#1
There's a song that I'm analyzing. My music theory skills are pretty weak so I have a few questions.

It's in the key of C (I believe) but I notice the song essentially changing keys in the middle of a solo when I notice an out-of-place yet nice sounding Bb note and then Eb later and more of these used throughout. The "feel" of the song is essentially F (played over the V, Fmaj chord) but the key clearly isn't F.

I looked up dominant keys and how they are used often during key changes in songs. The notes in the solo seem to fit in Bb (which doesn't make sense), yet the dominant key for Bb IS Fmaj so maybe that's the connection.

Can someone explain to me a bit why this all "works"?
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Taylor Big Baby
Agile 3100 CSB
Peavey classic 30/112
Okko Dominator, Big muff pi, cs3, dd3, ch1, ts9, ad9, classic wah
#2
Jet, we need a rule where song help requires a link or at least a song name.

OP, link the song.
#3
Quote by NeoMvsEu
Jet, we need a rule where song help requires a link or at least a song name.

OP, link the song.


Sorry about that

Been tabbing out this solo by ear. Solo about mid way through
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hMY2kZ4YabY

Here's what I got for the solo sofar

this is a post. there are many like it but this one is mine

=======================

Taylor Big Baby
Agile 3100 CSB
Peavey classic 30/112
Okko Dominator, Big muff pi, cs3, dd3, ch1, ts9, ad9, classic wah
Last edited by mlfarrell at Sep 24, 2015,
#4
No key changes here. It's called mixing major and minor. He's using the C minor pentatonic scale in one lick (and also some accidentals in other licks). Playing Cm pent over C major progression is not rare. It gives you that kind of a bluesy sound.

Also, F major is not the V chord of C major, it's the IV chord, because F is the fourth note of the C major scale.

The song is definitely in C major all the time. It mostly uses just three chords (C, F and G). It also uses Am and D7 (which is a non-diatonic chord) in the bridge.


Why you may feel like the "feel" of the song is on F is because the verse starts on F major chord. But the home chord is C major, which becomes even more clear as the song progresses.


When it comes to key, don't look at which scales the solo uses. Look at the chord progression. Listen to it. Just because the solo uses notes outside of the key scale doesn't mean there's a key change. The key is defined by harmony, not melody.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Sep 24, 2015,
#5
It's common in blues to play the b3 and the b7 in a major key. No key change here, he just starts using notes from the C minor pentatonic scale. You can find this in tons of blues songs but Yellow Ledbetter springs to mind as being a similarly structured solo to this one.
#6
thanks a ton guys. This'll def give me a better understanding.
this is a post. there are many like it but this one is mine

=======================

Taylor Big Baby
Agile 3100 CSB
Peavey classic 30/112
Okko Dominator, Big muff pi, cs3, dd3, ch1, ts9, ad9, classic wah