#1
I've been playing for a year and two months. On the days i can't practice as much i tend to play somewhere between 4-5 hours. However, I usually practice around 6-9 hours a day. I feel like i am decent enough for a band, but i would like to get people's opinion who have been playing way longer than me. Am i at the stage where i can start a band? I was thinking about making some cards and passing them out to people around the music building at my college campus to start a cover band.
Last edited by J23L at Sep 22, 2015,
#2
It depends. If you want to play jazz improvisation or technical death metal at 300 bpm you probably aren't ready. If you're going to play four-chord pop songs, you definitely are.

Playing in a band is fun and very good for your musical development. You learn all kinds of things you'd never pick up as a bedroom guitarist. I'd say: go for it.
I make backing tracks for bass and guitar players. Check 'em out here.
#3
Quote by Burnkur
It depends. If you want to play jazz improvisation or technical death metal at 300 bpm you probably aren't ready. If you're going to play four-chord pop songs, you definitely are.

Playing in a band is fun and very good for your musical development. You learn all kinds of things you'd never pick up as a bedroom guitarist. I'd say: go for it.

I can already play the songs that i want to cover with little to no mistakes. Mostly Guns N Roses, Foo Fighters, Killswitch Engage, and some other bands that don't have hard songs. I wouldn't dare get on a stage and try to shred because I know i can't. I know my limits
#4
Quote by J23L
I can already play the songs that i want to cover with little to no mistakes. Mostly Guns N Roses, Foo Fighters, Killswitch Engage, and some other bands that don't have hard songs. I wouldn't dare get on a stage and try to shred because I know i can't. I know my limits


Sounds to me you are ready! Unless of course you have no interest in playing live, but I get the idea you're eager to hit the stage.

Oh, and it's great to know your limits. If you're playing live, you don't want to play something that pushes you beyond your technical or musical boundaries. That's what the all the practising is for. In a band setting you want to be able to deliver. So, if you can play those songs well, you'll do fine in a rock band :-)
I make backing tracks for bass and guitar players. Check 'em out here.
Last edited by Burnkur at Sep 22, 2015,
#5
It depends on how you've been practicing. You might discover when you join a band that your timing is slightly off, your dynamics might not be great, or a load of other things that are hard to pick up until you're actually creating music with other people.

Playing in a band really highlights these technical issues. Personally I think playing with other musicians is the best way to learn this stuff. Start off playing things that are slightly below what you perceive to be your skill floor.

I'll always recommend playing with other people! It's the best ever.
#6
I would go jam with people anyway.

The dynamics are totally different to playing on your own. You will develop more playing with other people.

How much do you feel you are actually progressing with 6-9 hours practice a day? I'm curious cause I couldn't play for that long.

How do you find improvising over backing tracks? Generic stuff not covers that is.
#7
Only way to really find out is go for it ... you won't regret it. Best thing that can happen is you discover weaknesses you didn't know about, which you then correct, plus you learn from others, and especially how to work as a unit (timing, feel, dynamics, sound levels ...) Net result ... you're a better musician.

Go for it.
#9
Quote by maidenmyguide
I would go jam with people anyway.

The dynamics are totally different to playing on your own. You will develop more playing with other people.

How much do you feel you are actually progressing with 6-9 hours practice a day? I'm curious cause I couldn't play for that long.

How do you find improvising over backing tracks? Generic stuff not covers that is.

For the most part i practice with a game called Rocksmith. I don't know if you've ever heard of it but it's a video game that teaches you how to play. There are tons of songs you can learn and there is a section where you can improvise over backing tracks. It's much better than learning songs on your own because it tells you when you're fucking up and it shows you on screen what you're doing. I practice 6-9 hours a day on this game and it has helped my accuracy, improved my timing, and helped me learn full songs in their entirety. After you've finished a song it will show you exactly how many notes you missed which tells you how good you are at the songs.


