs of languages that people often speak to one another in the same conversation? I don't know how to phrase that better, but I know people sometimes speak to someone in one language, the other speaks in a similar language, and both understand one another even though each doesn't really speak the other person's language? It's like that thing in Mr. Robot where Tyrell speaks Swedish and Joanna speaks Danish.

EDIT: Mutual intelligibility- that's what it's called.


Portugese and Spanish have an exceptionally high lexical similarity (89-90%), but the cadence deviations, local dialects and accents make it more difficult to cross-communicate than it would appear on the surface.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#21
Quote by Arby911
Consider me as one who hopes you don't use this language...

I don't, I only know what that means because of Red Dwarf.
#22
Quote by K'Nuckles at #33595087
Not even the Danes understand Danish.


der elefant har den kartofflen

or something
dirtbag ballet by the bins down the alley
as i walk through the chalet of the shadow of death
everything that you've come to expect


#24
Quote by MinterMan22
portuguese hunnys 💯👌💯

i think remy lacroix is portuguese


Gozd in gora poj,
silen ženimo hrup,
uboga gmajna, le vpup, le vkup,
le vkup, le vkup z menoj,
staro pravdo v mrak tulimo,
da se pretulimo skozi to zimo
#25
Quote by JamSessionFreak at #33595162
i think remy lacroix is portuguese

lol makes sense finest girl in the biz right now
#31
Quote by chrismendiola at #33595086
Isn't this one of those pairs of languages that people often speak to one another in the same conversation? I don't know how to phrase that better, but I know people sometimes speak to someone in one language, the other speaks in a similar language, and both understand one another even though each doesn't really speak the other person's language? It's like that thing in Mr. Robot where Tyrell speaks Swedish and Joanna speaks Danish.

EDIT: Mutual intelligibility- that's what it's called.

Nah if somebody's speaking Portuguese I can't understand anything
Quote by jakesmellspoo
ooh look at me i'm ERIKLENSHERR and i work at fancy pants desk jobs and wear ties and ply barely legal girls with weed and booze i'm such a classy motherfucker.
#32
Seriously though, I'm from Porto so you're better off just listening to what seventh says because he's a local (I think he's the only Lisbon guy here that I know of really).

As for the English thing, most non-old people and most shop attendants and stuff will speak English, don't worry. If you know a bit of Spanish it will probably be useful for somewhat deciphering written stuff you just find on the street. (Just like knowing a little bit of German helps me have a bit of a clue about Dutch over here (not that I often need to cuz bilingualism))
#33
So my brother and I booked a four day trip to Lisbon in November. Haven't decided which of the mentioned castles and stuff we're going to visit, but we'll at least try to see one or two of them.

Anyone know of any Portuguese foods/drinks/whatever we definitely need to try? I know there's a lot of fish involved in Portuguese cuisine, which I'm definitely ok with
Other than that I'm completely ignorant of anything to do with Portugal
#34
Quote by Trowzaa
der elefant har den kartofflen

or something

A poem.
Quote by yoman297
no girl, movember isnt for you. shave your stache pls

I can out-bore you any day
#36
Quote by ultimate-slash at #33625584
So my brother and I booked a four day trip to Lisbon in November. Haven't decided which of the mentioned castles and stuff we're going to visit, but we'll at least try to see one or two of them.

Anyone know of any Portuguese foods/drinks/whatever we definitely need to try? I know there's a lot of fish involved in Portuguese cuisine, which I'm definitely ok with
Other than that I'm completely ignorant of anything to do with Portugal
We're pretty good with grilled fish and meat ( I'd totally recommend black pork ). My problem is that I don't really like most of those reeeeally traditional dishes. but, from the top of my head you have:

Soups:
- Caldo Verde
- Canja de Galinha

Meat:
- Francesinha
- Cozido à Portuguesa
- Feijoada

Fish:
- Tons of codfish dishes
- Sardines ( not the season, though, so not advisable )

Drinks:
- Ginja

Deserts:
So many I can't even know where to begin. I'm not a desert kind of guy.


But honestly, I don't adore anything I've recommended you

What I'd recommend is grilled dishes ( black pork, fish - like dourada or robalo ), fried fish with tomato rice or steaks in a place that knows how to make them.

Either way, google all of those I mentioned to see what appeals to you. Like before, if you want to PM me with anything, go ahead
#37
Awesome, thanks!

Grilled fish and meat is always great, so we'll always have that to fall back on. But I have to say, both the Francesinha and Feijoada look pretty interesting, and I wonder if they taste the way you'd expect them to taste based on how they look.
Curious about the Ginja as well.
#38
Quote by ultimate-slash at #33625654
Awesome, thanks!

Grilled fish and meat is always great, so we'll always have that to fall back on. But I have to say, both the Francesinha and Feijoada look pretty interesting, and I wonder if they taste the way you'd expect them to taste based on how they look.
Curious about the Ginja as well.
I like how Francesinha tastes, but it's too... can't find the word in English, but it's basically too agressive in terms of flavor and it makes me full of it pretty quickly. I don't like Feijoada because I don't like beans, unless it's a bean soup

A lot of people like Ginja

I mean, I'm all up to trying new dishes, I'm just a bit picky with food; obviously a lot of people like all of those I mentioned
#39
I have to say, as someone from Porto, the thought of a francesinha in the south makes me a little bit revolted but yeah do have it if you have the chance and an empty stomach. Also if you're up for eating octopus ( some foreigners find it a bit repulsive idk) you should try some octopus dish. Also hit up the Pastéis de Belém.

Also I might be going to Amsterdam in a couple of weeks

Also I just realised I began every sentence with also but I'mon my phone and cba to rephrase.
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