#1
Hello,
I've been playing for 4 years now, but I still feel like I'm on a beginners level.
I recently learned "laid to rest" by lamb of god, and I can barely play along with the song (except the last riff, that's way too hard). This obviously not where I should be after playing for so long. What am I doing wrong? Am I missing something?
Thanks!
#2
This should probably be in the guitar techniques forum, but...

Without hearing a recording or seeing a video of you play, it's impossible to tell. A guitar teacher, who can sit with you and watch/listen will be able to identify your weaknesses, and put you on track to improving them.
#3
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#4
Quote by slapsymcdougal
This should probably be in the guitar techniques forum, but...

Without hearing a recording or seeing a video of you play, it's impossible to tell. A guitar teacher, who can sit with you and watch/listen will be able to identify your weaknesses, and put you on track to improving them.

https://soundcloud.com/assafle/gojira-oroborus-cover
I recorded this a few months back, maybe this will help.
Here is an (extremely flawed) attempt at laid to rest:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K3ezF26etrM
A teacher, sadly, isn't really a viable option for me.
Thanks for helping
#5
^^The biggest thing I saw was that your picking hand is rather high on the guitar during most of the song, and you weren't/weren't able to palm mute during much of the riff. There is palm-muting throughout most of that song, as there is in most Lamb of God songs. When you play those single-note riff runs, you've got to palm-mute between a lot of those notes so that they don't ring out but stay tight and distinct. With very much gain, as there is in most metal music, you have to mute between certain notes so that they don't all run together.

I would work on your right hand positioning so that you've got your palm positioned so that it can mute at an instant's notice. I also noticed that you seemed pretty relaxed (which is good), but the motion from your wrist was completely side-to-side, rather than having more of a rotational/"turning a doorknob" motion. The latter is a more natural motion, as our wrists are capable of freer movement that way. I would suggest exploring that -- but it doesn't necessarily work for everybody.

It also looked like you were using a larger range of motion than necessary to play the riffs. This has the effect of making you work harder to get to the next note, and it takes longer to get there. For that, I would suggest working on some simple picking exercises that focus on making your pick strokes as small as possible, and not wasting any motion. This will make your playing more efficient, more accurate, and cleaner in the long run.
Atmospheric dark metal w/ black and death metal influences:
(My Soundcloud page):

Pestilential Flood
Last edited by KailM at Sep 30, 2015,
#6
Quote by KailM
^^The biggest thing I saw was that your picking hand is rather high on the guitar during most of the song, and you weren't/weren't able to palm mute during much of the riff. There is palm-muting throughout most of that song, as there is in most Lamb of God songs. When you play those single-note riff runs, you've got to palm-mute between a lot of those notes so that they don't ring out but stay tight and distinct. With very much gain, as there is in most metal music, you have to mute between certain notes so that they don't all run together.

I would work on your right hand positioning so that you've got your palm positioned so that it can mute at an instant's notice. I also noticed that you seemed pretty relaxed (which is good), but the motion from your wrist was completely side-to-side, rather than having more of a rotational/"turning a doorknob" motion. The latter is a more natural motion, as our wrists are capable of freer movement that way. I would suggest exploring that -- but it doesn't necessarily work for everybody.

It also looked like you were using a larger range of motion than necessary to play the riffs. This has the effect of making you work harder to get to the next note, and it takes longer to get there. For that, I would suggest working on some simple picking exercises that focus on making your pick strokes as small as possible, and not wasting any motion. This will make your playing more efficient, more accurate, and cleaner in the long run.

Wow! Thanks for the effort!
Could you recommend a few exercises for palm muting and small-picking? I guess I never really did it properly..
#7
Quote by BKSlash
Hello,
I've been playing for 4 years now, but I still feel like I'm on a beginners level.
I recently learned "laid to rest" by lamb of god, and I can barely play along with the song (except the last riff, that's way too hard). This obviously not where I should be after playing for so long. What am I doing wrong? Am I missing something?
Thanks!


1) Practice 2 hours at least per day for several months - if you suck after that than you have a real problem. 4 years doesn't mean anything if your practice 40 minutes every three days. When I started I was practicing 2 to 4 hours or more per day and I was playing Dream Theater about a year and a half into playing - I was better after that year and a half than basically every one of my friends who had been playing for many more years than me. The difference was that I was practicing and dedicated. If you aren't putting in serious time than you'll never master the guitar and really improve. It takes serious time to be good. 1 hour per day is not enough to be a good metal player.

