#1
Hi,

I'm an amateur who play guitar for relaxing but I'm really pissing off right now as I teach myself how to play guitar and learn a chord progression that I found on the interent but I still can't find a chord of any song by listening to ear.
Help me on what am I really missing out there. I can solo in note and scale but can't play the chord of its.

Here the song I've tried.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZIfcN0g0_c

I think it's written in B but I'm not sure. I just heard the bass line is B. I'm really confuse please hlep me.
#2
As far as I listened, song is using chords from B major.

I | iii | I | vi | IV | I | iii vi | ii I

i.e

B D#m B G#m E B D#m B C#m B etc.

Listen for bass notes, and find where they are in the scale of B major. That will tell you the type of chord (maj, min).
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Sep 29, 2015,
#3
As I said in the other thread, learn about keys and chord functions. It will help you with recognizing chords.

Also, as said above, listen to the bass. Then listen to the quality (major, minor, diminished, augmented, whatever) of the chord. Bass doesn't always play root notes so you need to be aware of that.


Start with something simpler than the song you posted. Something with one chord per bar, no modulations, no 7th or extended chords, no inversions, diatonic chords only. You could use an app for that.

Maybe try this. You can change the difficulty. Start with I IV and V chords, and if that feels too easy, add more chords to it.

http://tonedear.com/ear-training/chord-progressions

The voice leading on that is pretty ugly... And it also seems to play a bit random progressions. Does anybody have any other recommendations for similar apps? I know I have seen one that was pretty similar but better, but can't find it.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#4
A lot of Asian music is pentatonic in nature.
Glad to cross paths with you on this adventure called life
Quote by Jet Penguin
lots of flirting with the other key without confirming. JUST LIKE THEIR LOVE IN THE MOVIE OH DAMN.
Quote by Hail
you're acting like you have perfect pitch or something
#5
Quote by MaggaraMarine
As I said in the other thread, learn about keys and chord functions. It will help you with recognizing chords.

Also, as said above, listen to the bass. Then listen to the quality (major, minor, diminished, augmented, whatever) of the chord. Bass doesn't always play root notes so you need to be aware of that.


Start with something simpler than the song you posted. Something with one chord per bar, no modulations, no 7th or extended chords, no inversions, diatonic chords only. You could use an app for that.

Maybe try this. You can change the difficulty. Start with I IV and V chords, and if that feels too easy, add more chords to it.

http://tonedear.com/ear-training/chord-progressions

The voice leading on that is pretty ugly... And it also seems to play a bit random progressions. Does anybody have any other recommendations for similar apps? I know I have seen one that was pretty similar but better, but can't find it.


Could you provide me a source to keys and chord functions lesson? I dont wanna google I want to see your source first.
#6
I don't know any good lessons (because I haven't really looked them up), so I'm trying to explain it. It's really not that complex.

First of all, you need to be able to figure out the key of the song. How to do it? Use your ears. You want to find the tonic - the home note/chord. That's what defines key. If it's a major chord, you are in a major key, and if it's a minor chord, you are in a minor key. If the tonic is Cm, you are in the key of C minor. If the tonic is E major, you are in the key of E major.

Let's try this with a couple of progressions. Play them and listen. Which of the chords feels like tonic?

1) Am7-D7-G

2) Bb-Em7b5-A7-Dm

3) E-A-B7

1) G major

2) D minor

3) E major


What are chord functions? Every chord has a function in a key. The key is what defines how a chord sounds like. For example C major chord sounds way different in the key of C than it sounds like in the key of F. It has a way different function.

We usually use Roman numerals when referring to chord functions. They indicate the scale degree the chord is built on. For example the V chord is built on the 5th scale degree.

Why we want to use chord functions is because the same chord function always sounds the same. V chord always sounds like the V chord, regardless of the key we are in.

If we are in C major, we use the C major scale to build our chords. The V chord of C major is G major because G is the 5th note of the key scale, and if we use the notes of C major to build the chord, the quality of the chord is major. G B D - root, major 3rd, perfect 5th. (You should also learn about chord construction and intervals.)

Try these two progressions:

C-F-G-C

Ab-Db-Eb-Ab

Sounds the same, doesn't it? That's because they are both I-IV-V-I progressions.


Remember that not all chords are diatonic to the key (ie, the notes don't fit the key scale). This is not against any rules. Non-diatonic chords sound good and are very common. You just need to remember that the key is defined by the tonic.

For example C-Eb-F-C is in the key of C major (because C major sounds like the tonic), even though it uses a non-diatonic chord, Eb major.

But start with diatonic stuff first.

Chord functions are there to support your ear. As I said, the same chord function will sound the same in any key. You want to learn how all the different chord functions sound. Start with I, IV and V chords and then start adding more chords.

And as you learn new songs, you may want to analyze what you are playing. That's really the best way to learn how chords are usually used. You may notice that a lot of songs are based on similar chord progressions.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#7
Great advice, Maggara. Especially about analyzing the songs you learn. Learning to play a song, using tabs or chord charts or whatever, only helps you to play that particular song, unless you analyze it to understand what's actually happening.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#8
Quote by sosxradar
Could you provide me a source to keys and chord functions lesson?
A good guitar-friendly one is this:
http://www.essentialguitar.com/

For chord functions, try this:
http://openmusictheory.com/harmonicFunctions.html
or this (use arrows to go through the steps):
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/57

More:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diatonic_function
http://musictheorysite.com/creating-diatonic-chord-progressions

Remember this is only about "common practices" - not rules every piece of music has to follow.