#1
So I recently bought an Zoom G1on Multi effect pedal. It didn't came with an AC adapter, so I tried to use my power supply. It worked .

So whatsup with that? On the website it is stated that you need an 9volt Ac adapter with an output of 500mA. My supply gives an output of 50mA and it just works...

Does this actually affects the tone of the pedal or anything? Is it really necessary to buy an AC with right amount of output?

Would really appreciate an answer.
#2
What power supply are you using that only has 50mah?


I would expect at least 200 mah available.


ZOOM always overstate the current requirements of the unit.

If it runs off 4 AA batteries I wonder how much it draws from a 9V adapter.

Anyway, even if your adapter has only 50 mah, doesn't mean it won't attempt to supply more but you'll probably burn it up in time, maybe not immediately but eventually.
#3
I should have been more clear on the power supply, my bad.
Im using a Harley Benton PowerPlant Junior. the specs:

Harley Benton PowerPlant Junior, power supply for FX pedals, 5 x isolated 9V DC outputs delivering 120mA max and 50mA min each.

The pedal can run on 4 aa batteries and even on usb bus power.
#4
Quote by BlazeBee
I should have been more clear on the power supply, my bad.
Im using a Harley Benton PowerPlant Junior. the specs:

Harley Benton PowerPlant Junior, power supply for FX pedals, 5 x isolated 9V DC outputs delivering 120mA max and 50mA min each.

The pedal can run on 4 aa batteries and even on usb bus power.



That means there's a dc stepdown buck converter in the zoom unit to bring 9v down to 6v or even less. Technically your adapter is packing more milliamps for the zoom unit if it's switching the voltage down from 9v to whatever it is truly using internally.

Anyway, Zoom probably overstate the requirements of the G1on because they want a safe current margin for it. But if not, given time, your powerplant's transformer in that particular 9v socket will go.
#6
Supplies will often deliver more than spec. And they may get hot as well. Devices often state a requirement higher than they need.