2) When you learn songs - learn them slowly and never move on to the next part until you've mastered the first part. Always learn songs with the record ( i.e. play along with the actual track). If that means practicing the same 4 bar riff for 4 hours, than so be it. Many people who are bad players just blow through tunes without ever addressing trouble spots - you need to be meticulous. If they'res a part you're chocking on - stay on it until you get it.
#8
Quote by reverb66
1) Practice 2 hours at least per day for several months - if you suck after that than you have a real problem. 4 years doesn't mean anything if your practice 40 minutes every three days. When I started I was practicing 2 to 4 hours or more per day and I was playing Dream Theater about a year and a half into playing - I was better after that year and a half than basically every one of my friends who had been playing for many more years than me. The difference was that I was practicing and dedicated. If you aren't putting in serious time than you'll never master the guitar and really improve. It takes serious time to be good. 1 hour per day is not enough to be a good metal player.

2) When you learn songs - learn them slowly and never move on to the next part until you've mastered the first part. Always learn songs with the record ( i.e. play along with the actual track). If that means practicing the same 4 bar riff for 4 hours, than so be it. Many people who are bad players just blow through tunes without ever addressing trouble spots - you need to be meticulous. If they'res a part you're chocking on - stay on it until you get it.

The last few months I have been playing about 2 hours daily, but before that I was playing way less. I wanted to start learning Orion by Metallica, the last solo seems impossible to me right now. Should I start playing it at a speed I'm comfortable with (say, 50% speed), and move up a few bmps at a time? It would take me forever to get to the right speed, but is this the best way to approach this? Should I learn easier solos first and get back to this one when I'm better?
Sorry for these (probably) stupid questions, but I really want to get this right!
#9
One song I learned recently which I can imagine being very useful for people learning palm muting is L'Enfant Sauvage by Gojira. The opening riff is just an open string alternate picked and palm muted, with some of the upstrokes being open.

May be useful as an exercise, even if you slow it down to like 50% speed.

EDIT:

Quote by BKSlash
Should I start playing it at a speed I'm comfortable with (say, 50% speed), and move up a few bmps at a time? It would take me forever to get to the right speed, but is this the best way to approach this?


Yes. If you want to learn a difficult piece note-for-note then there isn't really a substitute or short cut.

Quote by BKSlash
Should I learn easier solos first and get back to this one when I'm better?


Entirely up to you. If you think that particular solo is too far out of your comfort zone then try some easier ones and work up to it. That will likely result in you being able to play the harder one sooner than if you were to simply practice with a metronome at 25% speed and increase it very, very slowly, and it will also be more enjoyable.
Last edited by Random3 at Sep 30, 2015,
#10
Quote by Random3
One song I learned recently which I can imagine being very useful for people learning palm muting is L'Enfant Sauvage by Gojira. The opening riff is just an open string alternate picked and palm muted, with some of the upstrokes being open.

May be useful as an exercise, even if you slow it down to like 50% speed.

I'll try it out, I'm also seeing them live in 2 weeks!
#12
First of all, don't be so hard on yourself. There was a lot of things you were doing pretty well. Second, it can be harder trying to copy someone else's riffs note-for-note than just trying to play the song your own way because you're trying to get into their "headspace" and that can be difficult at times. Third, slow down the hard parts and really try making sure you're feeling the playing accurately without a lot of tension and excess motion. Fourth, move on to something else for a while if you're getting too frustrated with it. It's amazing what NOT practicing something for a while can do when you swing back around later to try it again.
#13
Quote by BKSlash
The last few months I have been playing about 2 hours daily, but before that I was playing way less. I wanted to start learning Orion by Metallica, the last solo seems impossible to me right now. Should I start playing it at a speed I'm comfortable with (say, 50% speed), and move up a few bmps at a time? It would take me forever to get to the right speed, but is this the best way to approach this? Should I learn easier solos first and get back to this one when I'm better?
Sorry for these (probably) stupid questions, but I really want to get this right!



Gradually raising the speed is a good idea - you should also try going full speed on occasion for kicks ( Pettrucci recommends this).

Solos - it's best to build your way up - some solos will simply be too fast to start. Also, some solos sound much harder than they actually are to play. When starting out I would recommend Maiden, Sabbath ( Paranoid album) and Metallica - they are generally good beginner metal solos. Maiden is a great choice because they rarely go super fast, which is where things tend to fall apart. You need to be able to hear clearly what you have to play - slower solos are better for that.

