#1
Hey everyone,

I've just written a new article -

I imagine people round here would find that kinda thing interesting.... Hope you find it useful.

Comments welcome

Nick
---

One Flight Up |
#2
Thanks Nick, now I know who to call if I'm ever playing a gig in an Australian shitter, and need a recording guy...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#4
Cool article, but I think there is still more to it. I have some pretty nice hi gain tube amps, v30 speakers, tubescreamers, solid guitars, sm57 mics (among other good dynamic mics), and a great interface- but iv noticed that my guitar tone still needs alot of work for the mix to sound like a lot of the modern metalcore bands that I listen to and like (even when my tone seems to sound GREAT in my room).

On a recent mix I worked on, I had to apply pretty drastic shelf boosts of 1-2.5db (bass and ultra treble) and cuts (midrange) to get the guitars sounding huge and powerful instead of weak and really audible.
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#5
Nice job Nick. I agree with Arby 911 that #1 is the biggest and best tip. I spent a few years as a studio engineer back in the old days of analog tape (24 track Otari). Like you I can relate to the time wasted by guitar players who waited until mix time to decide that their recorded guitar didn't sound like they wanted. At the time of the initial tracking I would ask repeatedly if that's the sound they wanted. I would record 30 seconds of guitar and invite them into the booth to hear it. They would say that it's great then on mix day would want me to drench the track with big heaps of EQ and effects trying to magically make the guitar and amp sound like something it wasn't when it was recorded. Get it right before you hit the record button. 1# hits the nail on the head.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#6
^Watterboy:
Hard to say without knowing more information but maybe your problem is you're getting your tone to sound great by itself without knowing how it will sound in the mix? Set up the tone with the whole band, and keep an ear out for what it sounds like directly in front of the amp up close [as that's what the mic will pick up]. I won't profess to know what metalcore producers do guitars for there sound, but I'd imagine that if you're doing too much post production then the problem is the tone being recorded.

Although upon rereading your post it just seems like that is just getting things to sit in the mix properly for a tight metal sound
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Last edited by mulefish at Sep 16, 2015,
#7
Quote by mulefish
^Watterboy:
Hard to say without knowing more information but maybe your problem is you're getting your tone to sound great by itself without knowing how it will sound in the mix? Set up the tone with the whole band, and keep an ear out for what it sounds like directly in front of the amp up close [as that's what the mic will pick up]. I won't profess to know what metalcore producers do guitars for there sound, but I'd imagine that if you're doing too much post production then the problem is the tone being recorded.

Although upon rereading your post it just seems like that is just getting things to sit in the mix properly for a tight metal sound


I always monitor with my ears right in front of my 4x12, and thats exactly what I tell other people to do even when just practicing, because frankly, I think your tone sounds worlds better when you are sitting right in front of your speaker.

But yea- I think its contradictory for the article to say "choose a tone that sounds great to you when you listen in the room" and then confess that "wellll..actually thats not really that case- you gotta anticipate what the band is going to sound like". You wont necessarily have the whole band in one room because this is a studio/recording environment. And even if you did have the band all there, the tone that works out loud with the band will probably sound completely overexaggerated and overly present once you have double tracked panned guitars. The irony is, I have listened intently to all the people saying "mids mids mids!! Dont scoop your mids! Easy on the bass!" And that is how i dial in (and my amps have great midrange in person. They dont sound honky; very chunky and cutting); but when it comes to the mix, it just doesnt seem to work in that context.

I liked the article, but I didnt think it took many risks in terms of suggestions to get actually get a good guitar tone recorded.. It was all sort of just obvious suggestions. Like duh, nobody is gonna turn their bass and mids to 0 and then treble to 10 and expect the recorded sound in the mic to magically be amazing.

How about this for a more out of the box recommendation to getting a great recorded guitar sound: stop relying solely on the guitar. It doesnt matter what settings you use, a guitar playing a powerchord alone will never sound as good as a powerchord plus the bass guitar beneath it plus a kick and crash to emphasize the attack. Context of mix is HUGE when it comes to CONVINCING the listener that you have a great guitar sound.. You really dont have a great guitar sound; you just have a great mix
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#8
Hi Everyone,

Thanks for checking out the article.

Rockholly74 - we've had the same experiences! Reading your post I know exactly the insane frustration you're describing!

Watterboy - I don't produce metal so I can't be too much of a help with your specific situation. You're right though, there's a lot of factors involved in getting the electric guitars sounding right on the finished record. I'm planning to do another article soon about guitars in the mix. This one's focus was just recording.

I realize a lot of us guitar players who've recorded before will find the advice in the article pretty obvious, but you'd be surprised how many people don't know these things, and need to know!
The article isn't the definitive recording guide for electric guitar, more an easy to follow, "cover all the bases" piece for people who don't want to spend too long reading up before they try and record themselves.

Regarding EQ: never follow people's advice when they say "you have to eq guitars this way". Alarm bells should ring right there. Some guitars might want mids added, some will want the opposite. It all depends on the recording, which in turn depends on: guitar, pedals, amp, mic, mic setup, room, and so on.

So whenever anyone tries to give you a definitive "this is how you EQ guitar" (or any instrument). Don't listen to them!! Every single recording of anything is going to be different. Trust your ears, your monitors and your monitoring environment.

Cheers!

Nick
http://www.oneflightup.com.au
#9
Thanks looking forward to your next article
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Watterboy, I love you.

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You are now my favourite person on UG.....You write cool shit.

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#10
Quote by Watterboy
Cool article, but I think there is still more to it. I have some pretty nice hi gain tube amps, v30 speakers, tubescreamers, solid guitars, sm57 mics (among other good dynamic mics), and a great interface- but iv noticed that my guitar tone still needs alot of work for the mix to sound like a lot of the modern metalcore bands that I listen to and like (even when my tone seems to sound GREAT in my room).

On a recent mix I worked on, I had to apply pretty drastic shelf boosts of 1-2.5db (bass and ultra treble) and cuts (midrange) to get the guitars sounding huge and powerful instead of weak and really audible.

Sounds like you're micing the speaker really close to the center dust cap. Move it further out on the cone and you'll get a smoother, bigger, tone. I rarely have to do more than a HPF/LPF on my miced guitar tones.
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