#1
Hey everyone, I have a marshall AS50R . Im a novice and I don't know much about amps.

My amp will play audio very faintly then It will like pop and when I turn it up way loud and the sound will be working again for about 5 mins then eventually cut back down to soft.

Any ideas?
I could make a video with a demo too if you think that would help.
#2
Sounds like a bad solder connection somewhere.
Maybe the input jacks.
Also check the wires connected to the speaker.

Video might help.
#3
Quote by CodeMonk
Sounds like a bad solder connection somewhere.
Maybe the input jacks.
Also check the wires connected to the speaker.

Video might help.



I have 2 guitar cable jacks and an white and red input and a mic in jack and they all fade/cut at the same spots. if that info helps at all.

Does this sound like a spendy fix? Guestimate ?
#4
Probably not input jacks then.
Check your speaker connections next.

No idea on cost.
That's a highly variable figure.
Amp Techs typically charge a minimum of $50 almost no matter what is wrong with it,
With tubes amps, 90% of time you have problems with tube amps, its the tubes.
But you have a Solid State amp. Harder to diagnose unless the tech has experience with that particular amp.
With some solid state amps, if you have a problem chances are someone else out there has had that problem too, sometimes due to a flaw in the design or a history of bad QC (Quality Control), or some other factor.

Although with many Solid State amps, a common failure point is the power amp chip, which generally cost about $5.00 for that part.

You could Google your amp symptoms and see if there is a pattern.
Don't forget to include amp name and model when doing that.

The again, it could be something as simple as a bad solder joint inside the amp.
I've seen a shitload of those, especially around wires.

Try doing just one connection at a time and see if the same thing happens.
If after testing all of them separately, and if you get no issues, then try again.
Start with the first connection do whatever you normally do with it.
If all goes well, add the next one, test, and keep going until you find one where the problem comes up.

That's Troubleshooting 101
And Troubleshooting can take time.
Believe me, I've spent more than half my life finding and fixing broken stuff, and I'm 55.

NOTE: Amps, especially with tube amps (and maybe some Solid State amps, depending on how they are designed), can have LETHAL VOLTAGES INSIDE THEM. SO IF YOU HAVE ANY QUALMS ABOUT WORKING WITH HIGH VOLTAGES, I SUGGEST HAVING AN AMP TECH LOOK AT IT. BUT THAT WELL COST YOU.
THERE ARE HOWEVER WAYS TO DRAIN THAT VOLTAGE BEFORE YOU GET YOUR HANDS IN THERE
Last edited by CodeMonk at Sep 23, 2015,
#5
Quote by CodeMonk
Probably not input jacks then.
Check your speaker connections next.

No idea on cost.
That's a highly variable figure.
Amp Techs typically charge a minimum of $50 almost no matter what is wrong with it,
With tubes amps, 90% of time you have problems with tube amps, its the tubes.
But you have a Solid State amp. Harder to diagnose unless the tech has experience with that particular amp.
With some solid state amps, if you have a problem chances are someone else out there has had that problem too, sometimes due to a flaw in the design or a history of bad QC (Quality Control), or some other factor.

Although with many Solid State amps, a common failure point is the power amp chip, which generally cost about $5.00 for that part.

You could Google your amp symptoms and see if there is a pattern.
Don't forget to include amp name and model when doing that.

The again, it could be something as simple as a bad solder joint inside the amp.
I've seen a shitload of those, especially around wires.

Try doing just one connection at a time and see if the same thing happens.
If after testing all of them separately, and if you get no issues, then try again.
Start with the first connection do whatever you normally do with it.
If all goes well, add the next one, test, and keep going until you find one where the problem comes up.

That's Troubleshooting 101
And Troubleshooting can take time.
Believe me, I've spent more than half my life finding and fixing broken stuff, and I'm 55.

NOTE: Amps, especially with tube amps (and maybe some Solid State amps, depending on how they are designed), can have LETHAL VOLTAGES INSIDE THEM. SO IF YOU HAVE ANY QUALMS ABOUT WORKING WITH HIGH VOLTAGES, I SUGGEST HAVING AN AMP TECH LOOK AT IT. BUT THAT WELL COST YOU.
THERE ARE HOWEVER WAYS TO DRAIN THAT VOLTAGE BEFORE YOU GET YOUR HANDS IN THERE



awesome information, Ive been googling a storm. Thanks!
#6
Please report with findings! I have a similar problem on a marshall solid state 30W combo, and it seems like I have to wiggle the volume knob to a sweet spot where it wont cut out and give me full sound... thanks in advance
#7
Quote by harleenraikmo
Please report with findings! I have a similar problem on a marshall solid state 30W combo, and it seems like I have to wiggle the volume knob to a sweet spot where it wont cut out and give me full sound... thanks in advance


Bad volume pot.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#8
May be cracked solder joints on the circuit board. Basically any of the jack or pot connections from the panel could be the cause. I've seen this a lot.