#1
After I tried a Bugera 5-pin footswitch on my Peavey Stereo Chorus' 7-pin input. The chorus on the Peavey won't turn off so I figured I'd try a different footswitch. It started out fine for a minute, then began clicking the channel back and forth rapidly. And then the smoke came. What the heck did I do to my amp?! Thanks
#2
Oh I forgot to introduce myself! I enjoy jazz and I've been playing for about 10 years. But I don't know a thing about music theory lol
#3
your post doesn't make sense, so useful advice would be near impossible. like how can you use a 5 pin footswitch on a 7 pin input. and how could this ever cause an amp to meltdown (as the switching system should only effect a few relays). using my limited knowledge of amps i would guess your meltdown had nothing to do with the footswitch
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#5
Quote by gumbilicious
your post doesn't make sense, so useful advice would be near impossible. like how can you use a 5 pin footswitch on a 7 pin input. and how could this ever cause an amp to meltdown (as the switching system should only effect a few relays). using my limited knowledge of amps i would guess your meltdown had nothing to do with the footswitch

This.
Like how do you put a 5 pin connector on a 7 pin connector without breaking something?

As far as making the amp smoke?
Easy answer.
A lot of those foot switches work by shorting 2 or more of the pins together (Unless its MIDI).
Putting a 5 pin Bugera foot switch connector to a Peavey 7 pin connector, who knows what the hell its shorting together inside the amp?
You could be pushing a power signal through a relay's latching connections.
Or a power signal straight to ground, or any of a number of locations.
Probably not a good thing.

Like on my Vox, the Tremolo/Reverb switch cable has DC going through it (otherwise, how would it light up the LEDs in the foot switch?).
It uses a stereo cable.
One conductor for the tremolo, one conductor for the reverb, and one is ground.
If I were to wire it so that the tremolo trigger connected to the reverb trigger instead of ground, it would probably fvck something up.

Conclusion:
You fried something inside your amp.
Most likely a relay or 2.


Edit:
Wild, slightly educated guess here....
The Peavey expects a momentary connection to activate whatever its activating (Assumption).
The Bugera has latching switches (Another assumption).
So instead of getting a brief pulse of power to activate some relays, the Peavey is getting a constant stream of power making some relays switch back and forth over and over again.
Last edited by CodeMonk at Sep 22, 2015,
#6
The problem is you used a known-combustible product (Bugera) with your amp. Have a fire-extinguisher ready next time.
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#7
Once an amp takes up smoking you'll find that drinking, hookers and blow aren't far behind.

The rock lifestyle has laid more than one Peavey low...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#8
Quote by 1.8turbosteve
After I tried a Bugera 5-pin footswitch on my Peavey Stereo Chorus' 7-pin input.


"Doctor, doctor, my amp smokes when I do this."

"Don't do that."


Dude... WTF?


I think you're going to have to try Nicoderm at this point.
#10
Thanks all for the words of advice lol. The 5 pins lined up perfectly between the other 2 hahaha so I figured I'd give it a shot. I'm not too versed on how amps/footswitches work. All I know is I've tried a hundred combinations of random 2 button 1/4" footswitches with _____ amp. I've always had luck with them controlling the amp, regardless of what the buttons are labeled as. Both are 4 button switches so I thought it might be a similar process.

And believe it or not, I took the Peavey in to my local shop to get the Chorus switching problem fixed. The tech told me I was using the wrong footswitch with it. That it was supposed to be a 5-pin. Regardless of what the back of the amp looked like. (He wanted $140 to "fix" the footswitch and solder in new components on the amp) I said "Hey I've got a 5-pin 4 button footswitch at home, I'd rather try that first" So I paid the shop $35 for looking at my amp and took it home with me.

After the smoke I did some research and I absolutely have the correct footswitch for this amp...
#11
The icing on the cake was - after I talked to the shop owner about all this, he said a $10 refund was the best he could do. Now I got $10 and an even more busted amp. I'm just glad I didn't pay the guy $140 to break it further
#12
I get where you see that it might have worked and even given that you don't understand theory (which does not apply here), I would assume that the "square peg, round hole" concept would apply here!!!
Not something to chance, especially with electronics.
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EVH 5153, Mesa DR Tremoverb combo 2-2x12's
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#13
Quote by bobafettacheese
I get where you see that it might have worked and even given that you don't understand theory (which does not apply here), I would assume that the "square peg, round hole" concept would apply here!!!
Not something to chance, especially with electronics.


Actually, no.

A DIN 180° five-pin plug will fit into a seven- or eight-pin socket just fine...as he found out.

This is one of the known problems with the DIN round plug standard.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#14
Interesting, but just because it will technically fit doesn't mean it should, correct? Like using my previous analogy a circle peg will fit in a square hole but it doesn't go there. Just asking for clarity.
Gibson LP traditional and DC standard, PRS S2 Custom 24, MIA Standard Strat, Charvel So Cal Pro Mod, Schecter Banshee 7
EVH 5153, Mesa DR Tremoverb combo 2-2x12's
Line 6 M13
#15
Quote by bobafettacheese
Interesting, but just because it will technically fit doesn't mean it should, correct? Like using my previous analogy a circle peg will fit in a square hole but it doesn't go there. Just asking for clarity.


