#2
Guessing it's for some sort of cover situation?
Unless there's an intricate bass line that is different from the 6 string guitars, just play the root notes for the chords. You can improvise transitions or little runs.
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#3
Quote by ryanbwags
Guessing it's for some sort of cover situation?
Unless there's an intricate bass line that is different from the 6 string guitars, just play the root notes for the chords. You can improvise transitions or little runs.


It's an intricate bass line that keeps alternating between following the root notes and doing it's own thing, it's quite annoying

Thanks anyway
#4
you're gonna have to listen when you're playing live (because no one else, aside maybe the drummer, will be), so you may as well start by learning to figure out the parts by ear
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#5
Sticking to the root note is going nowhere, think of the chords and use them ie if the chord is say A minor you flatten the 3rd so you use A, C# and E.
C7 is usually a transition up to F.
Learn your chord structures, don't be a root note basher .
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#6
Quote by John Swift
if the chord is say A minor you flatten the 3rd so you use A, C# and E.


C# is a major third up from A. The minor third of A is C. Otherwise, good advice. Root notes work, but they are kind of boring and using chord tones to add some juice to your bass playing really adds to the groove and appeal of a song.
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#7
Quote by Burnkur
C# is a major third up from A. The minor third of A is C. Otherwise, good advice. Root notes work, but they are kind of boring and using chord tones to add some juice to your bass playing really adds to the groove and appeal of a song.

Quite correct silly mistake.
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#8
If there is a specific song you have in mind and it is a cover people will give you much more specific advice if you tell them what it is.

More generally there is a lot you can do to work from chords if you are trying to come up with a bass line.

First you need to know if it is a major or minor chord or a blues chord, written as D7, A7 etc(also called mixolydian or 7th)

You can throw in the occasional 5th and octave pretty much anywhere as they can fit in with pretty much any chord you are playing.

The next note I would add is the 7th, it's really easy to find as it is one or two frets below your root note. the only problem is that it is one fret below if you are playing a major chord and two below if it is minor or a blues chord. You need to know which you are playing.

The 3rd is a note which will add a lot of colour to your playing (sometimes too much) as it is the third which truly defines the major or minor sound. Learn to play the major and minor triad very early on. These are the root, third, fifth and for simple chords these are also the chord tones. More complex chords simply add extra tones. Learn your chord tones/triads as a box pattern so you can move the shape to whatever key/chord you are playing.

Next on the list to learn are the box patterns for the pentatonic, the five notes used most often in the scale. Again there are major and minor pentatonic patterns to learn but once learned you can use them anywhere on the neck. Most of those 'irritating' little runs that are hard to get are based on the minor pentatonic and there are very few songs that use much beyond the pentatonic.

Most bass players will approach a new song by playing root/fifth and nailing the rhythm and then building it up from there unless they already know the chord sequence from other songs.
#9
Another good thing to learn is the transition runs between notes, this make the music flow and playing much more interesting
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#10
I would say, learn about chord construction and chord functions if you want to figure out the chords the guitars are playing. Remember to use your ears when learning about them (so don't just learn the theory - learn the sound).

And the "blues chord" Phil is referring to is actually called the dominant 7th chord. It's the chord built on the 5th scale degree of the major scale (for example G7 in C major), but usually in blues every chord is a dom7.

Also, remember that there is absolutely nothing wrong with root notes. That's the most stable sound, and you definitely don't want to avoid them. Inversions are good, but using them all the time doesn't sound good. When you move from one chord to another, it is good to play some (different) notes in between, but it's not always necessary. When it comes to bass, your note choice is not always the most important thing. Remember to think about the rhythm too. You can do a lot with a simple note choice by just playing a good groove (well, of course it needs to fit the song you are playing).

A lot of this depends on the style you want to play.
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