#1
I'm considering buying a VST of a sampled ESP Eclipse:

http://www.amplesound.net/en/pro-pd.asp?id=16

(I know it's no substitute for a real guitar, but I don't have time to put in the years of practice it takes to get good at guitar, so a VST is better than nothing in my case.)

I'm demoing it, and on the low string I hear fret buzz. I recognize the sound from when I try to play real guitar, and I always try to steer clear of fret buzz when I play the real thing.

I told the company I probably won't buy it because of the fret buzz. They reply:

AME has fret buzz because the tune of AME is C G C F A D, it is not normal E A D G B E. every metal guitar with lower tune has fret buzz, that is not a problem because this kind of guitars only are played for High gain distortion, you will not hear the fret buzz anymore when using High gain.

If you play clean guitar or warm overdrive, please select AGG [Gibson] AGF [Fender], AME is for metal only and the clean sound of AGG AGF are far more beautiful than AME, but for high gain metal, AME sounds better.

(Their Gibson and Fender do sound great to me, and they don't have fret buzz. I own their AGM acoustic, and I like it too.)

How true is what they're saying about fret-buzz on drop-tuned guitars at high gain? When you drop-tune and amp at high gain, do you stop worrying about fret buzz, or do you still try to avoid it?
Last edited by BachRules at Sep 16, 2015,
#2
It's true that, when you downtune a guitar, fret buzz tends to happen. It's also true that fret buzz is usually barely audible through high gain distorsion

But it can be a real problem nonetheless. Even if you don't directly hear it over the high distorsion, it will degrade your tone as your strings hit the fretboard at multiple locations, dampening harmonics.

Fortunately it isn't an unavoidable problem. Adjusting the gauge of some (or all) strings and setting the guitar's action accordingly will eliminate the buzz.

I had that problem twice:

- My 6-string developed fret buzz when I downtuned it to drop C#. My luthier suggested some gauge changes and adjusted the floating bridge's height. Now fret buzz is gone.
- When I bought a 7-string, the low B had heavy fret buzz because the action was too low. After it was corrected, the sound (tone and power) of that string changed spectacularly for the better, including with high gain distorsion.
Guitars: Music Man JP7 2009 (piezo) and JP6 2013, Fender Stratocaster US 1991
Last edited by Yuka66 at Sep 16, 2015,
#3
A properly set up guitar, no matter the tuning, shouldn't exhibit excessive fret buzz.

Not every metal guitar with lower tuning has fret buzz, sorry. They've been misled, their samples are defective, and as a result, they're handing you a pile of baloney.
#4
Quote by BachRules


(I know it's no substitute for a real guitar, but I don't have time to put in the years of practice it takes to get good at guitar, so a VST is better than nothing in my case.)


It can very MUCH be a substitute for a real guitar.

You'd be really surprised at how much guitar on current recordings was actually played on a keyboard.

Producers are often no longer willing to pay for cartage to get a guitar player to the studio, explain what they're looking for and then find that the guitar player isn't capable of producing it.

More often, recently, they've turned to a sampled guitar, done the part on a keyboard and saved the time and money that a guitar player would otherwise have cost. Given some budgets and time constraints, there's really no other way.
#5
Not true. I've got a six-string Ibanez S tuned to standard A, and there's no fret buzz. It's all about setting up the truss rod, using the right gauge of strings, and adjusting the intonation for the tuning you're using. I've also got a seven-string Schecter tuned to G# without buzz. I mean, realistically if you're bashing your strings to death with an overly-heavy hand, it'll buzz some at least, but if you're playing somewhat more normally and the guitar is set up properly, you shouldn't get much, if any, fret buzz. Regardless of tuning.

“We’re built of contradictions, all of us. It’s those opposing forces that give us strength, like an arch, each block pressing the next. Give me a man whose parts are all aligned in agreement and I’ll show you madness. We walk a narrow path, insanity to each side. A man without contradictions to balance him will soon veer off.”



silentfall.bandcamp.com
#6
Quote by dspellman
It can very MUCH be a substitute for a real guitar.

You'd be really surprised at how much guitar on current recordings was actually played on a keyboard.

Producers are often no longer willing to pay for cartage to get a guitar player to the studio, explain what they're looking for and then find that the guitar player isn't capable of producing it.

More often, recently, they've turned to a sampled guitar, done the part on a keyboard and saved the time and money that a guitar player would otherwise have cost. Given some budgets and time constraints, there's really no other way.

Interesting. I can get nice high-gain rhythm guitar from virtual instruments, but not successful getting clean leads (will keep trying).
#7
I have to believe you three about the fret buzz. With high-gain amp, it might not be easily recognizable as fret buzz, but it's still going to degrade the sound quality; and since it's avoidable, I'm going to pass on libraries that have it.

I've never drop-tuned my real guitars, but when they've buzzed, I threw out the takes, fixed the guitars, and re-recorded without buzz.

Thanks very much.
Last edited by BachRules at Sep 16, 2015,
#8
Quote by BachRules
Interesting. I can get nice high-gain rhythm guitar from virtual instruments, but not successful getting clean leads (will keep trying).


Leads can be a bit of a PIA because they really require some technique and practice, so it's ALMOST as intensive as learning the part on the guitar (but not quite). The really good samples have all the squeaks and slides and velocity things going on, but learning HOW to use them and where to use them can take a bit of time.
#9
Quote by dspellman
Leads can be a bit of a PIA because they really require some technique and practice, so it's ALMOST as intensive as learning the part on the guitar (but not quite). The really good samples have all the squeaks and slides and velocity things going on, but learning HOW to use them and where to use them can take a bit of time.

Are there any virtual-guitar VST's you recommend for this? I understand I'll still have to put in time and do things right to get good results, but I'm not even sure which VST's I should be working with for leads. ?
#10
Quote by BachRules
Are there any virtual-guitar VST's you recommend for this? I understand I'll still have to put in time and do things right to get good results, but I'm not even sure which VST's I should be working with for leads. ?


Nah, I can't tell you. I had several bookmarked on another computer and it went belly up. I'm in search mode myself at the moment. You'll find them if you dig around the Korg Kronos forums on the Korg board, however.