#1
I took up guitar 2 years ago..I bought a Yamaha fg700s..I am older guy an just want to strum songs...No interest in playing lead or picking etc..
What is a good sounding Strumming guitar in the range of $300-$700.00 ??
Not trying to promote my page,i get few visitors,but here is an idea of what i have an what i strum...When i am in my bedroom the guitar doesn't sound near as good as when im in this room with brick walls etc.Thanks for any advice..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8BEKoiax0tQ
#2
I think you need something that sounds like a big Gibson for that kind of strumming, though I don't know what to suggest. - Maybe an Epi EJ-200 or the like.

You could also try altering your strumming technique a bit so that it is heavier on the bass and lighter on the treble. - It sounds a bit jangly with the heavy emphasis on the trebles.
#3
Not sure what jangly means...Altering strumming technique. Do you mean strumming the top 4 strings for instance alternately etc ?? and for instance.Thanks for your help either way
#4
I do kinda understand that too much high strings..treble in all my playing,if thats what u mean..Not sure.Here to learn as much as possible.
#6
I think you have to put more emphasis on the bass strings, lighter touch on the treble. I'm not a strummer, so I can't offer much more than that, maybe someone else can. - It reminds me of a lady who used to play at our local folk club, a great singer but she mostly strummed the treble strings, and it sounded too bright and trebly. Don't get too discouraged, because there's a lot of technology goes into pro recording, including microphone placement and/or EQing pickups. It might not be half so impressive live.
#7
yamahas are good strummers actually. you could get another if you want.

other choices would be seagul original s6, epi masterbuilt aj45me, blueridge bg40 or br40 to name a few.

bit of a coin toss on a j200 style jumbo. they can either be really comfortable to play or tweak your right shoulder in a hurry due to their lower bout size and depth.

there are three guitar centers in Kentucky: Louisville, Florence, and Lexington.

check em' out.
Last edited by ad_works at Sep 28, 2015,
#8
Quote by Kapkrusdader
Not sure what jangly means...Altering strumming technique. Do you mean strumming the top 4 strings for instance alternately etc ?? and for instance.Thanks for your help either way
My guitar teacher somewhere in the dark and distant past, told me to stay off the top two strings, or at least lighten up hitting them while in full strum. So, I guess that means you have to flare your swing away from the guitar slightly on the down stroke. You want to ascribe an arc away from the guitar, instead of a straight line.

The electric guys are constantly talking about "cross picking". I'm going to give you an example of "cross strumming". Listen to The Rolling Stones, "Honky Tonk Women". The beginning rhythm lick is played entirely on a G major barre chord. But, first there are two down strokes, (dah, dah), then an upstroke, (squawk), rinse & repeat. It almost sounds like 2 different chords.

I've said this many times, (although I have no idea if anybody has taken me up on it), "if you want to learn to play rhythm guitar, buy a copy of "Tommy" by the Who, and practice along with it cover to cover".

Pete Townshend is one of the best rhythm guitarists to ever hit rock, bar none.

In that era of rock, "power chords" weren't en vogue, nor were they necessary, as you didn't have the extreme levels of "gain", (alias "distortion"), that you do today. Those big old tube amps simple got turned up to 11 or 12, and that was that.

Another thing which is interesting about early Who, is the fact it all translates perfectly to acoustic guitar. Legend has it, Townshend wrote all of "Tommy" on a Gibson SJ-200.

Which brings us back to the Epiphone EJ-200-SCE, which is almost dead on copy of the Gibson. The EJ-200, has a stiff sitka spruce top, and a maple body, although it is laminated, an argument for later, much later. Point being, you can bang the crap out of it and it doesn't "compress", nor does the body "load up in the bass", because of the waist-ed design.

FWIW, maple doesn't have the "overtones" or "harmonic complexity" of other tonewoods like rosewood or mahogany. It is very precise sounding, but realy needs a jumbo body to give of its best. The old Guild maple 12 strings are "living proof" of that, and they're regarded by many as the best 12 strings ever made. (Except for those brainwashed by Bob Taylor, another long story for later).

It is a humongous guitar. It don't find that it hurts my shoulder but, while sitting, I tend to rest my bicep on the lower bout, and swing from the elbow. Your results may vary.

