#1
ok this is going to sound really weird, but would anyone be able to transcribe some riffs I have recorded myself "singing" aloud.

I always hear how riffs should go in my head but when ever I pick up a guitar they just sound completely different, I have the same problem when trying to transcribe music I already know from memory.

I don't even know if it can be done seeing as i'm not "singing" the intervals properly but it should give you's an idea, even if you's have to improvise a little

is there another way to upload them? the files that is, apparently they're to big

yes I'm aware of how stupid I sound.

here are the sound files

http://www.4shared.com/music/ZF4TD4SWce/second_idea.html
http://www.4shared.com/music/lNQ7avq5ce/first_idea.html
http://www.4shared.com/music/DSbbWUrvce/thatll_do.html
http://www.4shared.com/music/znpakEXlba/bend_riff.html
http://www.4shared.com/music/a5A1dXo6ce/yep_thatll_do.html
#3
I did two of them (first idea and second idea) that sounded most clear to me. There was one lick that you need to figure out yourself in the first idea, because I couldn't be sure about the notes you sang. It's the first ending. I wrote the open string notes (in between the accented notes), you need to figure out the rest (replace the rests with notes). It's some kind of a descending line. Just try different notes if you can't figure it out any other way.

Well, hope this helps. I know they are not perfect, and I don't know which notes you want to be power chords. I added some power chords to the second riff to accent certain notes, but you can of course change it.


It was just my interpretation of what you sang.
Attachments:
first idea.gp5
second idea.gp5
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Sep 15, 2015,
#4
thanks maggara, the second idea you did was pretty much spot on, power chords and everything. I guess I'll have to work on the singing side of things as well, do you think learning solfege would help in this regard?
#5
^ I would suggest learning songs by ear. Listen to a song, try to match the pitches. But don't try to find the pitch before you know what pitch you are looking for. Know the sound of it before trying to find it.

Yeah, you may want to do something like solfege. Your goal would be to be able to hear clear pitches, not just "random" noises that are kind of close to something. And I think that's the problem here. You may not really know exactly what you are after, and that's why when you try to play your ideas, it may not sound the same as what you thought of (because you didn't really know what you thought of). You want to be able to think in pitch.

Learning to name the pitches you hear helps. Learn the intervals. I usually think in scale degrees (meaning the interval between the note I'm playing and the tonic).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#6
Thanks for the advice.
not just "random" noises that are kind of close to something. And I think that's the problem here.

I think you're right. when you say "Learning to name the pitches you hear helps" do you mean you find a note for reference, identify that notes pitch and then use that pitch as a reference point to help you find the rest or do you just call the pitches aloud .I'm sorry if this doesn't make much sense, I haven't studied a lot of theory.
one more question. say I wanted to move away from composing with a guitar and use solely my voice and guitar pro, what steps would i have to take, I feel like I have learned too many patterns and my fingers gravitate towards playing those
thanks again
#7
Quote by poor_musician
Thanks for the advice.
I think you're right. when you say "Learning to name the pitches you hear helps" do you mean you find a note for reference, identify that notes pitch and then use that pitch as a reference point to help you find the rest or do you just call the pitches aloud .I'm sorry if this doesn't make much sense, I haven't studied a lot of theory.
one more question. say I wanted to move away from composing with a guitar and use solely my voice and guitar pro, what steps would i have to take, I feel like I have learned too many patterns and my fingers gravitate towards playing those
thanks again


I'll answer each seperately, as there are loads of answers.

I think you're right. when you say "Learning to name the pitches you hear helps" do you mean you find a note for reference, identify that notes pitch and then use that pitch as a reference point to help you find the rest or do you just call the pitches aloud .I'm sorry if this doesn't make much sense, I haven't studied a lot of theory.


Study theory, first of all. Learn what the keys are and what scales sound like, the intervals will come then. Do some ear training if you want, learn to recognise intervals, transcribe in guitar pro, or start playing your ideas on a keyboard, and eventually you'll be able to do this easily.

one more question. say I wanted to move away from composing with a guitar and use solely my voice and guitar pro, what steps would i have to take,


First, take your voice out of the equation, it does nothing. You're not a trained singer, and so you'll be very limited as to what you can do, you just replace your guitar limitations with your voice. Use what's in your head, and learn to put that into Guitar Pro. Get a keyboard phone app and use that to get you started, and then use that to help you into Guitar pro. Eventually, you won't need a keyboard.

Another thing you can do with Guitar pro is create music by trial and error, don't even think. Decide on a key, use that scale (Major or minor, nothing mad), and start clicking on notes until you hear something you like. As you go on, you'll start to get a feel for it, and start composing without any instruments.

I feel like I have learned too many patterns and my fingers gravitate towards playing those
thanks again


Then you're taking the right steps to solve that problem. If you continue on with guitar pro and don't give up, you'll stop relying on patterns and start writing decent music.
#8
Quote by poor_musician
Thanks for the advice.
I think you're right. when you say "Learning to name the pitches you hear helps" do you mean you find a note for reference, identify that notes pitch and then use that pitch as a reference point to help you find the rest or do you just call the pitches aloud .I'm sorry if this doesn't make much sense, I haven't studied a lot of theory.

I would recommend finding the tonic - the home note/chord - and using that as a reference point. That's what I meant when I talked about scale degrees.

I don't think traditional theory is going to help you that much right now to be honest. Nothing wrong with learning it of course, and I would definitely suggest learning theory. What I mean is that maybe all the major key stuff and diatonic chords are not that useful for the music you write. Well, minor key is. But to understand everything properly, you need to start with the basics.

Understanding theory has a lot to do with being able to connect the explanation to the sound. But if the music you write/listen to has nothing to do with the major scale or diatonic chords for example, it's hard to understand those things in practice. I'm not against learning it - I would actually suggest learning it. But for what you want to do right now, I don't think it will help that much (at least not the very basics). And I say this as a future music theory teacher.

One thing I would suggest learning is the intervals. That's the first thing I would do. Learn the sound of them and learn how to play them. As I said, use the tonic as your reference point. At least that's what I would do, and that's what solfege is about.

one more question. say I wanted to move away from composing with a guitar and use solely my voice and guitar pro, what steps would i have to take, I feel like I have learned too many patterns and my fingers gravitate towards playing those
thanks again

I think a musician should be able to sing in pitch. It doesn't need to sound beautiful, but you need to be able to sing the correct pitches. That helps a lot. Maybe sing what you play, play what you sing.

Honestly, I'm not completely sure what you should do, because I have never had problems with singing the right pitches. I would just suggest learning songs by ear. If you hear a melody, maybe try to sing it before figuring it out (so that you internalize the pitches you are looking for before trying to find them on your guitar). Also, if you have a notation/tab for some melody, first play it on your guitar and try to match all the pitches with your voice. A teacher would definitely help.

But yeah, it is a good idea to also be able to write songs when you don't have a guitar in your hand. You don't want to be stuck with playing what your fingers remember. So, when you are writing songs, don't play anything until you hear something. Do what you have done so far. Record the ideas. After some time, as your ear has developed, you may not even need to record your singing any more - you can just pick up your guitar and figure out the notes you are hearing.


Just learn songs by ear. I think that's the best way of training your ears. It is not boring, and you benefit from it in many different ways - you learn new songs and your ear also develops.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115