#1
I own a cheapish acoustic guitar, a Fender CD-60 mahogany to be precise, and I've run into a slight problem. You know, I also own two cats, and the other one isn't as agile and slim as he thinks he is. Here's the result:









It's a thin crack, but I think it reaches the wood below the finish. I've loosened the strings a bit for now to avoid pulling it apart more. The guitar fell flat on it's face so I should be grateful to still have it in one piece.

The guitar costs about 200 bucks new, depending on where you buy it around here. The question is, would the repair be cheaper than a completely new acoustic? I know you can't predict the prices around here, but any advice on the matter is appreciated. I'll take it to the store, but I can't do it today (sunday duh) so I thought I'd scout ahead a little and see what you guys think. If I'm lucky, there's actually very little damage to the wood itself.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
Last edited by Kevätuhri at Sep 27, 2015,
#2
get some good wood glue, I use Franklin Tite-bond and get your self 2-3 clamps.

remove all hardware and the strings from the head stock

put a liberal amount of glue on both sides of the break.

align the best you can and clamp. use some spacer blocks and c loth if you don't have clamps with rubber on them. C clamps work just fine, but I typically use the Irwin quick locking type.

Let it set for at least 24 hours and then you should be good to go.
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#3
Quote by Robbgnarly
get some good wood glue, I use Franklin Tite-bond and get your self 2-3 clamps.

remove all hardware and the strings from the head stock

put a liberal amount of glue on both sides of the break.

align the best you can and clamp. use some spacer blocks and c loth if you don't have clamps with rubber on them. C clamps work just fine, but I typically use the Irwin quick locking type.

Let it set for at least 24 hours and then you should be good to go.


Cool. Sounds easier than I thought, I did think about doing it myself but I have very little experience. Thanks, I'll see what all of that costs around here.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#5
Quote by sfx
You need to break the piece off cleanly first...


I'll see about that, I'm not sure if I'm going to do this myself or not. I don't exactly trust my self in this field
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#6
Quote by Kevätuhri
I own a cheapish acoustic guitar, a Fender CD-60 mahogany to be precise, and I've run into a slight problem. You know, I also own two cats, and the other one isn't as agile and slim as he thinks he is. Here's the result:

It's a thin crack, but I think it reaches the wood below the finish.


Without question, the headstock is broken. It's worth taking to a tech for repair, but find a really good tech who's done this before. If the tech isn't experienced, it's probably a better choice to find a new acoustic.

I have three athletic cats, and they're one of the reasons my guitars live in their cases when I'm not playing them, and never on hangers or stands.
#7
Quote by sfx
You need to break the piece off cleanly first...


Noooooooooooooo.....

Check with StewMac -- you can *inject* glue into the crack. You may need to slightly expand it first, but NEVER ever break the whole thing off if you don't have to.
#8
Quote by dspellman
Noooooooooooooo.....

Check with StewMac -- you can *inject* glue into the crack. You may need to slightly expand it first, but NEVER ever break the whole thing off if you don't have to.


That's why I said "I'll see about that" and not "I'll go do it now"

And that acoustic is the only instrument I own that doesn't have a case, so of course the furball decided to jump on that particular guitar. It's my "living room guitar" you know, I keep it on a stand in the living room and sometimes sit on the couch and play. So luckily it's probably my most expendable one. Still would like to repair it of course.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#9
Quote by Kevätuhri
That's why I said "I'll see about that" and not "I'll go do it now"

And that acoustic is the only instrument I own that doesn't have a case, so of course the furball decided to jump on that particular guitar. It's my "living room guitar" you know, I keep it on a stand in the living room and sometimes sit on the couch and play. So luckily it's probably my most expendable one. Still would like to repair it of course.


Friend of mine's cat jumped on the right-side (treble) bout of an acoustic on a wall hanger. The off-balance guitar spun on the wall, flipped itself off the hanger, hit a chair with the headstock, nailed the side of the guitar with an end table and hit the corner of a glass-topped coffee table with the back. The headstock was broken very much like yours, there was about a 3" x 1" dent (about 1/2" depth) on the side, and a very nice triangular hole punched into the back just about centerline. $425 repair. The owner missed the event, but his wife and I caught it and just looked at each other and went, "Whoa!"

Cats view everything as either "terrain features" or potential cat toys. I've tried to explain logos to them and point out high-value items as opposed to junque, but they just don't get it.
#10
Quote by dspellman

Cats view everything as either "terrain features" or potential cat toys.


Except their actual cat toys.

And I hope the repair won't cost too much, as I don't have huge sums of money to dish out. That's why the self repair sound so good.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#11
I agree with dspellman, don't finish breaking it. Much more difficult to align properly. Usually you have to sand spots down to get it to line up smooth. I've done gun stocks and guitars, a baseball bat, boat paddles, chair and table legs, a ladder...

If it were me, I'd leave strings on under tension so it opens the crack, put some wood glue in a hypodermic and shoot it inside, then remove the strings, clamp and let it sit overnight.

Yeah it's taking a chance, but if it's not already broken off with tension on the strings, it will probably hold long enough to glue it. You might have to add a bit of water to the glue to thin it enough to use with a hypodermic, the glue is pretty thick. I got one from a vet to use for that, just explained what I wanted. They thought I was crazy but gave me one. The typical insulin type won't work, the needle is way too fine for glue.