The fact the EJ-200 is electrified, may benefit you by virtue of the fact you can plug in, and restore room ambiance via reverb and/or delay in the amp, and not have to worry about dead rooms.

BTW, the best place I found to place for acoustics, is in an empty, cinder block, gas station service bay. But face it, nobody's going to let you practice there, or at the corner Gothic cathedral whenever you want...

So, as you can tell, my vote goes for the Epiphone. It has a ton of solid bass, yet isn't boomy like some dreadnoughts. It's not so strident that it's going to interfere with your singing.

With your deep voice, the last thing in the world you need is a Taylor anything... (And yeah, there's a backstory there, but for later, much later).
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 28, 2015,
#9
indeed, the J200's can take a beating.

the epi version unfortunately doesn't compare tonewise to the gibson (imo) but on the other hand, $300 to $700 won't put the op in the Gibson neighborhood even used unless it has serious problems -the repair of which will cost a bunch.

give the EJ200 a try and see if you are comfortable with it. go to the guitar store and try some guitars on.

i had a J200 with a giant pink stain on it from a cowboy's shirt put on layaway once. it was very comfortable at first until my tacoma dm9 sprung my shoulder out. i transferred the layaway over to a awesome 1936 kalamzoo kg 14 instead.
Last edited by ad_works at Sep 28, 2015,
#10
Quote by ad_works
indeed, the J200's can take a beating.

the epi version unfortunately doesn't compare tonewise to the gibson (imo) but on the other hand, $300 to $700 won't put the op in the Gibson neighborhood even used unless it has serious problems -the repair of which will cost a bunch.
Unfortunately, (or perhaps fortunately), we're not posting at AGF, so all this might go under appreciated.

Taken at face value, the only people who are going to tell you, "the Gibson is ten times better than the Epiphone", are those who have spent the $4000,00 necessary to own the SJ-200 in the first place.

By normal reasoning 4000/400 equals 10 times as good, a product which can only be successfully reached by reading the name on the head stock, and then sniffing the sound hole. Better yes, ten times better, that's a bit of a stretch.

Anyhow, everybody who is a devout Martin D-28 owner will quickly tell you the J-200 is a slug anyway. So, we're left in a quandary here.....

I have conversed with people who own both guitars, who have told me they gig with the EJ, and play the J-200 at home, or at "civilized gigs", where there is little to no risk to the expensive guitar.

Let's watch as a J-200 (Townshend Signature model, no doubt, (now out of production)), meets its untimely demise:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u8TweRcNWpA
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 28, 2015,
#11
well, ok. no guitar can take a "townsend" and survive. at least the neck made it.

Taken at face value, the only people who are going to tell you, "the Gibson is ten times better than the Epiphone", are those who have spent the $4000,00 necessary to own the SJ-200 in the first place.

i don't know about 10X better, but it only takes a few minutes at the guitar hole to suss out that there is ~something different~ about the SJ200 vs. the EJ200. that difference will be detected by those with decent ears and an open mind. the value of that difference is up to them -and which is subjective of course, but there may be a general consensus to which instrument produces a more "pleasing" tone.
Last edited by ad_works at Sep 28, 2015,
#12
Quote by Captaincranky
My guitar teacher somewhere in the dark and distant past, told me to stay off the top two strings, or at least lighten up hitting them while in full strum. So, I guess that means you have to flare your swing away from the guitar slightly on the down stroke. You want to ascribe an arc away from the guitar, instead of a straight line.


So strum away from the top 2 (5-6th string) or strum away from the bottom 2 (1-2) strings..I am getting confused on whether i need more treble or more bass...
I do read alot online ,not just being lazy trying to figure things out. But it can all get confusing.Thanks
#13
Quote by Kapkrusdader
So strum away from the top 2 (5-6th string) or strum away from the bottom 2 (1-2) strings..I am getting confused on whether i need more treble or more bass...
I do read alot online ,not just being lazy trying to figure things out. But it can all get confusing.Thanks
OK, the "top 2 strings", are the treble strings e-1 & B-2.

But, they're physically toward the floor, or bottom, if you will. Musically speaking we call the strings which are higher in pitch "top", and lower in pitch "bottom", regardless of their physical location.

The short answer is, more often than not, you're going to want to strum AWAY from the e-1 & B-2 strings. In other words feather your stroke outward as your arm gets lower toward the floor.