Speed - check out John Pettrucci's instructional video - it's a goldmine for metal technique.
Last edited by reverb66 at Sep 30, 2015,
#14
Quote by BKSlash
Wow! Thanks for the effort!
Could you recommend a few exercises for palm muting and small-picking? I guess I never really did it properly..


For palm muting, the main thing is to just get your hand positioned so that you can quickly pivot it down onto the strings to dampen them. I would start by just creating a simple chord progression and chugging. Lift your palm slightly while you pick the strings and then mute, alternating your timing and pressure. Not all riffs have to be muted hard. You can literally spend YEARS perfecting your palm muting before you have absolute control. Then there's also left-hand muting which is more advanced but absolutely necessary if you want dead silence between notes/chords through high-gain. I've been doing it so long I don't have to think about it. I'd recommend a lot of Metallica songs, as they used a lot of palm-muting but the riffs are mostly easier than Lamb of God riffs.

For "picking small," I've always found that tremelo picking really works on that. Just pick any arpeggio that sounds good to you and work on tremelo picking it up and down the scale, using 4 strikes per note, alternate picking. Start slow at first and watch your pick -- it should only be moving far enough to strike the string and then come back for another strike on the upstroke. By starting slow, you'll be training yourself to be economical in your motions. Then, as you pick up speed, continue to monitor the size of your motion. Finally, it will sound like true tremelo picking, which can't be sustained if you're not efficient. This habit of "picking small" will transfer quite well to any other alternate picking you'll do, including the riffs on "Laid to Rest."
Atmospheric dark metal w/ black and death metal influences:
(My Soundcloud page):

Pestilential Flood
#15
Quote by KailM
For palm muting, the main thing is to just get your hand positioned so that you can quickly pivot it down onto the strings to dampen them. I would start by just creating a simple chord progression and chugging. Lift your palm slightly while you pick the strings and then mute, alternating your timing and pressure. Not all riffs have to be muted hard. You can literally spend YEARS perfecting your palm muting before you have absolute control. Then there's also left-hand muting which is more advanced but absolutely necessary if you want dead silence between notes/chords through high-gain. I've been doing it so long I don't have to think about it. I'd recommend a lot of Metallica songs, as they used a lot of palm-muting but the riffs are mostly easier than Lamb of God riffs.

For "picking small," I've always found that tremelo picking really works on that. Just pick any arpeggio that sounds good to you and work on tremelo picking it up and down the scale, using 4 strikes per note, alternate picking. Start slow at first and watch your pick -- it should only be moving far enough to strike the string and then come back for another strike on the upstroke. By starting slow, you'll be training yourself to be economical in your motions. Then, as you pick up speed, continue to monitor the size of your motion. Finally, it will sound like true tremelo picking, which can't be sustained if you're not efficient. This habit of "picking small" will transfer quite well to any other alternate picking you'll do, including the riffs on "Laid to Rest."

I'll defiantly start practicing palm muting and arpeggio tremolo picking, many thanks!
Quote by reverb66
Gradually raising the speed is a good idea - you should also try going full speed on occasion for kicks ( Pettrucci recommends this).

Solos - it's best to build your way up - some solos will simply be too fast to start. Also, some solos sound much harder than they actually are to play. When starting out I would recommend Maiden, Sabbath ( Paranoid album) and Metallica - they are generally good beginner metal solos. Maiden is a great choice because they rarely go super fast, which is where things tend to fall apart. You need to be able to hear clearly what you have to play - slower solos are better for that.

Speed - check out John Pettrucci's instructional video - it's a goldmine for metal technique.

I learned a few of Metallica's simpler solos a year or two back, I'll go over them and try getting them to full speed. I'll also check out Petrucci's video. Thanks for the help!
Quote by edg
First of all, don't be so hard on yourself. There was a lot of things you were doing pretty well. Second, it can be harder trying to copy someone else's riffs note-for-note than just trying to play the song your own way because you're trying to get into their "headspace" and that can be difficult at times. Third, slow down the hard parts and really try making sure you're feeling the playing accurately without a lot of tension and excess motion. Fourth, move on to something else for a while if you're getting too frustrated with it. It's amazing what NOT practicing something for a while can do when you swing back around later to try it again.

Thanks for the advice, I did notice that taking a short break makes you play the song better. Now I just need more songs to play...
Quote by Random3


Slightly jelly



You guys really made me pumped to play again
#16
Damn, you got some great advice BKslash!

