#1
I know its due to the knobs being overdriven, but can you still get something near it?
my question if can i actually naturally over drive my amps clean channel to the point where it starts breaking up? its a peavey vypyr 30 and really like this tone (yes you may have seen a thread with the same video before)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=110&v=xjkEh0Ou4vM
#2
Of course you can drive a solid state amp to the point of breakup.

The complaint in the late '60's was that it didn't sound as nice as a tube breakup. Then an engineer from Carvin came up with a circuit that sounded extremely tube-like. He didn't patent it, so it was available to everyone. The only problem was that a new source of tubes in the Soviet Bloc meant that manufacturers could go back to the cheaper manufacture of tube amps, so no one much heard solid state amps with the new circuit. For some 40 years, tube amp manufacturers have still been telling everyone that solid state still sounded like crap when overdriven, even though that wasn't the case if they were running the tubelike circuit.

At this point, modelers pretty much simulate tube amps (including breakup), and you can dial the volume on those wherever you like.
#3
you should be able to simulate that tone on your vypyr reasonably well. You can probably get the closest to that sound using the "twin" or "dlx" models assuming that they are modelling what I think they are modelling. Using a clean mode on your amp isn't necessarily the way to go when trying to recreate a sound just because that's how the original was done, though.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#4
Never tried that with a solid state amp itself (I was content with a fully clean tone), but pedals are also an option, there's probably plenty of overdrive and even subtler distortion pedals (I could get a similar result out of my TC Dark Matter with the gain at minimum) that could do the trick well, and still double as an angrier drive pedal if you feel like it.
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
There's no point in trying to convince a moron.
#5
I doubt it will be convincing tone but worth a try. Vypyr does heavier shred tones pretty well but struggles with more vintage stuff.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#6
You'll be able to get close, but if you're a tone hound chasing that specific tone you will never ever be satisfied with a solid state
Quote by yellowfrizbee
What does a girl have to do to get it in the butt thats all I ever wanted from you. Why, Ace? Why? I clean my asshole every night hoping and wishing and it never happens.
Bitches be Crazy.

▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۩ஜ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬
#7
Quote by Blompcube
you should be able to simulate that tone on your vypyr reasonably well. You can probably get the closest to that sound using the "twin" or "dlx" models assuming that they are modelling what I think they are modelling. Using a clean mode on your amp isn't necessarily the way to go when trying to recreate a sound just because that's how the original was done, though.

so do you think i should either one of those amps on the clean(green) channel or on the distorted channel(red), or green channel with a stompbox like the tube screamer
#8
Quote by GuitarNewbee
so do you think i should either one of those amps on the clean(green) channel or on the distorted channel(red), or green channel with a stompbox like the tube screamer

The best thing to do would be to try all of those things and see which one you think sounds the closest. That tone sounds to me like a cranked deluxe which I presume the dlx model is based on (could be completely wrong - haven't really used vypyrs very much). But that doesn't necessarily mean that the dlx amp model on the clean channel would be the best thing to use.

Bare in mind that replicating recorded tones with 100% accuracy is more or less impossible as you have things like the mic position, type, model etc, the mic preamp, the mixing board and its EQ, any FX that might've been added in post production, and the environment it was recorded in, to add to the equation. To put things into perspective - I can't even faithfully reproduce most of my recorded guitar tones in a live setting using the same guitar and amp I used to record them in the first place
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#9
Quote by Blompcube
The best thing to do would be to try all of those things and see which one you think sounds the closest. That tone sounds to me like a cranked deluxe which I presume the dlx model is based on (could be completely wrong - haven't really used vypyrs very much). But that doesn't necessarily mean that the dlx amp model on the clean channel would be the best thing to use.

Bare in mind that replicating recorded tones with 100% accuracy is more or less impossible as you have things like the mic position, type, model etc, the mic preamp, the mixing board and its EQ, any FX that might've been added in post production, and the environment it was recorded in, to add to the equation. To put things into perspective - I can't even faithfully reproduce most of my recorded guitar tones in a live setting using the same guitar and amp I used to record them in the first place

i see what you mean but what i meant was how would i get close, i know its almost impossible to get close to the official audio, but i'm talking about tones like these, like in this video which is live. If you listen to the non live version, you can tell theres a difference
but thanks for the thought, i'll try it out for sure
#10
Quote by GuitarNewbee
i see what you mean but what i meant was how would i get close, i know its almost impossible to get close to the official audio, but i'm talking about tones like these, like in this video which is live. If you listen to the non live version, you can tell theres a difference
but thanks for the thought, i'll try it out for sure


experiment. try different amp models and see what comes the closest to what you want. when i record i often use a Line 6 POD and that's what i do to get the tones i want. sure sometimes it ends up being a compromise but you live with it. i would try a fender model with either some preamp gain or an overdrive (or maybe both). you may also want to look at what other models you have available and try them (skip the high gain ones).
#11
What kind of a guitar do you have? If you are after that kind of a twangy tone (like the rhythm guitar), you want single coils. I think the Telecaster is a pretty important part of that particular tone. It wouldn't sound the same with humbuckers.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#12
Quote by MaggaraMarine
What kind of a guitar do you have? If you are after that kind of a twangy tone (like the rhythm guitar), you want single coils. I think the Telecaster is a pretty important part of that particular tone. It wouldn't sound the same with humbuckers.


I haven't watched that video in a long time, but I think there's a Gibson LP Special (P90's) at work in there somewhere that might have something to do with the sound, too, particularly in the beginning and middle of the record.
#13
What guitar depends on which sound you want.

The first lead sounds to me a lot like a Telecaster or Strat on the bridge pickup, with a Fender amp cranked to around 7 or 8 maybe maxed, so it breaks up a bit. The second lead sounds more like a Les Paul through a tube amp set for a tone that's not as bright.

You can get both from a solid state amp, or reasonably close. I'm not familiar with that amp, but someone said a Fender amp setting. Go far that, Twin Reverb probably, or Super Reverb if it has it, set the channel gain on about 7 or so and master volume to whatever level you need for the volume level you want.

That's where I set a Peavey Pacer I played a lot in the 80's, and several master volume tube amps I've played. Channel volume around 7, master to volume level I want. That gets it just into breakup territory without going into outright distortion, volume level is controlled by Master volume knob.

For that sound, I'd say tone settings close to this

Bass - 4 or 5, maybe 6
Mids - 4
Treble - 6 to 7

Bright switch on if it has it.

You might also get a sound pretty close to that if it has a preset for a Vox AC30. Similar gain and tone settings.

If you're looking for closer to the sound of the 2nd lead, you can tell where they switch guitar players, go for a Marshall amp preset, more mids and less treble, a bit higher gain.

For the intro guitar part, same tone as first lead but back off volume on guitar just a little. That will cut a little treble and still keep a lot of the breakup.

My Super Reverb will peg that song with no problems, all I have to do is set the treble a little hotter than I normally do and crank the volume to about 6 - 7 or so. Same thing you're looking for by setting the channel gain to 7.

OK so I watch the video and I see the Les Paul is first....go figure...can't see what amps they're using, but you can hear the difference in the two guitars, they would still sound different through the same amp. I always use my strat for that song...
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
Last edited by Paleo Pete at Sep 29, 2015,