#1
Hi all,

I'm moving away from my beginner bass, a pretty naff Stagg BC300 that has served me surprisingly well. My bass of choice is the SBMM SUB 5, as I'm looking for a 5 string with a bit of grunt behind it. I play a lot of covers, such as Radiohead, Rage Against the Machine and Muse, to name but a few. I also like to play slap, although that's still a steep learning curve for me. I should be purchasing the new bass around Christmas. Any suggestions other than the sub?

Anyway, I've been looking at the Roland Cube 30 Bass to replace my god awful 10W practice amp that came with the Stagg. I've heard its one of the best amps out there at its price point. However, the price seems a little high for me. Its also incredibly hard to find the one I'm looking for! I can't seem to find the exact one that I've been reading about, at least not locally. My budget falls around that of the 20W variant, however, and I've been considering that. As I have access to a 50W amp at school, I don't really feel the need for a massive stack at home, but I'm not sure - will a 20W amp be able to support a 5 string?

Thanks in advance,

Woody
Last edited by Bassmania127 at Sep 28, 2015,
#2
A smaller amp should be able to support a low B, the problem is that there are far more low quality amps in the low in wattage zone than there are in the high wattage zone.

I think the SBMM SUB 5 should be a pretty nice bass for what you want! Not sure about the amp because I have no experience with it. If you give us price points we can better set you in a good direction.
...it was bright as the sun, but with ten times the heat
#3
A speaker needs to move four times as much air to produce a note at the same volume as the note an octave above it.

You may want to simply save your money a while longer.
#4
Quote by dspellman
A speaker needs to move four times as much air to produce a note at the same volume as the note an octave above it.

You may want to simply save your money a while longer.


I can probably stretch up to £170 for an amp, but I have a total budget of £490 for bass + amp. The SUB 5 is £325 here.

Woody
#5
Quote by Bassmania127
I can probably stretch up to £170 for an amp, but I have a total budget of £490 for bass + amp. The SUB 5 is £325 here.

Woody


When I wanted to add bass to my capabilities, I asked a lot of questions of the bass players I worked with. The answer was almost universal: "Start at the back and work forward."

In other words, start with the bass cabinet.

It needs to be able to reproduce what you need to hear at the levels you need to hear them. If it's a specific "baked-in" sound that you need, then go with that, but if you want versatility (if you're going to be doing slap and maybe some dubstep) then get a flat response cabinet with a wide range. This seems to be where most modern bass players are going these days, because they can replicate the "baked-in" sounds more easily when they want to with this kind of cabinet.

Then add enough clean power to make that cabinet function optimally.
Then pick out the kind of preamp (whether mated with the power amp or not) that produces the sounds you want to hear.
Then get a bass guitar.

I didn't listen, of course -- I bought a cheap (under $100 used) four-string bass to practice on through a Bass Pod XT and a set of good headphones. My first few times playing out (band practice, not gigging) with the bass, I just ran the Bass Pod XT into a PA mixing board. Plenty of power, wide sound range. At that point, it became obvious to me that what would work best for me would be a PA-style speaker cabinet and a good solid power amp, and that's what I ended up with. YMMV.

It was only later that I bought a five-string (Carvin LB75 with active preamp). But the backline rig remained perfect.