#1
I have a 140 Watt and 8 Ohlm Marshal Cab, I have a Head thats older and needs to petals ran through it to get any sort of noce sound, that one is 200 watts and 8 Ohlms, I Got them together so i asume they work together, but i want to buy a new Head perferably a Marshal or Peavey. So how many watts and how many Ohlms should it be to match myarshal cab?

Also can someone give me a rule of thumb when dealing with this Stuff, like watts and Ohmls with amps.
#2
Ideally your cabinet should be able to handle more watts than your head puts out. But most people aren't cranking their amps to the point of being near speaker damage anyway so unless you are playing arenas you shouldn't have too much to worry about.

Ohms should always be matched. You can technically run them mismatched in certain situations, but there's really no point if you can match them. Running a head at higher ohmage than the cab will start frying your power section.
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
Electra Omega Prime Ceruse
Fender Franken-Jag Bass

Amps and the like:
Laney VH100R
Seismic Luke 2x12
Dunlop 105Q Wah
Gojira FX 808
Line 6 M9
#3
Quote by TheStig1214
Running a head at higher ohmage than the cab will start frying your power section.


And by that he means a lower number. 16 ohms is double the resistance of 8, and at 16 ohms your head will generally produce LESS power because it has more resistance to push through. 4 ohms is half the resistance of 8, and your head will generally produce MORE power if it has less resistance to push through. The danger there to the HEAD is that you can overheat components and it can become unstable and damage components. For example, most tube amps don't do well facing 2 ohms of resistance, so putting a pair of 4 ohm cabinets in parallel can melt an expensive transformer.

Wattage, on the other hand, is simpler. In a speaker, it's an indication of how much heat the voice coil of the speaker can dissipate (did you know that most of the power produced by your head is actually lost to heat?). If your speaker will handle MORE watts of power, that means that it will dissipate MORE heat before burning out. That doesn't necessarily mean the speaker will be louder; that's determined by the sensitivity/efficiency of the speaker, which is a whole 'nother thing.
#4
^ Yup
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
Electra Omega Prime Ceruse
Fender Franken-Jag Bass

Amps and the like:
Laney VH100R
Seismic Luke 2x12
Dunlop 105Q Wah
Gojira FX 808
Line 6 M9
#5
Quote by dspellman
And by that he means a lower number. 16 ohms is double the resistance of 8, and at 16 ohms your head will generally produce LESS power because it has more resistance to push through. 4 ohms is half the resistance of 8, and your head will generally produce MORE power if it has less resistance to push through. The danger there to the HEAD is that you can overheat components and it can become unstable and damage components. For example, most tube amps don't do well facing 2 ohms of resistance, so putting a pair of 4 ohm cabinets in parallel can melt an expensive transformer.

Wattage, on the other hand, is simpler. In a speaker, it's an indication of how much heat the voice coil of the speaker can dissipate (did you know that most of the power produced by your head is actually lost to heat?). If your speaker will handle MORE watts of power, that means that it will dissipate MORE heat before burning out. That doesn't necessarily mean the speaker will be louder; that's determined by the sensitivity/efficiency of the speaker, which is a whole 'nother thing.



Ah so that makes sense. Never really understand ohms. My head has an 8ohm switch for one can and 4 ohm switch if I run 2 cabs.