#1
so I am going to check out and hopefully purchase a marshall jvm 410hJS tomorrow and I have found a few used pedals I thought would go with it too - reverb, stereo chorus, delay.....but then I came across a line 6 m13 which sounds more efficient in that 1) it has multiple types of each of the effects I want and more and 2) it sounds like I would be able to save presets that also control the amps channel switching. This sounds perfect for me. Do I have the functionality of it correct?

I am not so interested in the distortion stuff as I think the amp will provide that well.
#2
It also sounds inferior to standalone pedals.


You have the choice between sound quality and efficiency
#3
It really depends what you want from the pedals.

If you are new to the world of effects and aren't really sure what you might want/need then a multi fx is a great way to get a feel for them.
You might decide down the road you prefer phaser over chorus, or find that you really like the harmonizer sounds.

I've only ever used the M5, but there are loads of great sounds in it, particularly for delays (taken from the DL4 i think?) and reverbs; lots of ambiance to be had.
Plus the M13 does have the benefit of multiple presets like you said, and a looper!

However, if you are already set on what you want; reverb, delay, and chorus, then you will probably get better sounds out of individual pedals. Did you have any particular pedals in mind?
edit: plus they may be more reliable. On the M5 i heard about some reliability issues, and if the M13 breaks that's your entire pedalboard gone!
Last edited by jaybals at Sep 18, 2015,
#4
As Jaybals said, it's really going to come down to what you think sounds better. Individual pedals could sound better but that by no means means that the M13 sounds terrible. I use an HD500 in a similar setup and im quite happy with it. The delays, reverbs and modulation effects I find very good and usable, but it's the ODs and distortions that can be lacking. But my amp handles all my dirt so that's pretty neglible to me.

I also like the convenience of midi switching and not having to do the "tap dance". One button changes my amp channel and effects, done. For me anyway, it far outweighs the tone benefit of individual pedals.
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#5
Quote by rickyj
It also sounds inferior to standalone pedals.


You have the choice between sound quality and efficiency


Um, no.

I'm a pedal junkie, to the point of having to go through a 12-step program to dial it back. I have two and a half of those flip-top bins filled with pedals. I can't visit the Wampler pedals site without twitching a bit, and the axeandyoushallreceive.com site makes me nuts. At an average of $200/pedal, those bins represent car money.

Here's the thing. You can sit in your bedroom and tell yourself this pedal is better than that pedal (even if they're nearly identical in sound) and that you have the best in sound quality.

You can do that right up until you play live. Use more than one pedal at a time and you find that changing them in the middle of a song is a tapdance at best, impossible at worst.

So you buy a switcher, or maybe a MIDI controller, and now you can turn banks of pedals on and off. Cool.

But then that "sound quality" thing rears its head and what you *really* want is to switch the pedals, but have this pedal's dials set at this point for the first part of the song, and then you want them to change to something else for the second part, and you want to change a different pedal's parameters at the same time. Your whole "sound quality" is right out the window.

Enter the MultiFX. You can completely change an array of internal pedals *and* their parameters with a single stomp, simply by setting them up ahead of time. You can, in fact, load in your entire set list full of parameters and then cycle through them. That's very efficient. But it also gives you better sound quality than if you'd had to leave the chorus on full bore for one song and then try to rotate it lower mid-song with your big toe for the next one, etc.

About the only time a multi-FX doesn't make more sense live for BOTH sound quality and efficiency is if you're in one of those originals bands that plays one thing all.night.long.
Last edited by dspellman at Sep 18, 2015,
#6
Quote by dspellman
Um, no.

...So you buy a switcher, or maybe a MIDI controller, and now you can turn banks of pedals on and off. Cool.

But then that "sound quality" thing rears its head and what you *really* want is to switch the pedals, but have this pedal's dials set at this point for the first part of the song, and then you want them to change to something else for the second part, and you want to change a different pedal's parameters at the same time. Your whole "sound quality" is right out the window.

Enter the MultiFX. You can completely change an array of internal pedals *and* their parameters with a single stomp, simply by setting them up ahead of time. You can, in fact, load in your entire set list full of parameters and then cycle through them. That's very efficient. But it also gives you better sound quality than if you'd had to leave the chorus on full bore for one song and then try to rotate it lower mid-song with your big toe for the next one, etc.

About the only time a multi-FX doesn't make more sense live for BOTH sound quality and efficiency is if you're in one of those originals bands that plays one thing all.night.long.

+1

BTW, I have a regular 410H and a 1960 4x12 cab. I've had it on maybe 4 times in the last 2 years. The last time I took it to a gig (at a club on Hollywood Blvd), the venue wouldn't let me plug it in; they made me go direct thru the MFX to the board.

it's not practical for home use, either. Yeah it has a master volume, but you can still hear it half a block away, even on the lowest volume it's capable of before going silent.

Lately at home I've just been playing the MFX thru small practice amps (with full range speakers) going thru the aux inputs on the amps. Even a crappy Marshall MG amp that sounds horrible thru the instrument input sounds great thru the aux input. Can't tell the difference from when I've wired the MG speaker directly to the 410H and played at low volumes (so as not to blow out the 30w speaker with the 100w amp )

I say go for the Axe FX II and don't look back!
#7
Guys has someone already tried this fuzz Triangle by TenTen? The site is tentendevices.com. It looks out of head but, is it a real fuzz?
#8
Quote by rickyj
It also sounds inferior to standalone pedals.


You have the choice between sound quality and efficiency


I wonder how well your ears can distinguish between a standalone digital delay pedal and the delay on a multi-fx unit?
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#9
Overdrives are what let you down mostly. I run an OD pedal in the loop of my GT-100; best of both worlds. Now the Gt-100's OD's aren't that bad but the difference between them an an actual analogue one are simply night and day.
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#10
TS - are you sure your amp can switch with that multifx unit?

I'd say multifx if you want to explore what works for you or you need a lot missing switching.

I used to dance a lot during gigs as I was lead guitarist and singer in a band, so I'd had to have my lead patch after I just sing a phrase. With pedasls that was usually lead boost+delay and sometimes other pedal like flange and chorus, with multifx it was just one switch.