Oh yeah, almost forgot, clean off any excess glue you squeeze out when clamping with a damp cloth. After it dries it's an ugly mess and difficult to remove...get it while it's still wet with a wet cloth.

Use something for padding when you clamp it, rubber or leather, leave it a full 24 hours.

I use Titebond too, great stuff. It cures stronger than the wood, it will actually rip chunks of wood out if you try to break it loose afterward. Or break in another spot, the glue really is stronger than the wood, as they say on the label.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
Last edited by Paleo Pete at Sep 29, 2015,
#13
All of that makes perfect sense, thank you a lot. I'll have to see if that titebond is being sold around here.

And It's a really thin crack so I think it'll align fine, there's no material missing or anything. I poked around a bit and I'm sure it's deep enough to go pretty far into the wood, at least there's no way it's just in the gloss finish. But I might go through with trying this myself, it is my cheapest guitar so it's the perfect guinea pig. Being able to repair minor damage myself would be a valuable skill.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#14
Quote by Kevätuhri
All of that makes perfect sense, thank you a lot. I'll have to see if that titebond is being sold around here.

And It's a really thin crack so I think it'll align fine, there's no material missing or anything. I poked around a bit and I'm sure it's deep enough to go pretty far into the wood, at least there's no way it's just in the gloss finish. But I might go through with trying this myself, it is my cheapest guitar so it's the perfect guinea pig. Being able to repair minor damage myself would be a valuable skill.



if you are in finland: hardware stores in finland

if you can't find Titebond original then Elmer's carpenter's "wood glue" will work (the yellow stuff not the white) Gorilla wood glue. (not the white stuff)

Don't use any glues made for children, or "art's and crafts" glues. they are weak and creep over time. Stick with aliphatic resin (AR) or PVA wood glues made for real wood working.
Last edited by ad_works at Sep 29, 2015,
#15
Quote by ad_works
if you are in finland: hardware stores in finland

if you can't find Titebond original then Elmer's carpenter's "wood glue" will work (the yellow stuff not the white) Gorilla wood glue. (not the white stuff)

Don't use any glues made for children, or "art's and crafts" glues. they are weak and creep over time. Stick with aliphatic resin (AR) or PVA wood glues made for real wood working.


Thanks

Seems like I can buy a bottle of Titebond original (240 ml) for about ten bucks here which isn't too bad.

But then I'll also need the syringe or something that gets the same result. With clamps included, it still shouldn't be too much.

I guess I can sand the gloss finish away pretty safely? I don't like gloss necks anyway so now I have a good excuse to get rid of it.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#16
Quote by Kevätuhri
Thanks

Seems like I can buy a bottle of Titebond original (240 ml) for about ten bucks here which isn't too bad.

But then I'll also need the syringe or something that gets the same result. With clamps included, it still shouldn't be too much.

I guess I can sand the gloss finish away pretty safely? I don't like gloss necks anyway so now I have a good excuse to get rid of it.


you can if you want, but you don't really need a syringe. you can get the glue to wick into the crack by squirting in a small amount at the open end and then "working" the crack open and closed. this action will draw the glue into pretty much 99% of the crack. clamp it up, wipe off squeeze out with a slightly damp non- shredding cloth, and let it sit untouched for at least 24 hours.

if you're not going down to raw wood, de-glossing your neck is pretty easy. i suggest silicon carbide (the black/grey stuff) sandpaper. depending upon how thick the finish is, maybe start out at say 400p or so and move up the numbers to say 1000p. you'll have to experiment a little here to get what you want.

i also suggest something thin and foamy or rubbery -maybe a piece of ******* sponge, to back up the sandpaper with. this way you'll get a more consistent result as your fingers can put imperfections into the work sometimes if you're not careful.


p.s see those asterisks up there? the word i wanted was "k i t c h e n". the bb software thinks "k i t c h e n" is a bad word. wtf?
Last edited by ad_works at Sep 29, 2015,
#17
Thanks again.

And there it is, the infamous curse of the k i t c h e n. This is the first time I've seen it with my own eyes.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#18
I've seen it before when I tried to tell someone how to pot a pickup using Gulfwax k i t c h e n wax...HUH??? Since when is that not an allowed word? Go figure...

Anyway, I use 0000 steel wool if I have to smooth a neck, it works great and if you're worried about the pickups a little clear packing tape over them cures that problem. Nothing else I Know of works as well. Since this is an acoustic, pickups are not a problem, no reason steel wool won't work perfect and it leaves a really smooth finish. I've done a couple of guitars, 5 minutes and they feel like silk...use only the 0000 grade, the finest, any other steel wool is too coarse.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#20
A dramatic tale indeed. I wonder if the word will ever be allowed back in this realm?

And the smoother the neck the better. I might try different materials and see what works best.

And I just realized that gloss finishes just don't work for me. I visited the guitar shop the other day and tried out a cheapish strat copy that had intonation issues, but it had a completely matte daphne blue finish with slight relicing and it felt so great. If I'm ever going to buy a custom guitar, it's going to have a matte finish, I've already made up my mind in that.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here