I'd recommend a teacher to identify shortcomings, but it looks like you've already been hooked up!
#17
What I'd recommend in terms of hand position is to rest your palm just behind the saddles when you're playing the low E so you can shift it across to palm mute or to keep the low strings quiet when you play the high ones. I'd also work on avoiding anchoring; resting your hand is generally advisable, since "hovering" is awkward and creates tension, but if you're pressing it down in a fixed position that'll also create unnecessary tension. It looks to me like you're relying on keeping your wrist/forearm in a fairly rigid position. The sweet spot isn't that hard to come by, just have your hand in contact with the strings/bridge without pressing down, but you may have to slow down some of your riffs and build the speed back up to make sure you're keeping your hand relaxed as you play.
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Youre officially uber shit now.

Quote by StewieSwan
3d9310rd is far more upset than i 

Quote by Bladez22
I'm a moron tho apparently and everyone should listen to you oh wise pretentious one
#18
Quote by BKSlash
https://soundcloud.com/assafle/gojira-oroborus-cover
I recorded this a few months back, maybe this will help.
Here is an (extremely flawed) attempt at laid to rest:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K3ezF26etrM
A teacher, sadly, isn't really a viable option for me.
Thanks for helping


you're not actually that bad imo. you have some easily corrected bad habits (imo).

-your picking hand. you need to put it on the saddles and mute as the song requires. to practice, start out playing some chords or a single note and choking the strings dead and gradually lifting off until you are open and then slowly lowering back down to full choke. listen to how the tone changes and repeat. this way (imo) you will learn how to regulate the mute. in time this will be second nature and you will also learn where to place your palm as well. you will also develop a callus here and you can actually feel the strings getting hot on the saddles btw.

-your fretting hand (imo). your thumb needs to be centered on the back of the neck not over the top of the fretboard. the cradle position is cool for strumming and cowboy stuff but not (imo) for technical playing. it makes it real hard to get a "piston" like action with your fingers and makes it hard to control how far you lift your fingers off the fretboard. it seems like that chair is causing you to tuck you arm in towards your ribs. might wanna switch to something that frees up your left elbow so you can maintain a more comfortable posture when moving around on the neck.

-your guitar tone. (imo) death/grind/thrash/ etc... is best played with the bridge pickup full on with no neck pickup and the vol. and tone all the way up. watch what other good players do here but do what is best for you.

-also, this may sound silly but if you have no one around to help out. try playing in front of a mirror. not to check on your awesome showmanship but you can sometimes pick up on obvious things that you may not have noticed.

have fun at the show -watch and learn. (if you are close enough that is )
Last edited by ad_works at Sep 30, 2015,
#19
As mentioned above, your posture in that chair is terrible. That is the most glaring issue in my opinion. With your left elbow pinched and the guitar almost on your right hip, it's amazing you can play that well. When seated try to hold the guitar as if you were standing up and using a strap, maybe with the guitar between your legs instead of on the hip. This should help your right hand technique as well.
#20
Quote by ad_works
the cradle position is cool for strumming and cowboy stuff but not (imo) for technical playing

While you're right about the general point, that OP should, for his purposes, have his thumb on the back of the neck, this statement is nonsense unless your sole definition of technical is metal and even then is only true to a certain extent. In soloing, even MAB concedes that you need to get your thumb off the middle-of-the-back-of-the-neck for bends that don't sound shit.
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Youre officially uber shit now.

Quote by StewieSwan
3d9310rd is far more upset than i 

Quote by Bladez22
I'm a moron tho apparently and everyone should listen to you oh wise pretentious one
Last edited by K33nbl4d3 at Oct 1, 2015,
#21
If you can I would try learning your technique with just guitar and amp so you can hear your self clearly and just you playing guitar . I think with your setup you will mask a lot of mistakes in the sound that would be more clear with just a guitar and amp . good luck
#22
^^I disagree with that; and I'm not really sure he isn't just using his guitar and amp. I feel that people ought to practice with the tone they ultimately want. If he practiced with a clean setting or less gain than what the song uses, then he wouldn't learn to mute properly, because he wouldn't need to.

One of the biggest bullshit comments of all time (regarding guitar playing, that is) is the one that goes "high-gain just covers up your mistakes, and is for players who can't really play." That is rubbish because high-gain is necessary for some sounds, and requires a whole new skillset to use artfully. In the hands of someone who is only accustomed to playing low-gain/clean, my rig becomes an uncontrollable mess of feedback, for example. But in my hands, it is clear and articulate, and only noisy when I want it to be. It does take skill to use heavy distortion and make it sound good, it's just a different set of skills.
Atmospheric dark metal w/ black and death metal influences:
(My Soundcloud page):

Pestilential Flood
#23
Quote by KailM
^^I disagree with that; and I'm not really sure he isn't just using his guitar and amp. I feel that people ought to practice with the tone they ultimately want. If he practiced with a clean setting or less gain than what the song uses, then he wouldn't learn to mute properly, because he wouldn't need to.