Staccato strumming (in reverse) from the high strings to the low strings, (in other words pulling up, then releasing and muting the guitar), used to be called "chinking", and you'll hear a lot of it in old "doo-wop" music of the 50's and 60's. In fact, guitarists who had the best "chinks" were often sought out for studio sessions.

The rest of us are normally relegated to avoiding those two top strings.
#14
Quote by ad_works
well, ok. no guitar can take a "townsend" and survive. at least the neck made it.
Although, I do think his SG's and Les Pauls tended to put up a better fight..

Quote by ad_works
i don't know about 10X better, but it only takes a few minutes at the guitar hole to suss out that there is ~something different~ about the SJ200 vs. the EJ200. that difference will be detected by those with decent ears and an open mind. the value of that difference is up to them -and which is subjective of course, but there may be a general consensus to which instrument produces a more "pleasing" tone.
Well, I've seen so many comparison videos on the web which try to dispute Gibson's superiority to the equivalent Epiphone, my head is spinning and I don't know what to think.Then too, you're dealing with, (my), "old ears" here.

What, (to me), makes one acoustic guitar superior to another is plugging it in. I know that will be disputed heavily for years to come. (That's why I said it ).
#15
Quote by Captaincranky



Anyhow, everybody who is a devout Martin D-28 owner will quickly tell you the J-200 is a slug anyway.



True that. My small experience with Gibson J-200s, and what I have read, is that most of them are indeed slugs (which doesn't disqualify them from being very good for strumming), but the odd one, mostly early versions is absolutely stellar. It is the latter kind that gives them their reputation. FWIW, I think that the square-shouldered Gibson/Epiphone dreads would also be worth a look for strumming - the ones I have tried have had a thick percussive tone.

I would need to do my own comparisons to be convinced that yer average G J-200 is better than yer average E J-200. I don't think lam b&s makes much difference, especially in that kind of guitar.
#17
could be technique or perhaps you need a guitar with a more focused sound perhaps.

the room with the brick walls isn't going to absorb as much sound as your bedroom - it will reflect more out. so a guitar with a more focused sound or "more" tone may help here. or maybe a tone port would help get more of the sound directly from the guitar to you, the player, which is what it sounds to me like you are missing.

the guild GAD series has some of the best guitars in the $700 and under range in some ways. they're all solid, and that alone is going to probably help with your tone, gloss finish and come with a hardshell case. the epiphone masterbilt series are all solid, so worth a try,. and also look into include blueridge and recording king, both of which make nice all solid guitars in your price range.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
Last edited by patticake at Sep 28, 2015,
#18
Quote by patticake
could be technique or perhaps you need a guitar with a more focused sound perhaps.

the guild GAD series has some of the best guitars in the $700 and under range in some ways. they're all solid, and that alone is going to probably help with your tone, gloss finish and come with a hardshell case. the epiphone masterbilt series are all solid, so worth a try,. and also look into include blueridge and recording king, both of which make nice all solid guitars in your price range.
Patti, Sweetwater just blew out the remainder of the GAD series. GAD's have been replaced by the "Westerly" series. And, (I think), the prices are up a bit.

It's a shame we didn't have the conversation a couple of weeks ago, as those Guilds were flying out Sweetwater's door a' hellin'!

In fact, people that had very little intention to buying another guitar were snapping them up.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 28, 2015,
#19
wish i'd have noticed those clearance prices at sweetwater!

this is really nice - i've played it.
http://www.amazon.com/Guild-D-125-Mahogany-Dreadnought-Natural/dp/B005KBPLB2/ref=sr_1_1

there are more of the GAD dreads on amazon, at musicians friend, at AMS for 3 monthly payments, and some on clearance at elderly.

i haven't tried the westerly series yet, but i bet they'll be almost the same as the GADs.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#21
so $50 more than the GAD version. do you spot any other differences?
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#22
Quote by patticake
so $50 more than the GAD version. do you spot any other differences?
None whatsoever.

I think the "Westerly" moniker is simple propaganda, an issue of "cognitive dissonance" (*). They're using the term "Westerly", to erase some of the stigma from a guitar built in, "the east".