As far as improvising goes Im not anywhere near where i want to be, but im working on it. Rocksmith has helped me with this also because it teaches you how to do it. The complexities vary from a single box shape to switching scales and moving all around the fretboard. I just started delving into this and it's the most fun I've had with improvising.
Last edited by J23L at Sep 22, 2015,
#10
Quote by J23L
For the most part i practice with a game called Rocksmith. I don't know if you've ever heard of it but it's a video game that teaches you how to play. There are tons of songs you can learn and there is a section where you can improvise over backing tracks. It's much better than learning songs on your own because it tells you when you're fucking up and it shows you on screen what you're doing. I practice 6-9 hours a day on this game and it has helped my accuracy, improved my timing, and helped me learn full songs in their entirety. After you've finished a song it will show you exactly how many notes you missed which tells you how good you are at the songs.


As far as improvising goes Im not anywhere near where i want to be, but im working on it. Rocksmith has helped me with this also because it teaches you how to do it. The complexities vary from a single box shape to switching scales and moving all around the fretboard. I just started delving into this and it's the most fun I've had with improvising.


To answer your first question: go ahead and get a band. There's no harm to be done there. Even a bad band is good for you musical development.

And I'd suggest that you expand your practice routine to a bit more than just playing rocksmith. Yes, most of people here know what it is and most people think that it's useless. I couldn't tell, haven't tried it. But learning songs by ear without some program holding your hand is probably the best way to learn songs. I do have my doubts about rocksmith teaching improv efficiently though. Improvisation should be about your ears, not box shapes.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#11
Uh oh. I hope you have listened what you really play. My experience with Rocksmith are mixed. The input isn't really that precise and with my pc I've got this latency. I don't know about consoles though. Play the exercises and the songs without the game with a real amplifier and record them. If it sounds right, go for it, but do not trust blindly the game!
#12
I've got rocksmith but its not for me. Do you have an amp that you can just play through on your own?

As soon as you start playing with people you'll find the music changes and evolves in realtime unlike rocksmith which is locked into a tempo.

The other thing is that covering a song with people is totally different to playing along to the original. Be prepared for things to feel a bit different to start with.
#13
Just start playing with other musicians. It doesn't need to be an actual band. If you have any musician friends (they don't need to be great at playing their instruments, but also, don't be afraid if they are much better than you are - all good musicians I have met have been really supportive), ask them if they would like to jam with you. It doesn't need to be anything special. Just play the 12 bar blues for example. Or ask if they know some of the songs you know. If they don't, you can show them how to play the songs and then you can play the song together. They can also show you new songs.

If you have written any riffs/chord progressions, you can base your jam on them too.


I think you are ready to play with other musicians when you know the basic chords.
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#14
Quote by maidenmyguide
I've got rocksmith but its not for me. Do you have an amp that you can just play through on your own?

As soon as you start playing with people you'll find the music changes and evolves in realtime unlike rocksmith which is locked into a tempo.

The other thing is that covering a song with people is totally different to playing along to the original. Be prepared for things to feel a bit different to start with.

Yes, i have a real amp. I play with it regularly but not as much as i do with Rocksmith. Rocksmith has helped me improve much more than when i didn't have it and only played with my amp
#15
Quote by J23L
Yes, i have a real amp. I play with it regularly but not as much as i do with Rocksmith. Rocksmith has helped me improve much more than when i didn't have it and only played with my amp


While you yourself must decide what's best for you and I know that I'm no one to tell you how to do your stuff, it sounds like you simply don't know what to practice and how. I guess that Rocksmith is all fine when you're a complete beginner, but in the long run learning songs note for note from a game that's known to be inaccurate and laggy from time to time will not be an ideal form of practice. Just see how things develop yourself, and just have fun. Just be cautious not to form habits that you'll really regret a couple of years from now. In the end of the day, Rocksmith is just a game, and has about as much to do with real music as Guitar Hero. Of course you're learning songs while playing it, but it's just muscle memory and mimicry, no creativity included as far as I know.

But this is all derailing the thread. Just try to find a band, it'll be worth it. Even better if you do find musicians that are better than you and can maybe even teach you a bit on the side.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here