#1
Hey guys,

So I completely rewired my Les Paul a while ago (replaced all wires except the ones coming from the pickups, as well as replaced the switch, pots and caps). I took care to use A 500K CTS pots and 0.22 Orange Drop caps (those are the right values for humbuckers, right?), same values as the old stuff that was in there. The only thing I changed was to change the volume pots from linear to audio. Tone pots and caps are the same values.

But now both pickups are muddy as fvck and the tone controls don't seem to do anything. Can anyone give me a possible cause of this? Did I wire the caps up the wrong way or could there be a short/cold solder somewhere? My volume controls work fine and I tested the tone pots with a multimeter. The resistance values all check out. Plus, I don't think the pots or caps could be broken since both tone controls have the same problem (and both seem equally muddy). So... any ideas? Anyone?

PS: I can upload my schematics if you need them.
PPS: Is this the right forum for this kind of stuff or does it belong in "Electric Guitar"?
"Most people work just hard enough not to get fired and get paid just enough not to quit." - George Carlin
Last edited by LazyHardRocker at Sep 28, 2015,
#2
Could you post the schematic and a photo of what it looks like now?
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#3
Here's the schematics. Pic is coming.
Attachments:
diagram.png
"Most people work just hard enough not to get fired and get paid just enough not to quit." - George Carlin
#4
It's probably worth noting I didn't wire the caps in the way this schematic shows. I soldered them to the bottom lugs of both pots.
"Most people work just hard enough not to get fired and get paid just enough not to quit." - George Carlin
#6
I now also see the ground circuit runs differently from the schematic (counterclockwise from top right towards the jack).
"Most people work just hard enough not to get fired and get paid just enough not to quit." - George Carlin
#7
good choice with the 1950s style wiring. No control usually means there is nowhere for the pots signal to leave. This would be a grounding issue if it's the case.

are the pickups new by any chance? if so try lowering the height so the sound gets less muddy. If not there is a mod or two to fix muddiness. One in which you put a small valued capacitor before the pickups hot lead. The other is this tone knob I talk about a lot that people will actually have use for at high gain settings.

if anything try re-wiring from scratch if you have to going over every wire. This diagram I know for certain works for the1950s style. If your pickups have 4 wires make sure to use the right color code.
#8
Oh well, guess I did the 50s wiring by chance (made my own schematics lol). But no, it's still the same pickups that came with the guitar when I bought it 3 years ago. I didn't change anything about the pickup height and the muddiness happens in both pickups, so I was thinking I made the same mistake in both tone controls. Could it be that there's a short somewhere and the signal just bypasses the tone pot and goes straight to ground?
"Most people work just hard enough not to get fired and get paid just enough not to quit." - George Carlin
#9
I admire people who do the same and make their own schematics, you end up learning so much more about the ins and outs of the guitar.

The good news is comparing your schematic to mine I got online it honestly looks identical. My advice is simple. Look for cold solders or anything touching the inside of the guitar as shielding paint can frustrate people. The fact there isn't an overwhelming amount of buzzing from a string ground issue and there is signal coming out of the guitar to the amp means it should be a small issue.

The fact your pickups have their individual control and assuming the capacitors didn't get damaged which can happen with certain kinds at high temperatures the problem may be either the bottom lug (in my schematic) getting to ground properly. You can cheat and use the leads from capacitors you snip off with wire cutters or even solder the lug directly to the pot. That or the capacitor may be the problem getting soldered to the contacts. This is of course what I'd look for first. But let's see what everyone else will say.
#10
Hmm... there's no shielding paint as far as I'm aware. You know any way to check for cold solders with a multimeter? Also, thanks for all this, it's been really helpful so far!
"Most people work just hard enough not to get fired and get paid just enough not to quit." - George Carlin
#11
Quote by Tallwood13
good choice with the 1950s style wiring. No control usually means there is nowhere for the pots signal to leave. This would be a grounding issue if it's the case.

Not a hugely important point but that's not '50s style wiring. '50s wiring on a Les Paul is wiring the tone pot to the central lug of the volume, where the signal departs the pot to the selector switch. If you'd done the independent volume mod (pickup to inner lug, outer lug to switch), then wiring the tone to the outer lug would be '50s wiring.

Neither have been done here. I'd say check everything over to make sure it's all in the right place if you deviated from your schematic. Hard to see what's going on at the actual lugs.
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