(*) It's a Chinese guitar. I don't like Chinese guitars, but this one is called "Westerly", so it must be influenced by American built Guilds. Conflict in perception resolved!
#25
Would the Guild Gad D-120 make for a good strummer ?? An if not mistaken it's a Chinese made acoustic ??
#26
Here's the full GAD line: http://guildguitars.com/guitars/acoustic-guitars/gad-series/ Sorry, but they don't show a "D-120"....

For finger picking, many people like "orchestra model" sizing, this because of the midrange projection.

(The GAD series was blown out by Sweetwater about a month ago, to make room for the new "Westerly" series, which is basically "same shit, different name").

So, if anyone still has some, they might not be willing to part with them for cheap. You might have to do a bit of shopping around.

PS. All I came up with on a quick search is the "D-125", a mahogany top guitar, and "M-120" a "concert" size.

The hog top D-125 should work as a strummer. But, That's not the kind of thing I would jump into sight unheard, owing to that mahogany top.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 29, 2015,
#27
Thank you ,I do know "D" is dreadnought,but appreciate the confirmation in your response. I use Elixir Lights .012-.053 on my Yamaha at advice of music store owner.Only strings that have ever been on my Yamaha fg700s.Would that affect negatively in the way it sounds? This is the best advice post i have ever gotten from this site an i thank you all !!
#30
Quote by Kapkrusdader
Would the Guild Gad D-120 make for a good strummer ?? An if not mistaken it's a Chinese made acoustic ??
I don't know where you're coming up with this number. Yes, the other member does have a link to a "Guild NAT D-120". Which is again, all mahogany.

Where I'm losing the discussion, is the vintage and production status of the guitar.

I linked the "current" (yet still discontinued) "GAD" line, and all it Shows is a "D-125" all mahogany, and an "M-120", orchestra/folk/00 something or other. (I expect the "D-125" is likely the successor to the "D-120". That said, that would make the guitar two production releases ago.

If I'm going to buy a new guitar, I'd want it to actually BE a NEW guitar. Or...., have the seller drop his pants on the price.

Guitars get discontinued for various reasons, in the case of the Guild "GAD" series, it seems to be nothing but a name change and a price increase.

But, I have no knowledge of this "NAT" series whatsoever.

I would say, if I were going to but a mahogany topped guitar, I'd have to hear one, even if it wasn't the same model, merely the same wood. Mahogany top guitars are indeed well though of, so I'm not trying to arouse any suspicions on your part.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 29, 2015,
#31
Quote by Kapkrusdader
FWIW, Amazon isn't my first choice of places to buy a guitar. Even the "free shipping" is better from Sweetwater and certainly Musician's Friend. (They still use my favorite UPS, exclusively).

I'm not saying not to buy from Amazon, but I am saying keep your options open, and shop, shop, shop til you get the product and price you're hoping for. (Well, within reason).
#33
Quote by Tony Done
The GAD name change and price increase might reflect a new contract manufacturer.
I think the value of the dollar has dropped a bit, since pretty much everything from China seems to be increasing in price.

I read it as pretty much of a publicity tactic naming the "GAD" successor, "Westerly". You know, "these guitars were inspired by the original Guild guitars from the west", or other such nonsense.

But, you could be entirely correct, or it could be a combination of factors.

I would have gone for a more scientific nomenclature. Perhaps, Guitarium Occidentalis. But then of course the GAD series would have had to been named, "Guitarium Oreintalis", so as to make any sense of it....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 29, 2015,
#35
Quote by Captaincranky
Gosh you know, the TS rings in for $500.00, and you try to spend a grand. Ain't live great when you're spending someone else's money?


Hehehe...happens 100% of the time on this forum
#36
I played a Blueridge at the music shop and loved it. Guess I will just save for the one I know I like.. not sure the model. It wasn't an electric acoustic . Maybe BR 60 or BR 160. I will go look tomorrow.
#38
the BR 60 is the laminate rosewood b&s; the BR 160 is all solid and a sweet ax.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#40
Have a look at the Washburn wj40sce. I recently bought it and am very happy with the sound and playability. It is a Jumbo model and is really good value for its price. In New Zealand it cost me around $700.00 but I imagine this will be a lot less in the states.
It has a Fishman Presys + pickup as well which is a big advantage if your looking at plugging
into a PA system.