#1
As the title say How to learn scale?

I'm kinda newb and only playing for 9 month now since dec 2014.
I play song from beatles to Metal and Hard rock.
I have a hard time learning new thing about guitar beside learning my favorite song, I really want to learn Scale to jamming when I get bored with my favorite song.
I can play solo but I read tab. I can use my ear but it take time and discourage me. Also I don't learn anything new from play other people tab.
But I do learn something also,

And here my random riff, please be nice as I don't know scale of fret board and only know that I need to skip 1 note to make my solo sound good, I dont know why.

https://soundcloud.com/oudamseth-samin/my-riff

I listen to this record again after record and I know I lack something but I just upload it jsut to need opinion from people.
#3
Quote by edg
I would start with scales only for practicing fingering, technique, timing, theory, etc...

If you really want to learn how to solo well, don't begin with scales. Learn how to play the chord tones on the chord changes.


Does the riff I am playing is right or wrong?
#5
Quote by sosxradar
As the title say How to learn scale?
I agree with edg, don't learn scales, learn chords. And learn songs too.
Quote by sosxradar

And here my random riff, please be nice as I don't know scale of fret board and only know that I need to skip 1 note to make my solo sound good, I dont know why.

https://soundcloud.com/oudamseth-samin/my-riff

I listen to this record again after record and I know I lack something but I just upload it jsut to need opinion from people.
Whoever told you you need to skip 1 note is right. There's 1 note too many (at the end of the first part of the riff, around 0:08)) for it to fit a 4/4 bar, which it sounds like it should.
OK, maybe you meant to play a 5/4 measure after three 4/4s (or a 9/8 after one 4/4, depending on how you count the pulse), in which case it's OK - but it sounds like a mistake, as if you don't know where the beat should be. (The riff kind of deteriorates after that, more random in both tempo and structure.)

My advice (at the moment) is to play to a metronome or drum machine track, to make sure you can fit into the beat. If you really do want the odd irregular measure in your riff, you'd have to program the drum machine accordingly.

Timing is critical, in other words. Get the timing right before worrying about the notes.
Last edited by jongtr at Sep 17, 2015,
#6
To me that didn't sound like a riff. The beginning did but then it started sounding like noodling around. It's not right or wrong, it just didn't sound like a proper riff to me.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#7
I will give you a great piece of advice that I just learned not long ago.
When you start learning a scale (or riff or whatever) make sure you take your time and try to play it correctly the first time you try, no matter how slowly you have to play. If you make a mistake when you first learn something, it becomes imbedded in your muscle memory, and it's more work to correct that.
#8
I just randomly tapping the note. I can make other solo or if you want to clarifyu.
It's not scripted. so I have no clue what did I miss.
Last edited by sosxradar at Sep 17, 2015,
#9
Quote by edg
I would start with scales only for practicing fingering, technique, timing, theory, etc...

If you really want to learn how to solo well, don't begin with scales. Learn how to play the chord tones on the chord changes.


Chord tones and scales tend to be pretty much the same thing, over the course of a few chords. It's just a different way of moving through them. Chords and arpeggios do need equal time with scales, though. You need to have them all at the ready so you can play both approaches.
#10
Quote by cdgraves
Chord tones and scales tend to be pretty much the same thing, over the course of a few chords. It's just a different way of moving through them. Chords and arpeggios do need equal time with scales, though. You need to have them all at the ready so you can play both approaches.


Yeah, kind of, It's just a different way of thinking about it.