One of the biggest bullshit comments of all time (regarding guitar playing, that is) is the one that goes "high-gain just covers up your mistakes, and is for players who can't really play." That is rubbish because high-gain is necessary for some sounds, and requires a whole new skillset to use artfully. In the hands of someone who is only accustomed to playing low-gain/clean, my rig becomes an uncontrollable mess of feedback, for example. But in my hands, it is clear and articulate, and only noisy when I want it to be. It does take skill to use heavy distortion and make it sound good, it's just a different set of skills.


I agree with everything in this post - practice with the sound you intend to use because controlling that sound is an art onto itself.
#24
Quote by KailM
^^I disagree with that; and I'm not really sure he isn't just using his guitar and amp. I feel that people ought to practice with the tone they ultimately want. If he practiced with a clean setting or less gain than what the song uses, then he wouldn't learn to mute properly, because he wouldn't need to.

One of the biggest bullshit comments of all time (regarding guitar playing, that is) is the one that goes "high-gain just covers up your mistakes, and is for players who can't really play." That is rubbish because high-gain is necessary for some sounds, and requires a whole new skillset to use artfully. In the hands of someone who is only accustomed to playing low-gain/clean, my rig becomes an uncontrollable mess of feedback, for example. But in my hands, it is clear and articulate, and only noisy when I want it to be. It does take skill to use heavy distortion and make it sound good, it's just a different set of skills.
I was referring more to the CD that he is playing along with , I have seen so many people that cover there bad playing with the cd - And I think but not sure the guy is using his computer or software so sure he wont get the same feed back like from a really high gain amp.
Last edited by dazzzer30 at Oct 1, 2015,
#25
^^Gotcha -- I see what you're saying now. And yes, playing along to a CD can have its drawbacks. You just have to be honest with yourself when doing so, asking "am I really playing the whole song, or am I letting the CD cover the parts I can't play?" It's a valuable tool for getting the timing and feel down though.
Atmospheric dark metal w/ black and death metal influences:
(My Soundcloud page):

Pestilential Flood
#26
- Analyze, observe every single riff in the song, practice them as if they were actual ''exercices'' from a guitar teacher. Reduce the entire song's speed by 25 % with the help of audacity. Increase the speed as you gain precision and proper sound.

- The other guys are right about your fretting hand and rythm hand. Follow their recommendations.

- Watch videos on youtube about how to hold your pick properly, the Universal method is to hold it like a shuriken. This *specific problem* put me BEHIND my bandmates by 2 years of practice when I started out.

- Practice all the parts of the song you feel OK with. If you feel blocked on a certain passage, go practice 7-8 other songs (from other bands) >>> you might ACQUIRE the skills and the picking from those new songs and be able to tackle the last part of Laid To Rest.

- Get new fingering exercices, you need them.

Good Luck.
#27
Sorry for not replying, I just came back from abroad.
Quote by TobusRex
Damn, you got some great advice BKslash!

I'd recommend a teacher to identify shortcomings, but it looks like you've already been hooked up!

Yes! This community is extremely helpful, informative and friendly!
Quote by K33nbl4d3
What I'd recommend in terms of hand position is to rest your palm just behind the saddles when you're playing the low E so you can shift it across to palm mute or to keep the low strings quiet when you play the high ones. I'd also work on avoiding anchoring; resting your hand is generally advisable, since "hovering" is awkward and creates tension, but if you're pressing it down in a fixed position that'll also create unnecessary tension. It looks to me like you're relying on keeping your wrist/forearm in a fairly rigid position. The sweet spot isn't that hard to come by, just have your hand in contact with the strings/bridge without pressing down, but you may have to slow down some of your riffs and build the speed back up to make sure you're keeping your hand relaxed as you play.

I understand that positioning is my main problem, but unfortunately it's probably the hardest thing to solve. Old habits die hard
Quote by ad_works
you're not actually that bad imo. you have some easily corrected bad habits (imo).