No, but if you're not electronically savvy, there's a certain logic in "if it fits it should be ok". And it should, as I've noted, it's a known problem in the standard. Visually, externally, the plugs appear exactly the same (because they are, the ONLY difference being the number of holes) and often not all the holes are used.


It's likely that if he rewired his 5 pin connector that his footswitch would work just fine. (assuming one of the "missing" pins isn't required for anything.)

There was a similar problem in the oilfield some years back, where a certain low-pressure fitting mated fine (visually) to a much higher pressure rated one. The problem came when the systems were pressured up and the lower pressure fitting/connector failed. (There were fatalities that occurred). The only way to solve the problem was to deprecate the low pressure fitting and standard entirely and disallow it's use on any drilling rig system.

I can think of a few others as regards firearms calibers as well.

Fortunately this standards failure comes at a much lower cost, but it's still a standards failure and not an ID10T error.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
Last edited by Arby911 at Sep 23, 2015,
#16
Since a lot of people can't understand how a 5 pin connector can't fit into a 7 hole input... Think of it being like how a two pronged AC adapter can fit into a three hole power socket. From an electrical point it doesn't actually work the same way, but from a "being physically able to stick things into things" perspective it's the same concept.

But I don't understand how it's so hard to understand how it can physically fit.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#17
Quote by 1.8turbosteve


And believe it or not, I took the Peavey in to my local shop to get the Chorus switching problem fixed. The tech told me I was using the wrong footswitch with it. That it was supposed to be a 5-pin. Regardless of what the back of the amp looked like. (He wanted $140 to "fix" the footswitch and solder in new components on the amp)


You now have a really good idea just how good your local shop tech is, don't you?

Holy Crap.
#18
The only difference is the bottom 2 pins.



“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#19
Quote by Arby911
No, but if you're not electronically savvy, there's a certain logic in "if it fits it should be ok".


A similar "logic" has led to new definitions of sexuality and deviant behavior (particularly where farm animals are involved).

Mostly the folks that employ that "certain logic" have IQs that don't reach room temperature in an igloo.
#20
Quote by Arby911
The only difference is the bottom 2 pins.





...And being able to count BEYOND the fingers of one hand.
#21
A quick look at the schematic seems to show that all 7 pins are used, so a 5 pin connector will not work, regardless of how it's wired.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#22
I got the amp for only $170 so nearly at the cost of the amp itself, I'd hope the tech would have gotten it to work for me eventually. But as cheap as I am I assumed that the 2 missing pins would just lead to a lack of a certain function or 2 for a short time, while I attempt to turn off the chorus semi-permanently. The Bugera footswitch, not surprisingly I guess, had 0 control over my amp
#23
Quote by Arby911
A quick look at the schematic seems to show that all 7 pins are used, so a 5 pin connector will not work, regardless of how it's wired.


Ah then I guess I just gave them more credit than they deserved
#24
Quote by theogonia777
Since a lot of people can't understand how a 5 pin connector can't fit into a 7 hole input... Think of it being like how a two pronged AC adapter can fit into a three hole power socket. From an electrical point it doesn't actually work the same way, but from a "being physically able to stick things into things" perspective it's the same concept.

But I don't understand how it's so hard to understand how it can physically fit.

I'm well versed with electronics and electronics hardware, connectors having been one of my NASA certifications.
But somehow I wasn't even thinking of a DIN connector.
I had a major brain fart there.
Even more so when you consider I have a Peavey Vypyr which uses, I forget exactly, a 7 pin or 9 pin DIN plug.
I was thinking of a D body style connector for some odd reason.


Quote by bobafettacheese
Interesting, but just because it will technically fit doesn't mean it should, correct? Like using my previous analogy a circle peg will fit in a square hole but it doesn't go there. Just asking for clarity.
In the "old days', IBM had the PS/2 port.
Same port and connectors used by the mouse and the keyboard.
I can't even guess how many calls I had to go out on because someone reversed them when plugging them in.


And without looking at the schematics, and being that I just woke up, I still stand by my original analysis.
Something inside the amp fried.

And as dspellman alluded to, your "amp tech" is a dumbass.

Geez, I can't believe how often often I hear people come in here and repeat what their so called "amp techs' said to them, and just face palm at the stupidity of said "amp techs".
Where the fvck are these so called techs coming from?
Last edited by CodeMonk at Sep 23, 2015,
#25
Quote by 1.8turbosteve
Ah then I guess I just gave them more credit than they deserved


No, when I said it wouldn't work, I meant that it couldn't control all the functions. It could of course be wired to control some portion thereof.

But it would be a ridiculous exercise, given that the correct footswitch can be purchased pretty reasonably.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin