#1
Hello guys.
I have a nice old alder or basswood guitar body. I removed pups, bridge and everything else from it and left only the wood. A mate of mine promised to remove old ugly black paint from it and do some proper sanding and a very small body form mod which I want. He works on a factory near Tver and has required tools and gear there. I actually thought to make a natural finish guitar body, because I like how natural finish looks. This evening an idea came to me - is there any chance I could paint a guitar with my blood before doing the lacquer stuff? Is there a way to make paint for a wood from blood? Should I add alcohol or something else to make it stop clotting?
Special guitar paints seem to be expensive, toxic and hard to use, and blood painting costs nearly nothing and will make this guitar even more "my own". I also have a paramedic friend, who can extract some blood from me with no big harm.
Googling didn't give much. Some articles about a bald artist and his blood painting
Please help.
#3
Quote by slapsymcdougal
You do know it'll turn a sort of rust brown, right?


Sure, I don't expect it to be red like fresh blood, I understand what it looks like after some time, like on a t-shirt or whatever.
PRS SE Singlecut with Seymour Duncan Hot Rodded Humbucker Set
VOX AC30VR hybrid amplifier
Victim of chronical russian despare.
#4
It's just going to look like s--t over time, if it doesn't off the bat. Save yourself the trouble, pony up the cash and find some ox blood red automotive paint and call it a day. If you feel like shedding blood, go make a donation at a local blood bank to help someone in need.
Gear: Gibson Les Paul Studio, Gibson SG Special, Fender Stratocaster, Fender Telecaster, Fender Jazzmaster, Gretsch Pro Jet, Carvin C350, Epiphone ES-339 P90, Epiphone ES-335 Pro. Peavey 6505, Sovtek MIG-100, Vox AC30, Peavey XXX.
#5
Quote by ThunderPunk
It's just going to look like s--t over time, if it doesn't off the bat. Save yourself the trouble, pony up the cash and find some ox blood red automotive paint and call it a day. If you feel like shedding blood, go make a donation at a local blood bank to help someone in need.


I wanted to make it a lowcost project. I have a guitar to play, this is more about amazing process then about amazing result. I have some cash, actually, but I'd rather spend it on something else. Russia is in horrible crysis now, living is rather tough.
Also, they won't accept my blood, cause I'm type one diabetic and have a lot of blood issues.
PRS SE Singlecut with Seymour Duncan Hot Rodded Humbucker Set
VOX AC30VR hybrid amplifier
Victim of chronical russian despare.
#6
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#7
In all seriousness, you do realise you'll need quite a bit to cover the entire guitar with enough coats. Which means multiple lettings. You'd be better off adding some of your blood to a paint if you're aiming to utilise the energy.
#8
Quote by Candlewolf
In all seriousness, you do realise you'll need quite a bit to cover the entire guitar with enough coats. Which means multiple lettings. You'd be better off adding some of your blood to a paint if you're aiming to utilise the energy.

Maybe for the sake of personalisation, an oil finish to the body, but the blood - plus a thinner to make it flow better for application - could be painted on in a 'splatter' pattern. Or used to sign it somewhere?
#9
This is not a particularly new process, nor very amazing.

This gets done often enough, but the guitar looks like crap, ends up smelling funny and is cool for about 15 minutes until everyone gets tired of hearing about it. Back in Iowa we used to go down to the Dubuque Pack and pick up pig or cow's blood and use that. It's like Angelina Jolie wearing a vial of Billy Bob Thornton's blood around back when. After a while, you sort of wish she'd taken a lot bigger sample. A LOT. But there's always someone who thinks it's a cool talking point for a while. And then their IQ sneaks into the low two digits and they rethink.

It's the kind of "amazing" that will, eventually, occur to you as being just "stupid" a bit further on. Be aware that you're going to have to coat the stuff with a Polyurethane clear coat anyway, or it will just rot off.

There are other options for paint/coatings, by the way, that do NOT involve largish purchases. This includes milk paint http://www.bobvila.com/articles/milk-paint-recipe/#.VftfCXs7T7A though you'll likely want to coat it, too, with a clear coat of some kind. Milk (casein) paint was extensively used on vintage furniture.

You might also try French Polish if you've got a decent chunk of wood under there. At one point Gibson used french polish as the preferred method of finishing its instruments. It's a bit delicate and easily screwed up once done, but it's also easily repaired. It's inexpensive but time consuming and the results are really nice.
Last edited by dspellman at Sep 17, 2015,
#10
Quote by dspellman
This is not a particularly new process, nor very amazing.

This gets done often enough, but the guitar looks like crap, ends up smelling funny and is cool for about 15 minutes until everyone gets tired of hearing about it. Back in Iowa we used to go down to the Dubuque Pack and pick up pig or cow's blood and use that. It's like Angelina Jolie wearing a vial of Billy Bob Thornton's blood around back when. After a while, you sort of wish she'd taken a lot bigger sample. A LOT. But there's always someone who thinks it's a cool talking point for a while. And then their IQ sneaks into the low two digits and they rethink.


No one is going to know about it, just me. Blood painting on my guitar is never going to be a talking point.

Quote by dspellman

There are other options for paint/coatings, by the way, that do NOT involve largish purchases. This includes milk paint http://www.bobvila.com/articles/milk-paint-recipe/#.VftfCXs7T7A though you'll likely want to coat it, too, with a clear coat of some kind. Milk (casein) paint was extensively used on vintage furniture.

You might also try French Polish if you've got a decent chunk of wood under there. At one point Gibson used french polish as the preferred method of finishing its instruments. It's a bit delicate and easily screwed up once done, but it's also easily repaired. It's inexpensive but time consuming and the results are really nice.


Thanks, I'll think about it.

Maybe for the sake of personalisation, an oil finish to the body, but the blood - plus a thinner to make it flow better for application - could be painted on in a 'splatter' pattern. Or used to sign it somewhere?



In all seriousness, you do realise you'll need quite a bit to cover the entire guitar with enough coats. Which means multiple lettings. You'd be better off adding some of your blood to a paint if you're aiming to utilise the energy.



My energy is utilized. Speaking of blood amount - maybe I could just leave a palm image or something similar, without painting the entire body. The question still is: real paint from real blood - how? All the replies say that pure blood sucks. But I still believe it can work if prepared properly.

PRS SE Singlecut with Seymour Duncan Hot Rodded Humbucker Set
VOX AC30VR hybrid amplifier
Victim of chronical russian despare.
Last edited by wt0vremr at Sep 18, 2015,
#11
Years ago Ibanez did a DNA thing where they painted Jems with Vai's blood in it. Old idea.
My gastronomic rapacity knows no satiety.
#12
Try using Wudtone finish http://www.wudtone.com/2015/04/23/finishing-diykits/

I've completed a couple of guitars using this, it's relatively cheap (about £25-£28), and really easy to get a professional looking finish. It's basically a french polish type system.

I'm currently working on a body that I'm finishing in Cherry Flamenco Wudtone, which is fairly 'blood coloured'.
#14
Quote by crackerjack123
Years ago Ibanez did a DNA thing where they painted Jems with Vai's blood in it. Old idea.


Seen that guitar in person!! SWEET!
#15
maybe this will talk you out of this idea. KISS did this with ink for their comic books.