-your picking hand. you need to put it on the saddles and mute as the song requires. to practice, start out playing some chords or a single note and choking the strings dead and gradually lifting off until you are open and then slowly lowering back down to full choke. listen to how the tone changes and repeat. this way (imo) you will learn how to regulate the mute. in time this will be second nature and you will also learn where to place your palm as well. you will also develop a callus here and you can actually feel the strings getting hot on the saddles btw.

-your fretting hand (imo). your thumb needs to be centered on the back of the neck not over the top of the fretboard. the cradle position is cool for strumming and cowboy stuff but not (imo) for technical playing. it makes it real hard to get a "piston" like action with your fingers and makes it hard to control how far you lift your fingers off the fretboard. it seems like that chair is causing you to tuck you arm in towards your ribs. might wanna switch to something that frees up your left elbow so you can maintain a more comfortable posture when moving around on the neck.

-your guitar tone. (imo) death/grind/thrash/ etc... is best played with the bridge pickup full on with no neck pickup and the vol. and tone all the way up. watch what other good players do here but do what is best for you.

-also, this may sound silly but if you have no one around to help out. try playing in front of a mirror. not to check on your awesome showmanship but you can sometimes pick up on obvious things that you may not have noticed.

have fun at the show -watch and learn. (if you are close enough that is )

I've in fact ordered a foot rest a few days before posting this thread, should be arriving soon. Playing with the thumb on the middle of the neck is very painful for me, does that go away with time? The bridge pickup was selected, but I need to lower the volume a bit not to overload my audio interface. Hopefully I will be close
Quote by hemiola
As mentioned above, your posture in that chair is terrible. That is the most glaring issue in my opinion. With your left elbow pinched and the guitar almost on your right hip, it's amazing you can play that well. When seated try to hold the guitar as if you were standing up and using a strap, maybe with the guitar between your legs instead of on the hip. This should help your right hand technique as well.

As mentioned above, I ordered a foot rest, hopefully that will help.
Quote by dazzzer30
I was referring more to the CD that he is playing along with , I have seen so many people that cover there bad playing with the cd - And I think but not sure the guy is using his computer or software so sure he wont get the same feed back like from a really high gain amp.

Quote by KailM
^^Gotcha -- I see what you're saying now. And yes, playing along to a CD can have its drawbacks. You just have to be honest with yourself when doing so, asking "am I really playing the whole song, or am I letting the CD cover the parts I can't play?" It's a valuable tool for getting the timing and feel down though.

While learning the songs I usually play along with a guitar pro file, so it's actually easy to notice if I'm screwing up. I play with the actual song only once I'm able to play at the same speed.
Quote by zordan123
- Analyze, observe every single riff in the song, practice them as if they were actual ''exercices'' from a guitar teacher. Reduce the entire song's speed by 25 % with the help of audacity. Increase the speed as you gain precision and proper sound.

Mostly I play along with a guitar pro file so I can hear myself better, and change the speed more easily.

- The other guys are right about your fretting hand and rythm hand. Follow their recommendations.

- Watch videos on youtube about how to hold your pick properly, the Universal method is to hold it like a shuriken. This *specific problem* put me BEHIND my bandmates by 2 years of practice when I started out.

Haha, am I supposed to know how to hold a shuriken? Anyway, I'll look into it, thanks.

- Practice all the parts of the song you feel OK with. If you feel blocked on a certain passage, go practice 7-8 other songs (from other bands) >>> you might ACQUIRE the skills and the picking from those new songs and be able to tackle the last part of Laid To Rest.

This has actually been suggested on a previous comment, and I figured that out myself. Great tip for anyone.

- Get new fingering exercices, you need them.

Good Luck.

Could you please point me in a certain direction?

This goes to everyone: thanks for all the help!
#28
Quote by BKSlash



Playing with the thumb on the middle of the neck is very painful for me, does that go away with time?



Make sure you aren't gripping the neck. I had this exact issue a while ago, and some guys on here gave me some great advice.

What I mean is, your thumb should be gently,or even slightly firmly, anchored on the back of the neck. Not gripping it even somewhat tightly, this creates unnecessary tension in the the hand that can greatly affect your speed and comfort.

I too experienced great pain in my hand, as well as limited mobility. I found this tip to be unbelievably useful when playing rhythms with a lot of left hand movement(spider riff form Master of Puppets) and the pain in my hand has since faded.

It might take a while to adjust to this having been playing for four years, but I can 100% assure you that it is worthwhile.

Or it could be completely unrelated to hand tension, I dunno.
Last edited by Cheeseshark at Oct 6, 2015,